Truman, Bess W.

Displaying 73 - 84 of 110
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning, including a meeting with Boyle Clark. When inquired about Missouri Governor Lloyd C. Stark, Truman said to Boyle Clark, "... I hadn't and didn't want to hear from the S.O.B. and that so far as I am concerned I didn't give a damn what he did or intended to do..."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent meetings in which he has "been politicking around among the Senators and Congressmen, distributing a little hooch where it would do the most good, and trying to find out what they think of Bennett Champ Clark for President."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and expresses his simple desire to be a businessman in a small town. He then recounts a dinner meeting with other Senators, including Joseph F. Guffey. Truman exclaims that, "He has a desire to be a Senate boss and since I don't like Pennsylvania anyway it wasn't hard for me to be against him. He tried to get Tom P. [Pendergast] to bring pressure on me about his real bill and Tom told me about it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was in France near Bar-le-Duc. Truman asserts his intention to marry Bess as soon as he returns from Europe, even though he has no money, stating that, "I haven't any place to go but home and I'm busted financially but I love you as madly as a man can and I'll find all the other things."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Pickwick Hotel in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman provides Bess with another update on the layoff of 202 county workers: "The papers didn't treat me so very badly. I guess I'll survive-politically I mean."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts the dinner he had with railroad lobbyist Jim Nugent: "In fact I think everyone has a right to be heard if you expect to get all the facts. Of course it is the job of some people to befog the issue and cover up the facts. I don't put Jim in that class."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and then provides information on the Missouri public's current opinion of Governor Lloyd C. Stark: "There are a number of letters from all over the state giving the governor a real dressing down. One calls him Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-for T.J.P. to get elected and against him to get headlines."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Continental in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Tom Pendergast in New York, saying that he "... had a most pleasant visit with T. J. P. He [Pendergast] was as pleased to see me as a ten-year-old kid to see his lost pal."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Pickwick Hotel in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Buena Vista, Colorado. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his return to Kansas City and his speech there. Of his associates, he noted that "Mr. [Bennett C.] Clark accepted but failed to appear as usual. Told Jim P. [Pendergast] he'd be in this afternoon but didn't come."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Truman describes his attraction to the military, then says, "You be a good girl and I'll be a good boy. I have been. I haven't had a thing to drink nor have I drawn a single card."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman describes his life's dreams and expectations following the war, including his desire to be a farmer. He states, "I've almost come to the conclusion that it's not intended for me ever to be very rich, nor very poor, and I am about convinced that that will be about the happiest state a man can be."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and mentions his activities from the previous day: "...Joe Guffey and I studied the various strains of thoroughbred horses at Laurel (in the interest of agriculture you understand). I lost most of my Saturday's winnings but we had a grand time..."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.