Pendergast, James M.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 145

From William P. Harvey to Lloyd Stark

Letter from William P. Harvey to Missouri gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark, asking that, along with James Aylward, Jim Pendergast also be invited to his "Corn Husking Bee" to avoid misinterpretation about his appearance alone.

From William M. Boyle to James M. Pendergast

A letter from William M. Boyle to James M. Pendergast in which Boyle inquires if Pendergast would like to renew his commission as an officer in the Army for combat in the second World War. Boyle makes it clear that, "it would mean immediate duty with the possibility of such duty being in the actual combat zone." Boyle then discusses the 1942 political campaign as it pertains to Kansas City and references "the Senator" (Harry S. Truman).

From William Ledbetter to Lloyd C. Stark

Letter from William M. Ledbetter to Lloyd C. Stark discussing the logistics of the upcoming campaign, including how much time Stark will spend at his home in Louisiana, the upcoming Missouri Press Association meeting and American Royal, and gossip about other potential candidates including William Hirth.

From William Ledbetter to Charles Aylward

Letter from William Ledbetter to Charles Aylward discussing Lloyd Stark's attempts to meet with Jim and Tom Pendergast while visiting Kansas City and other campaign updates.

From William Kitchen to Mrs. Powell

This letter from Kitchen recommends placing an advertisement in the 'Missouri Legionnaire' in response to one placed by his competitor in the gubernatorial primary. He concludes by encouraging Lloyd Stark to meet very soon with Tom Pendergast because he learned that the Kansas City strongman was soon to have surgery in New York.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, May 12, 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, March 25, 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, April 6, 1937

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides his opinion on two appointments to the Workmen's Compensation Commission and the political repercussions of the same. He also informs Truman of James M. Pendergast's opinion on the situation.

From W. M. Ledbetter to W. L. Bouchard

Letter from William Ledbetter to W. L. Bouchard discussing Stark campaign issues, how appointments will be allotted through Missouri counties, and appointing members of the campaign's finance committee.

From W. M. Ledbetter to W. L. Bouchard

Letter from William Ledbetter to W. L. Bouchard discussing financial and organizational arrangements of Stark's gubernatorial campaign.

From W. M. Ledbetter to Charles Aylward

Letter from W. M. Ledbetter acknowledging the receipt of a campaign contribution and discussing contributions from other supporters.

From V. R. Messall to Jewell B. Hodge

Letter from V. R. Messall on behalf of Senator Harry S. Truman Young Democratic Club of Eastern Jackson County President Jewell B. Hodge. Messall responds to Hodge's request for a solution for the political situation currently affecting Independence, Missouri Mayor Roger T. Sermon and James M. Pendergast. He informs Hodge that Truman has already left for Missouri for at least a week and that Messall will notify Truman upon his return to Washington.