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Unsigned letter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, including a clipping from the Kansas City Times, regarding the demand to prosecute violations of election laws. The letter also mentions that Prosecutor Tom Graves intends to marry the widow of John Lazia.

Date: 
June 16th 1937

Letter from John Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, concerned about similar violence and intimidation in the upcoming election as has occurred in the past, and encouraging the governor to send the National Guard into Kansas City to ensure enforcement. Smith reports that Machine workers have told him that the last election, where "intimidations, slugging and even killing took place," was "a Sunday School affair compared to what is coming."

Date: 
March 22nd 1938

Letter from Mrs. W. A. Judd, a Kansas City election judge, to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing her concern about corruption and criminality in the upcoming election and requesting additional protection at the polls. She believes "Kansas City has no protection for any one but the criminal element."

Date: 
March 24th 1938

Letter from E. A. Brambwell to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing Jackson County political happenings, including the ouster of Sheriff Williams.

Date: 
May 9th 1939

Letter from Dorman H. O'Leary to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing actions taken against Jackson County politicians including County Prosecutor W. W. Graves and Sheriff James Williams. O'Leary is opposed to the sheriff's ouster and argues that "a grave injustice is being done to the only elected official in the court house who has conducted his office in a proper manner."

Date: 
May 9th 1939

Letter from J. B. Moran to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing increased tax assessments being used as punishment for anti-Machine actions, and city work being used for a reward for pro-Pendergast actions. Moran says that the county "raised the valuation on my home in the sum of $550 as a penalty for my having signed a petition for recall election." The letter also references a suit to remove W. W. Graves, Jr. from office as Jackson County prosecutor.

Date: 
September 22nd 1939

Letter from L. E. Myers to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, stating that Jackson County prosecutor W. W. Graves is corrupt, and accusing him letting rapists and thieves go free in a case for a bribe.

Date: 
February 15th 1940

Letter from Mildred M. Oliver to Lloyd C. Stark, writing with concerns about property remaining with the wife of her murdered attorney and threats she's received from Sheriff Meany. She writes that "T.J. PENDERGAST AND JAMES A FARLEY ARE BOTH JUDAS DEMOCRATS."

Date: 
January 16th 1936

Anonymous letter to Governor Stark alerting him to political scandals in Washington County, Missouri

Date: 
May 3rd 1940

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett describing his attempts to counteract and prosecute voting fraud during the 1936 election in Kansas City.

Date: 
November 29th 1939

Pamphlet written by Ewing Young Mitchell, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce in Franklin D. Roosevelt administration's first term. He first responds to Harry Truman's statement to a reporter that "he never had sought the support of the Pendergast political organization in Missouri" and that the Pendergast machine was not involved in scandal until after he was elected to the Senate.

Date: 
October 1944

Letter from Bennett C. Clark to James A. Reed. Clark suggests that Reed convinces Pendergast to support Elmer Jones instead of H. O. Maxey or Gene Nelson as Missouri Speaker of the House.

Date: 
December 20th 1930

Special Commissioner's Report by Leon P. Embry for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent.

Date: 
April 6th 1940

Information provided by Prosecuting Attorney W. W. Graves for Criminal Case No. 34750: State of Missouri vs. John Gadwood. Graves charges Gadwood with the murder of Lee Flacy on May 27, 1934. The alleged murder occured "during a city election in Kansas City at a restuarant located at 5824 Swope Parkway, two doors from the polling place for the 25th precinct of the 16th ward." [Taken from a Opinion from the Supreme Court of Missouri.] Gadwood was the "rabbit" faction ward leader and Flacy was a "goat" faction precinct captain.

Date: 
1934

Court Opinion by Judge George R. Ellison for Criminal Case No. 34750: State of Missouri vs. John Gadwood, Appellant. Upon reviewing the assignments of error in Gadwood's motion for a new trial, Ellison affirms that Gadwood was guilty of murdering Lee Flacy on March 27, 1934. The alleged murder occurred "during a city election in Kansas City at a restaurant located at 5824 Swope Parkway, two doors from the polling place for the 25th precinct of the 16th ward." Gadwood was the "rabbit" faction ward leader and Flacy was a "goat" faction precinct captain.

Date: 
December 17th 1937

Excerpt of the full transcript of the record for Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. In the included indictment, Prosecuting Attorney W. W. Graves charges Richetti with the murder of Frank Hermanson on June 17, 1933.

Date: 
1935

Order to Show Cause for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. This document accuses Graves of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Missouri Supreme Court Clerk E. F. Elliot orders Graves to come before the court and answer to these allegations.

Date: 
June 6th 1939

Court Opinion by Judge Charles Thomas Hays for Case for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. Hays finds Graves guilty of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Hays provides some of the evidence used in making his decision.

Date: 
September 3rd 1940

First issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a statement on the newspaper's objective, maintaining that the newspaper is not against any certain political party or vice, but that it is simply for "good government". Featured articles include: “Council Passes Cab Ordinance” (pp. 2 & 4) discussing councilman Frank H. Backstrom’s reaction to the ordinance and detailing other ordinances appropriating bond funds.; "Adult Education--A Fine Work" (pp.

Date: 
January 11th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about President Franklin D. Roosevelt and “Tommy Wommy” Pendergast’s insistence on standing by the president, as well as other local leaders such as Truman and Shannon’s diplomatic efforts with the federal government. Portraits of of FDR and Pendergast are included. Other featured articles include: “Little Merchants” (p. 2), about children employed to sell magazines being exempt from state child labor laws; “President’s Birthday Funds (p.

Date: 
January 25th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.