Pendergast, James M.

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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman discusses a few minor personal matters and mentions his activities from the previous day: "...Joe Guffey and I studied the various strains of thoroughbred horses at Laurel (in the interest of agriculture you understand).

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Pickwick Hotel in Kansas City, Missouri to his wife Bess in Buena Vista, Colorado. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his return to Kansas City and his speech there. Of his associates, he noted that "Mr. [Bennett C.] Clark accepted but failed to appear as usual. Told Jim P.

Photocopy of a military circular letter that calls fourteen officers of the 130th Field Artillery to be present at a general court-martial for persons unnamed in the letter. Among these officers are 1st Lieutenant James M. Pendergast, who had previously served with Harry S. Truman in the 129th Field Artillery. The Harry S.

A letter from James M. Pendergast to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Pendergast requests information from Truman pertaining to a rumored rationing of radios and radio equipment due to the war effort. Pendergast seeks this information because he has "some friends here engaged in the wholesale radio distribution business."

The program for the Fourth Annual Mess Call of the Battery "D" 129th Field Artillery, held as a St. Patrick's Day Banquet at the Elks Club in Kansas City, March 17, 1921. The program includes the list of speakers, menu, and lyrics for the songs sung at the event.

Letter from Young Democratic Club of Eastern Jackson County President Jewell B. Hodge to Senator Harry S. Truman. Hodge writes Truman on behalf of Judge Leslie I. George requesting a solution for the political situation currently affecting Independence, Missouri Mayor Roger T. Sermon and James M. Pendergast.

Letter from "Lafe" of Linn, Missouri to Kansas City attorney Fred A. Boxley in which Lafe asks Boxley to offer Truman his congratulations in his senate primary campaign victory. He then describes the political atmosphere in Osage County, Missouri where Republicans are warning of Pendergast influence.

Photocopy of a letter from James M. Pendergast to his wife Kathleen Pendergast. He tells her that he will be traveling to Columbia, Missouri in the morning (July 6, 1934) for Harry S. Truman's senate campaign opening and a State Committee meeting. He then updates Kathleen on his plans for the next week and details of the past few days.

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P.

Photograph showing Tom Pendergast and his nephew James Pendergast. Tom Pendergast is seated, and his nephew standing.

Ca. 1955 Portrait of James Pendergast, Kansas City political faction leader, long-time friend of former President Harry S. Truman From: Michael Pruett.

Letter from Frank E. Thompson to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Thompson informs Truman that he had been let go of his job as a machinist without cause. After attempting to contact James M. Pendergast, he asks for Truman to use his influence to prompt his reinstatement as machinist.

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