Truman, Bess Wallace

Displaying 1 - 12 of 108
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this particularly revealing letter, Truman provides a detailed update on politics in Jackson County and says, "I have talked to T.J. [Tom Pendergast] and to Jim [James Pendergast] over the phone. T.J. is much better and gave me to understand that I could do as I pleased with the county."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Willard Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on his new prospects, saying that, "Tomorrow I'm to see Senator Clark and Mr. Burr and the rest and really make up my mind on what I'm to do."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Independence, Missouri to his wife Bess in Biloxi, Mississippi. In this letter, Truman provides a short update on politics in Kansas City and says, "The Star seems to be softening up somewhat but they have planted a lot of poison."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel to Fort Riley and on his new entitlements there as a lieutenant colonel.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman recounts his conversation with the general (presumably of the United States Army Reserve), saying that, "He always kids me about my political career and I tell him if there weren't politicians to run the government, he would not be a brigadier general. That usually stops the conversation...".

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Hotel Gibbons in Dayton, Ohio to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel east to Dayton and then speaks about the newly erected Liberty Memorial: "...Will Rogers says it looks like a silo. Other people have the right slant on R.A. Long's monument to himself as well as us perverted people who only fought the war behind a gun."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman comments on Lloyd C. Stark running for the Senate while still the governor of Missouri. Truman then reflects on his past influence in Kansas City: "My patronage troubles were the result of the rotten situation in Kansas City and also the jealous disposition of my colleague. While the President is unreliable, the things he's stood for are, in my opinion, best for the country, and jobs should not interfere with general principles."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman expresses his distaste for social functions, commenting that "I don't do things for people for a reward, if I did I ought to be rich. I do it because I like to do it, but if they just keep harping on it I get sick of it."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman shows his commitment to the state and his ideals: "I went into the R.R. business again today and I think got some more real information. I have a notion it didn't please Mr. [William T.] Kemper [Sr.] very much. But I can't help it. I'm not working for him. I'm working for Missouri."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.