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Letter from Chas. W. Dickey to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing the influence of the Pendergast machine and Kansas City politics through the state, and thanking him for his work to clean up government. Dickey writes that Stark's work "presages ... a brighter day in Missouri politics [and] will do much to insure honest elections and help clean up a rotten mess of corruption."

Date: 
October 1937

Unsigned letter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, including a clipping from the Kansas City Times, regarding the demand to prosecute violations of election laws. The letter also mentions that Prosecutor Tom Graves intends to marry the widow of John Lazia.

Date: 
June 16th 1937

Letter from Chas. W. Dickey to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing the influence of the Pendergast machine in Greene County, and lauding his work in cleaning up state politics.

Date: 
October 27th 1937

Anonymous letter to Lloyd Stark complaining about an illegal tavern near Rockville, Missouri.

Date: 
September 6th 1937

First page of a multi-page letter to Governor Lloyd Stark, encouraging him to remove R. Emmet O'Malley from his position as Insurance Commissioner.

Date: 
June 6th 1937

Letter from Carrol Olsen of Kansas City to Governor Lloyd Stark, accusing him and Pendergast affiliates of stealing tax money and other Kansas City issues.

Date: 
June 18th 1937

Letter and statement from William Hirth, refuting accusations about his support of Jesse Barrett for Missouri Governor.

Date: 
January 1st 1937

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article entitled "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri" about the corrupt activities of Boss Tom Pendergast of Kansas City.

Date: 
March 6th 1937

Letter from I. N. Watson of Kansas City to Jesse Barrett, describing the status of federal indictments for election fraud in the District Court. He also discusses the pending appointments of new Election Board members.

Date: 
October 2nd 1937

Response letter from Jesse Barrett to I. N. Watson describing his positive reactions to developments in Kansas City, including the prosecutions of election fraud perpetrators and the Governor's appointments to the Election Board.

Date: 
October 23rd 1937

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 15, 1937. Plummer recounts when she was informed that she was fired from her clerical work at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. She then details her attempts at reinstatement by appealing to those close to Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
January 15th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Marie Plummer on January 18, 1937. Mitchell confirms that he sent a letter to Judge Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. He does not believe there is anything he can do in aiding Plummer's reinstatement there and cautions her about making threats. He says, "It would not cost over $50 to have you assassinated, and if you were[,] certainly nothing would be done about it." Mitchell then suggests that she should always be accompanied by someone.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell provides a heated and sometimes vulgar response to Bland's letters of May 14th and 16th, 1937. He asserts that James M. Pendergast influences the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City and that James P. Aylward is "not only hand in glove with the [Pendergast] outfit but is one of its exalted leaders." Mitchell implies that Bland should resign if Marie Plummer is not reinstated in her clerical position at the court.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell continues his heated response by claiming that Bland was only elected because of his father's (Richard P. Bland) reputable civic career. Mitchell asserts that Bland tarnishes his father's memory by not resigning his position from a court allegedly influenced by the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

Date: 
February 2nd 1937

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. In this restrained letter, Bland attempts to undermine the credibility of Marie Plummer and her statements she charged Bland with saying. He then clarifies his position on Plummer's continued employment at the Kansas City Court of Appeals and details the actions he used to try to help her. Bland then asserts again that Mitchell's statements against the machine compromised Plummer's chances of continued employment as deputy clerk.

Date: 
February 2nd 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then shows his political persistence: "If I quit this thing now, they'll say that Kemper and the Boss pulled me off, and I'm going to go through with it if I don't get home at all."

Date: 
November 9th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Date: 
November 28th 1937

Souvenir of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Sisters of Mercy, Kansas City. Included are photographs of Bishop Thomas F. Lillis, Reverend John P. Prendergast, and other local clergy. Also included is a history of the Sisters of Mercy in Kansas City along with building photographs of the First Convent of Mercy in Kansas City and St. Agnes Academy Chapel. Notable political figures paying compliments include the 12th Ward Democratic Club, 10th Ward Democratic Club, Thomas J. Pendergast, James M. Pendergast, and D. M. Nigro.

Date: 
September 2nd 1937

Reproduction of an article from the St. Joseph News-Press from late July or early August 1937 describing Governor Lloyd C. Stark's refusal to reappoint the Kansas City election board and Emmett O'Malley as State Superintendent of Insurance. The author describes Pendergast as "an elderly man who, misguided as that man might be in many of his methods politically, certainly always has kept the faith..."

Date: 
1937

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.