Stark, Lloyd C.

Displaying 25 - 36 of 808
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the 1940 election and public reception to Maurice M. Milligan's campaign against Truman. Kitchen then details information he received concerning a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of Andy Murphy and the Union Electric Company.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman of invitation to speak on Truman's behalf at a League of Missouri voters reception. Kitchen believes it is best to decline the offer as it would allow Truman's campaign opponent Lloyd C. Stark to criticize Truman and his connection to the Kansas City organization.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman replies to Kitchen's invitation to speak on Truman's behalf at a League of Missouri voters reception. Truman respectfully disagrees with Kitchen's suggestion to decline the invitation as it might allow Lloyd C. Stark to criticize Truman and his connection to the Kansas City organization. Truman believes that there is nothing for Kitchen nor Dan Carr to hide in their support of Truman.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from L. P. Presler to William A. Kitchen in which Presler responds to Kitchen's letter campaigning on behalf of Truman. After addressing Kitchen as "My Dear Inconsistent Friend", Presler recounts a time when Kitchen tried to convince him to vote for Lloyd C. Stark. Stark then turned on Kitchen and the Kansas City organization. As for Truman, Presler says, "I know you will not experience anything in the future, with him, that you did in the past. He's 100% and of course, you can "sell" me on him.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his upcoming plans and comments on the newspapers' opinion of Lloyd C. Stark': "The K.C. Star, the Post-Dispatch, and the Star-Times in St. Louis are giving Mr. Stark dig after dig. It looks as if their hero has feet of clay (or rotten apples)."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses Truman's victory as Democratic candidate for re-election in the Senate. He then provides suggestions for Truman's fall campaign strategy.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts one man's opinion of the Missouri political climate: "Had a letter from J. John Gillis this morning in which he said the Dems in Mo couldn't win unless Stark was nominated for V.P. He's a crazy Republican lawyer in K.C."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Truman comments on the difficulties of the primary campaign and responds to Kitchens suggestions on the fall campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his visit with Franklin D. Roosevelt and their discussion about Lloyd C. Stark: "Went to see the President about a bill and he insisted on talking Mo. politics and telling me what a funny Governor we have. He didn't say phony but that's what he meant."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.