Truman, Bess W.

Displaying 61 - 72 of 110
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Governor Clinton in New York City to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman updates Bess on his morning and his trip to New York, saying that "[John N. Garner, Nathan L. Bachman, and William J. Bulow] had been to see T.J. [Tom Pendergast] and I must try to find out what they did tomorrow."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his past week and of the telegrams he received that morning, one from Tom Pendergast "recommending a good for nothing bird for a job and I won't recommend him."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his distaste for social functions, commenting that "I don't do things for people for a reward, if I did I ought to be rich. I do it because I like to do it, but if they just keep harping on it I get sick of it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman shows his commitment to the state and his ideals: "I went into the R.R. business again today and I think got some more real information. I have a notion it didn't please Mr. [William T.] Kemper [Sr.] very much. But I can't help it. I'm not working for him. I'm working for Missouri."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this candid letter, Truman informs Bess that he intends to travel in secret to New York to meet with Tom Pendergast.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Gibbons in Dayton, Ohio to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel east to Dayton and then speaks about the newly erected Liberty Memorial: "...Will Rogers says it looks like a silo. Other people have the right slant on R.A. Long's monument to himself as well as us perverted people who only fought the war behind a gun."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his campaign for a National Old Trails Road and State Highway for Kansas.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his yearning to be with Bess and declares that "When I get that courthouse located and the contract let, we'll take another weddin' tour and maybe I can get back on earth (if I'm not in the midst of a state campaign)."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on the flattery he receives from his colleagues: "The Senators all pretended to miss me and were very cordial to me-so was the Vice President. He appreciated my contribution so much he wouldn't even open it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on personal matters and then comments that, "This has been a dizzy week. Every day I've been listening to the woes of the taxpayers and getting no where. I am going to straighten things out before another week."

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