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Mugshot for John J. Pryor, Inmate #56309. Pryor was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for tax evasion.

Date: 
January 19th 1940

Record of court commitment for John J. Pryor, Inmate #56309, which includes the charges against him and sentence he received, lists his wife as his emergency contact, and records his parole in February 1941. Pryor was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for tax evasion.

Date: 
January 19th 1940

Preliminary social abstract for John J. Pryor, Inmate #56309, which records his family background, childhood, educational and economic status, and post-parole plans. Pryor was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for tax evasion.

Date: 
January 19th 1940

Admission summary for John J. Pryor, Inmate #56309, which includes his family background, health and economic status, and makes custodial, educational, and work duty recommendations. Pryor was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for tax evasion.

Date: 
January 26th 1940

Parole progress report for John J. Pryor, Inmate #56309, which includes his prior employment, mental and physical health, visitors, and post-parole plans. Pryor was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for tax evasion.

Date: 
June 26th 1940

Letter from Stanley R. Fike, treasurer of Inter-City Press, Inc., regarding the parole of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, owner of the business. Fike writes that Higgins was an engaged boss and states that he is proud "proud to say I am his friend." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
August 31st 1940

Parole progress report for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which includes details about his physical and psychological health, plans for life after parole, details about family, work, and economic history, and other factors. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
May 15th 1940

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records Higgins' defense attorney, summarizes the charges, and notes the sentence imposed. The report notes that the income Higgins is charged with evading taxes on was received from "protected gamblers and other forms of organized vice." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps recommends against parole, while Judge J. C.

Date: 
May 13th 1940

Prison record of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which includes sentencing dates and terms as well as work and cell assignments. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
1940

U.S. Attorney's report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, recording Higgins' defense attorney, summarizing the charges, and noting that "the aggravating circumstances are that the income unreported by this prisoner was derived form the lowest and worst elements of the organized underworld of Kansas City." U.S. Attorney Richard K. Phelps reports that local mobster Charles Carollo is a suspected associate, and recommends against parole. Judge J. C. Collet does not concur, noting that this conviction is Higgins' first offense.

Date: 
June 3rd 1940

Parole progress report for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which includes testing results, a mention of his "super intelligence" and "excellent personality," his "fair general health," and a note that he "wishes whole-heartedly that he had never become involved in politics." Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
April 23rd 1940

Application for parole from Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which states that he is eligible for parole on July 2, 1940, and which includes work plans upon release from prison and proposing a parole advisor. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
May 15th 1940

Confidential work report to the United States Board of Parole for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, describing his work in the Multigraph Room has been good, and that his character can be described as trustworthy, friendly, pleasant, energetic, and faithful. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
March 16th 1940

FBI report on Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, listing charges against him and sentence he received. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
July 20th 1940

Prison record of Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which includes sentencing dates and terms and notes his conditional release on May 30, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
May 30th 1940

Certificate of Conditional Release for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, stating that Pendergast is receiving a reduction of 90 days from his original sentence on the condition that a fine of $10,000 and past due income taxes are paid. The document also lists Lewis J. Grout as Pendergast's probation officer, and includes a receipt noting the $10,000 fine was paid on April 29, 1940. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Date: 
May 30th 1940

Conditional release statement for Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, detailing his intention to return to living with his wife and family, and return to his work at Ready-Mixed Concrete, upon his release from prison. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
March 26th 1940

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks writes that "our friend, Frank Smith, is very anxious to visit" Pendergast before his release from prison, just one month in the future, and inquiring as to whether this would be possible. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
April 4th 1940

Memorandum from Robert H. Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, to James V. Bennett, director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The memo discusses Pendergast assigning his lawyers power of attorney to deal with his income tax liability with the Treasury Department, and lists Pendergast's visitor log, including attorneys and Treasury Department agents. The memo also notes that Pendergast has paid "a substantial portion" of his back taxes owed. Also included is a letter of introduction from Charles O'B.

Date: 
January 19th 1940

Letter from James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to Robert Hudspeth, warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Bennett writes regarding allegations made by Governor Lloyd Stark that Pendergast "was directing his political organization from Leavenworth," and his discussion about that issue with Elmer Irey, who works in Treasury Department law enforcement. Irey concluded that Stark was misinformed, and that Pendergast was not engaged in political activity from prison.

Date: 
January 25th 1940

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.