Stark, Lloyd C.

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Civic Housekeepers: Women’s Organizations, Civic Reform, and the 1940 Elections

Through the Woman’s City Club, Women’s Forward Kansas City Committee, and other civic organizations, women in Kansas City exemplified the principles of benevolence, reform, and equality in their campaign to oppose the Pendergast machine and eventually replace it in a “clean sweep.” Wielding brooms as potent props symbolizing the clean-up of corruption, and with the campaign slogan, "Ballots and Brooms vs. Bosses and Bullets," the women reformers joined the United Campaign Committee in 1939-1940 to champion an amended city charter and a slate of reform-minded candidates for public office.

Why I Am Supporting James V. "Josh" Billings

Article written by Clare Magee, Unionville attorney, discussing the reasons he supports James Billings for the Missouri Supreme Court. He writes that the only complaints against Billings "have come from those who desired to take advantage of the unfortunate, and who were thwarted in that purpose by Judge Billings."

Unsigned Memo

Unsigned typed document, presumably written by Lloyd Stark. It regards a visit to William Igoe in St. Louis about the feasibility of the author's chances in running for Missouri governor.

United Democracy for Stark

Publication containing excerpts from newspapers throughout the state with endorsements and positive reports for Stark's candidacy for governor.

Truman-Stark-Milligan

Southeastern Missouri newspaper clipping reporting on Governor Lloyd C. Stark's campaign announcement for U.S. Senator of Missouri. The author favors Senator Harry S. Truman for reelection as he is believed to have a better chance of beating a Republican nominee over his Democratic rivals Stark and Maurice M. Milligan. The author then paints a favorable portrait of Truman and tells the reader to not fear his association with Pendergast, saying, "Don't be foolish enough to vote against him [Truman] just because Tom Pendergast was for him.

Truman's First Nomination for Senator was Stolen

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He asserts "[t]he first nomination for United States Senator of Harry S. Truman was stolen," and proceeds to argue that point. The Pendergast machine is described as "the most corrupt, the most brazen, gang of thieves who ever looted an American city," and describes the Pendergasts' businesses' activities and obstructions around the city.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from W. Harold Lane to Charles O'B. Berry

Memorandum from W. Harold Lane, Internal Revenue Service Special Agent, to the Special Agent in Charge (elsewhere identified as Charles O'B. Berry), regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo reports that, in a discussion with Governor Lloyd Stark about the conviction of Charles Gargotta for assault of Sheriff Thomas Bash, Stark stated that he suspected that Pendergast was "directing his political organization" while in prison.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Memo from Robert H. Hudspeth to James V. Bennett

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses allegations that Pendergast was running his political organization during his imprisonment, and and investigation by the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue into the matter.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr

Letter from Mattie Acock to Ruby Carr at the Justice Department regarding Tom Pendergast. Acock writes that Pendergast is a "good man" who gave her husband a job and has been "so good to the poor people," and she hopes he "will get to come home right away. She also writes at length about being poor and her other difficulties. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Mattie Acock to Franklin D. Roosevelt

Letter from Mattie Acock to President Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Acock writes asking for Roosevelt to support Pendergast's parole, and says that Governor Lloyd Stark is mad because Pendergast got former governor Guy B.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from James V. Bennett to Robert H. Hudspeth

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Tom Pendergast Inmate File: Letter from Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf

Letter from Special Agent in Charge Charles O'B. Berry to W. H. Woolf, acting chief of the Intelligence Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Berry addresses the concerns of Governor Lloyd C. Stark that Pendergast was engaged in his political machine while serving his sentence in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, in violation of the terms of his conviction.