Truman, Bess W.

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Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his construction of the Jackson County Courthouse, his start in politics, and his family history.

Longhand Note of Judge Harry S. Truman

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his first encounters with his future wife, Bess Wallace; his start in politics at the hands of Mike Pendergast; and his decision to join the military.

From Harry S. Truman to Bess Wallace, January 19, 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman shows humility as he urges Bess to not inform others of his letter of commendation, stating that, "There's not one of us who have done anything that any other one of us could not and would not have done if the opportunity had offered."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess Wallace, January 11, 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman gives insight into his personality as a leader, stating that, "If there's one thing I've always hated in a man it is to see him take his spite out on someone who couldn't talk back to him.".

From Harry S. Truman to Bess Wallace, February 18, 1919

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was in France near Bar-le-Duc. Truman asserts his intention to marry Bess as soon as he returns from Europe, even though he has no money, stating that, "I haven't any place to go but home and I'm busted financially but I love you as madly as a man can and I'll find all the other things."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess Wallace, December 14, 1918

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman describes his life's dreams and expectations following the war, including his desire to be a farmer. He states, "I've almost come to the conclusion that it's not intended for me ever to be very rich, nor very poor, and I am about convinced that that will be about the happiest state a man can be."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 30, 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Council Grove, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travels and informs her of the how well he is being treated, saying that, "You should be along. I haven't spent a nickle [sic] and I can't. They won't let me[.] even the phone call was free."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 28, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 25, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 24, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments on Lloyd C. Stark running for the Senate while still the governor of Missouri. Truman then reflects on his past influence in Kansas City: "My patronage troubles were the result of the rotten situation in Kansas City and also the jealous disposition of my colleague. While the President is unreliable, the things he's stood for are, in my opinion, best for the country, and jobs should not interfere with general principles."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, September 20, 1921

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In the letter, Truman mentions sharing his hotel room with James Pendergast during an American Legion State Convention. Truman comments that James is, "a nice boy and as smart as the old man he's named for."

From Harry S. Truman to Bess W. Truman, October 9, 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his speech he gave the previous day and on some of the people he interacted with: "Reverend Foster is the most influential preacher in southeast Missouri and he spent the whole time getting all the facts on Pendergast and Stark. I made lots of hay I'll tell you. But it was hard work. They nearly pulled me to pieces."