Truman, Bess W.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 110
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on personal matters and then comments that, "This has been a dizzy week. Every day I've been listening to the woes of the taxpayers and getting no where. I am going to straighten things out before another week."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his increased influence at Fort Riley, remarking that, "I'm having a wonderful time doing a little political maneuvering. Also evening up some scores. The colonel listens to what I say and when I make suggestions about certain regular army officers he immediately flies into them... You see politics is never absent when I'm around."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman speaks candidly about fashion with Bess: "Say, if you want your hair bobbed so badly, go on and get it done. I want you to be happy regardless of what I think about it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Lafayette in Little Rock, Arkansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and comments that many people in Jackson County, Missouri are asking him for favors, saying that, "...the finances of the county were never in such shape since Miles Bulger handled them, and every person I've ever had any association with since birth has wanted me to take pity on him and furnish him some county money without much return."

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his construction of the Jackson County Courthouse, his start in politics, and his family history.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his upcoming plans and comments on the newspapers' opinion of Lloyd C. Stark': "The K.C. Star, the Post-Dispatch, and the Star-Times in St. Louis are giving Mr. Stark dig after dig. It looks as if their hero has feet of clay (or rotten apples)."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman aboard the National Limited (Baltimore & Ohio Railroad) to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his entitlements during the trip: "Davis suggests that I inform you of all the tricks we are entitled to on this Limited whether we use them or not; such as maid, hairdresser, barber shop & bath, secretary, valet, tailor etc. etc. ad infinitum."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then comments on his present association with the Kansas City political machine: "The terrible things done by the high ups in K.C. will be a lead weight to me from now on, and I've just go to win anyhow and make 'em like it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then shows his political persistence: "If I quit this thing now, they'll say that Kemper and the Boss pulled me off, and I'm going to go through with it if I don't get home at all."

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his first encounters with his future wife, Bess Wallace; his start in politics at the hands of Mike Pendergast; and his decision to join the military.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Camp Ripley near Little Falls, Minnesota to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his time since his arrival and about the contraband liquor available at Camp Ripley and Mason City, Iowa.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Robidoux in St. Joseph, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. On the eve of his forty-ninth birthday, Truman reflects to Bess that, "Politics should make a thief... and a pessimist of anyone, but I don't believe I'm any of them and if I can get the Kansas City courthouse done without scandal no other judge will have done as much, and then maybe I can retire as collector..."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.