Truman, Bess W.

Displaying 85 - 96 of 110
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments briefly on Kansas City politics: "I see that the Journal is still having a pick at the County Court. If Mr. Dickey had gotten his streets accepted he'd have been pleased with the operation of the court."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his trip to Chicago and his breakfast with Leo Packer, Mr. Byers, and Dick Adams. Truman says, "Dick you know was a Republican alderman in Kansas City. He said he is for me and expected to do all he could."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this rather candid letter, Harry requests Bess to "Please bring my "Anthony" salve. I have a tender place on my saddle connection."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and with county matters, saying that, "The sheriff has... closed the Independence jail. He thinks he'll cripple the road work. I'm not sorry he closed the jail because we don't need two and it will give me an excuse to cut some more expense."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he will be calling President Roosevelt concerning James K. Vardaman, Jr and court proposition and executive reorganization plan.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on Missouri politics, saying that, "Paul Dillon is all worried about the St. Louis situation and Matt Murray. They are in the midst of a big fight down there. Igor and the Mayor are fighting and I can't worry much."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then candidly comments on his nepotism, saying that, "If I made everybody I've gotten jobs for since 1927 pay me by the month as Bulger used to, we'd have a nice tidy sum to the leeward every month, but I'm just a d.f. I guess I can't take it that way."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the newspaper's reception at Truman laying off over two hundred county workers: "The Star is off me anyway. I think our friend at the city hall has been "helping me out" down there."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

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