Truman, Bess W.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 110
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Great Bend, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman elaborates on the hospitality he is receiving in Great Bend, saying that, "This is almost like campaigning for President except that the people are making promises to me instead of the other way around."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming travel plans. He then candidly comments that "Pendergast wants to see me and Clark and I'm of the opinion that everything will be settled when we see him. Wouldn't the papers give something to know that?"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of some political maneuvering involving Bennett C. Clark, saying that "It would have been taken for an obvious attempt on my part to keep him and the St. Louis gang from the Gov. and I don't want to do that."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman gives insight into his personality as a leader, stating that, "If there's one thing I've always hated in a man it is to see him take his spite out on someone who couldn't talk back to him.".

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman writes of their sixteenth anniversary with self-reflection and ambition, commenting that, "I am hoping to make a reputation as a Senator,... but you'll have to put up with a lot if I do it because I won't sell influence and I'm perfectly willing to be cussed if I'm right."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Grandview, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then informs her that "I shall have a great deal to tell you about the two jobs I'm to choose from when I see you. There are excellent reasons for taking either, and the same kind for taking neither, so we'll decide it later."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his plans for the next two weeks and his recent work making payrolls and salary cuts.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and muses upon an alternative time line in which he and Bess were married earlier, commenting that, "I don't see how I got along until I was thirty-four without you. Just think of all the wasted years that could have been pleasantly and profitably spent. I might even have been a financial success if I'd started with you sooner."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Dodge City, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman describes the geography of southwest central Kansas, and exclaims, "...from the look of things we... will have all the cities in this neighborhood pulling for our National Old Trails..."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he met up with Lee C. "Doc" Johnson, then spent the following day, "…trying to make a budget. It will require the discharge of some two hundred and two employees…"

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to his fiancée Bess Wallace while Truman was at Camp La Baholle, near Verdun, France. Truman shows humility as he urges Bess to not inform others of his letter of commendation, stating that, "There's not one of us who have done anything that any other one of us could not and would not have done if the opportunity had offered."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments briefly on Kansas City politics: "I see that the Journal is still having a pick at the County Court. If Mr. Dickey had gotten his streets accepted he'd have been pleased with the operation of the court."

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