McElroy, Henry F.

Displaying 85 - 96 of 98
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett discussing the recent Kansas City election, and the landcape of fraudulent voting and corruption which persists, despite recent reforms.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Charles Matthews to Claude Lambert asserting that Lloyd Stark will not be beholden to Tom Pendergast's interests, regardless of garnering his endorsement. This letter is a near replica of SHSMO-C0004-F08113-0001.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter to Claude Lambert asserting that gubernatorial candidate Lloyd Stark is not beholden or affiliated to the Kansas City political machine, and making complimentary remarks about Matthew S. Murray and Henry McElroy.

Genre: 
Clippings
Correspondence

Clipping and brief note encouraging Gov. Stark to crack down on illegal gambling and slot machines in Kansas City. The clipping quotes city manager Henry McElroy as saying he'll feed a Stark Brothers' Nursery Golden Delicious apple to his dog.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. William Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning the inadequacy of police protection in past Kansas City elections and other political and economic problems in the city. He also writes that he "would like to add ... that this is the most Wide 'open' town I was ever in."

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Complaint for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. In this document, Thomas J. Layson calls upon the court to charge the defendants with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy. Layson also charges the defendants with ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Warrant to Apprehend for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. This document calls for the arrest of the defendants charged with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy, and ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

Genre: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. The defendants are charged with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy, and ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

Genre: 
Clippings

A reprint of an article clipped from defunct Kansas City newspaper, The Kansas City American. This clipping documents the shift in local and national politics in which black voters begin to support Democratic candidates. Felix H. Payne and the Central United Democratic Committee provides an endorsement for Judge James V. Billings for Judge of the Supreme Court, urging readers to "join us August 2, [1938,] primary election day, to go to the polls in your community..."

Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On June 17, 1933, four law enforcement officers and their prisoner, Frank Nash, were fatally wounded in a botched rescue attempt outside Union Station. The story of the Union Station Massacre, as it became known, centered on Frank Nash, who had been convicted of three separate crimes of a serious nature: murder, armed burglary, and then assault.

Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

One of Kansas City's most sensational and ultimately tragic crimes began on May 27, 1933 with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, the daughter of controversial city manager Henry F. McElroy, who had close ties to the political machine operated by “Boss” Tom Pendergast. She was released after 34 hours of captivity, following payment of a $30,000 ransom, but she never recovered from the emotional turmoil that ensued.

Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

Nell Donnelly and her chauffeur, George Blair, were kidnapped on December 16, 1931. Donnelly had become famous after her 1916 founding of the Donnelly Garment Company, which sold stylish but affordable dresses for daily wear by ordinary women. Backed by the sales of “Nelly Don’s,” as the dresses became known, the company grew into a multi-million dollar business with over 1,000 employees in the 1920s.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.