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Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman states that he does not believe that a Missouri judge will be appointed for the new position on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. However, Truman welcomes Kitchen's help to appoint Missourian Charlie Carr.

Date: 
February 7th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman comments on the appointment for a new judge on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. He states, "I think the longer we wait on this thing the better off we are going to be."

Date: 
February 18th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman informs Kitchen that he recommended Mrs. Gene Warner for a position with the Commodity Credit Corporation.

Date: 
April 21st 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman encloses a letter he had just written to Robert Walton of the Armstrong Herald in Armstrong, Missouri. In this letter, Truman thanks Walton for a favorable article Walton wrote about Truman.

Date: 
June 2nd 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman addresses issues in the Missouri Democratic Party. He says that he is unable to help solve these problems as his federal work consumes his day.

Date: 
July 21st 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman thanks Kitchen for his intelligence and analysis on current state politics in Missouri.

Date: 
September 8th 1941

Photocopy of a letter from Harry S. Truman to James M. Pendergast in which Truman discusses property matters concerning Fred Klaber and Russell Gabriel. The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum does not hold the original document.

Date: 
August 8th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to James D. Pouncey of The Jackson County Bar Association. Truman criticizes the bar for endorsing Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Walter White in not accepting Truman's invitation to appear before the Truman Committee. Truman states, "We had no funds available to bring a trainload of Negroes here to testify, and that is what White wanted us to do."

Date: 
July 26th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Eddie Meisburger of the Kansas City Journal. After Meisburger updates Truman on how the Pendergast organization may be able to provide Meisburger's father with continued employment, Truman responds. He tells Meisburger, "I have just written Fred Klaber about your Dad, and I hope it works out all right."

Date: 
June 18th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Frank E. Thompson in which Truman suggests Thompson to talk to his Pendergast Democratic Club Ward Boss Tommy Fitzgerald in order to get his job back as a machinist.

Date: 
April 15th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Kansas City realtor Myron A. King in which Truman succinctly expresses his hope that the plans for a new Kansas City airport turn out favorably.

Date: 
June 16th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Executive Manager of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Geroge W. Catts. Truman confirms receipt of a Kansas City manufacturing report sent by Catts and Truman expresses his surprise in the outcome of the report.

Date: 
October 17th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant III. Truman introduces Mr. C. M. Woodard, Industrial Commissioner of the Chamber of Commerce in Kansas City, Missouri, and Mr. E. C. Zachman, Director of the Kansas City Municipal Auditorium, both of which are developing a exposition in Kansas City in order to promote federal defense manufacturing there.

Date: 
September 10th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Shannon C. Douglass in which Truman informs Douglass that he has met with Lou Holland. Holland recommends that "Kansas City take over both air plane landing fields - the one at Grandview and also the one at Greenwood."

Date: 
June 3rd 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Grandview, Missouri Mayor Gared H. Murray in which Truman informs Murray that he has met with Lou Holland. Holland recommends that "Kansas City take over both air plane landing fields - the one at Grandview and also the one at Greenwood."

Date: 
June 3rd 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Kansas City attorney Joe W. McQueen. Truman agrees with McQueen in his desire to outfit the Fairfax Aviation School with the proper educational equipment to prepare workmen for employment in federal defense manufacturing. Truman comments that, "I should think they would need it worse now than any other time."

Date: 
May 28th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Kansas City City Manager L. P. Cookingham. Truman agrees with Cookingham in his desire to facilitate a new Kansas City airport and encourages Cookingham to pursue the landed needed for its development.

Date: 
May 22nd 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Executive Manager of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Geroge W. Catts. After Catts informs Truman that Kansas City steel companies could be utilized to aid in the construction of 200 aquatic ships, Truman agrees and comments "There isn't a reason in the world why that could not be done."

Date: 
January 10th 1941

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to T. B. Good, secretary of the Missouri Legislative Board of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen. After receipt of Good's endorsement of Judge Jacob E. Smith of Sedalia, Missouri, Truman comments that "I am happy to know of your good opinion of Judge Smith."

Date: 
August 7th 1941

A letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to J. C. Nichols. Truman thanks Nichols for attaching the letter Nichols wrote to Senator Arthur Capper concerning the dispersement of federal jobs throughout the United States.

Date: 
August 11th 1941

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.