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Displaying 61 - 80 of 106

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to J. W. McCammon. After Mitchell's first letter to McCammon of June 29, 1933, Mitchell provides additional instructions for McCammon in order for him to receive an appointment to Assistant Director of the Federal Home Loan Bank in Springfield, Missouri.

Date: 
June 29th 1934

Letter from C. W. Greenwade to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 30, 1934. Greenwade reports that Maurice M. Milligan, Jacob L. Milligan, et al. would speak with Bennett C. Clark about appointing Greenwade to Post Master.

Date: 
June 30th 1934

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 10, 1934. Hill reports from Kansas City that Frederick Whitten is campaigning against Truman and that John Lazia was shot that previous night.

Date: 
July 10th 1934

Letter from unknown to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 11, 1934. The author recounts John Lazia's death the day previous and provides an opinion on who may be at fault. Lazia's last words are recounted: "If anything is bad with me tell my friend Tom P. [Thomas J. Pendergast] I love him."

Date: 
July 11th 1934

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 18, 1934. Hill reports from Kansas City on a Jacob L. Milligan campaign event, the aftermath of John Lazia's death, and campaign speeches against Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
July 18th 1934

Letter from an unknown author (possibly Martin J. Collins of St. Louis, Missouri) to "Bob" on July 23, 1934, regarding the U.S. Senate race in Missouri. The author comments that Harry S. Truman, John J. Cochran, and Jacob L. Milligan are all campaigning to undecided voters in upstate, rural Missouri.

Date: 
July 23rd 1934

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Charles A. Lee, State Superintendent, Department of Public Schools, on November 19, 1934. Mitchell expresses his condolences that Lee was not renominated as State Superintendent and that a Pendergast-affiliated candidate was elected in his stead.

Date: 
November 19th 1934

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on December 5, 1934. O'Donnell reports that the St. Louis Star decided not to report the information on the Pendergast machine that O'Donnell provided to them. He also comments on the aftermath of the 1934 election and inquires if Mitchell could place him in an administrative position.

Date: 
December 5th 1934

Letter from Edgar Shook to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Shook speaks highly of Russell F. Greiner and Leland Hazard as anti-Pendergast activists in Kansas City, Missouri.

Date: 
December 11th 1934

Letter from Frederick R. Barkhurst to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 18, 1935. Barkhurst praises Mitchell for his stance against Thomas J. Pendergast and encourages Mitchell to run for the next governor of Missouri.

Date: 
June 18th 1935

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 21, 1935. Despite talk in Kansas City of Thomas J. Pendergast's power in Washington D.C., Whitten praises Mitchell for his stance against Pendergast's influence. He comments, "Socialism, Bossism, and gang control have no part in Democratic or American Government, and those of us who have a true concern and regard for the history and accomplishments of the Democratic party cannot help but look with alarm to the future of the party."

Date: 
June 21st 1935

A ten page typewritten history of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.'s political career in relation to Missouri politics through 1935 when the President of the United States removed him from office.

Date: 
1936

Letter from F. M. Kennard to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 1, 1936, regarding the lack of connection between Thomas J. Pendergast and the firm, Bowersock, Fizzel and Rhodes.

Date: 
July 1st 1936

Letter from J. M. Harper to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Harper discusses Thomas J. Pendergast's influence on the 1936 primary election in Missouri.

Date: 
August 6th 1936

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 15, 1937. Plummer recounts when she was informed that she was fired from her clerical work at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. She then details her attempts at reinstatement by appealing to those close to Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
January 15th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Marie Plummer on January 18, 1937. Mitchell confirms that he sent a letter to Judge Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. He does not believe there is anything he can do in aiding Plummer's reinstatement there and cautions her about making threats. He says, "It would not cost over $50 to have you assassinated, and if you were[,] certainly nothing would be done about it." Mitchell then suggests that she should always be accompanied by someone.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell provides a heated and sometimes vulgar response to Bland's letters of May 14th and 16th, 1937. He asserts that James M. Pendergast influences the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City and that James P. Aylward is "not only hand in glove with the [Pendergast] outfit but is one of its exalted leaders." Mitchell implies that Bland should resign if Marie Plummer is not reinstated in her clerical position at the court.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland on January 18, 1937. Mitchell continues his heated response by claiming that Bland was only elected because of his father's (Richard P. Bland) reputable civic career. Mitchell asserts that Bland tarnishes his father's memory by not resigning his position from a court allegedly influenced by the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
January 18th 1937

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1936. In Bland's lengthy response, he explains how the public views Bland and Mitchell to be connected politically, and how Mitchell consistently jeopardizes Bland by attacking the Kansas City organization for Mitchell's own political gain. Because of Bland's diminished political standing and Mitchell's public connection with Marie Plummer, it would be impossible to leverage for her reinstatement without being charged with nepotism.

Date: 
January 20th 1936

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1937. In the matter of Plummer's attempts at reinstatement of her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals, Plummer wishes that Mitchell would have instructed Ewing C. Bland to speak with James P. Aylward on Bland's own behalf. She asserts Bland is using an alibi so that he does not have to help her.

Date: 
January 20th 1936

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.