Pendergast, James M.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 145
Genre: 
Correspondence

Photocopy of a letter from President Harry S. Truman to James M. Pendergast in which Truman provides his opinion on the federal investigations of Tom Pendergast's tax fraud. The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Genre: 
Ephemera

Typed on United States Senate Memorandum paper, this list includes the names and addresses of every Pendergast Democratic Organization officer and ward leader including Thomas J. Pendergast, James M. Pendergast, George Harrington, Elijah Mathes, and B. W. Gnefkow.

Genre: 
Photographs

Kansas City political boss Thomas J. Pendergast and his nephew, James Pendergast, sit on a bench together in what appears to be an office, ca. 1939. From: Truman Home.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Photocopy of a letter from President Harry S. Truman to James M. Pendergast in Kansas City. After learning that James had sided in opinion with one of Truman's political adversaries, Truman sends a heated letter, mentioning that he never thought it to "be necessary for me to ask a Pendergast to make a choice between an upstart little Rabbit and the President of the United States." Truman ends the letter saying, "[Roger] Slaughter is obnoxious to me and you must make your choice." The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Genre: 
Narratives

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his construction of the Jackson County Courthouse, his start in politics, and his family history.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Photocopy of a letter from James M. Pendergast to his wife Kathleen Pendergast. James recounts the details of John Lazia's funeral which the local newspapers believe to be Kansas City's largest funeral gathering. He then updates Kathleen on his trip to Monroe County and on his upcoming trip with Harry S. Truman to Cameron, Missouri. The letter is written on Jackson Democratic Club letterhead that also includes Harry S. Truman and T. J. Pendergast as members of the executive board. The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Photocopy of a letter from President Harry S. Truman to James M. Pendergast in Kansas City. Responding to Pendergast's request for suggestions for Kansas City mayor candidates, Truman suggests that Bryce Smith should run again. Truman states, "Bryce made a good Mayor and I know he has always been our friend." The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides his opinion on two appointments to the Workmen's Compensation Commission and the political repercussions of the same. He also informs Truman of James M. Pendergast's opinion on the situation.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Photocopy of a letter on behalf of President Harry S. Truman to James M. Pendergast, President of the Jackson Democratic Club at 1908 Main Street. Enclosed with the letter was a check for $6.00 to the Jackson Democratic Club, a Pendergast organization, for membership dues for 1948. The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Genre: 
Ephemera

Business card of "James M. Pendergast, Attorney at Law, 1209 Commerce Bldg., Kansas City Missouri. Phone Harrison 5166."

Genre: 
Correspondence

A letter from William M. Boyle to James M. Pendergast in which Boyle inquires if Pendergast would like to renew his commission as an officer in the Army for combat in the second World War. Boyle makes it clear that, "it would mean immediate duty with the possibility of such duty being in the actual combat zone." Boyle then discusses the 1942 political campaign as it pertains to Kansas City and references "the Senator" (Harry S. Truman).

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.