Correspondence

Displaying 169 - 180 of 1670

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, May 16, 1938

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen updates Truman on General Joe Keenan's visit to Kansas City on May 14, 1938. As requested by Truman, Kitchen mentioned to Keenan that Fred Canfill would be an excellent pick for U.S. Marshall at Kansas City. Kitchen reports that Keenan agrees with such pick and that "Mr. Pendergast would greatly appreciate this appointment."

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, May 14, 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides supplementary information on investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen provides more intel on Duncan, his plans, and on John T. Burkett, a colleague of Duncan's that "is building a fire under him."

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, May 12, 1936

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen describes in detail an investigation by Harvey L. Duncan concerning an alleged theft of an interstate shipment of liquor. Kitchen warns against a conspiracy charge, which would reflect poorly on the Kansas City organization. Thus, he suggests that any suspect be tried separately, and not as co-conspirators in a large scheme. In order to do this, Kitchen recommends Truman has Bennett C. Clark call Maurice M. Milligan and request that Milligan prosecutes violators separately.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, March 27, 1940

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses what may be done to facilitate the placement of a Missouri judge to the Eight Circuit Court of Appeals.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, March 25, 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, June 18, 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides suggestions on how to secure Charlie Carr as the new judge of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen suggests Truman talks to his close friends, Senator Byrnes and Attorney General Jackson, both of which are recent appointments to the Supreme Court. Kitchen provides reasons why Byrnes and Jackson might want to help them in their efforts.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, January 26, 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases. Kitchen then recommends Charlie Carr for the position and asks Truman to pass this recommendation on to Bennett C. Clark and President Roosevelt.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, February 18, 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen warns that Democrats might have a difficult election in 1940 because of recent events in Congress. Kitchen suggests that Truman address some of these issues ahead of the 1940 campaign. Included is a reproduction of an article from the Armstrong Herald on February 16, 1939.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, February 14, 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen provides intelligence that if a Missourian were to be appointed as a new judge on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, it would be Charlie Carr. Kitchen refuses to give up on the endeavor as it may be June 1941 before the position is filled.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, December 7, 1937

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen suggests a way in which Truman can put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City. Kitchen proposes that the President could appoint a new attorney of Truman's choosing, but keep Milligan as a special prosecutor for the Kansas City voter fraud cases. By doing so, Truman can control the placement without the Kansas City newspapers accusing him of trying to suppress the prosecution of voter fraud.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, December 12, 1941

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen updates Truman on the recent "Democratic pow-wow" in Jefferson City, Missouri.

From William A. Kitchen to Harry S. Truman, August 9, 1935

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen encourages Truman to give K. E. Long of Newburg, Missouri a job under Mr. Murray. Kitchen finds Long to be "well connected politically in Phelps County and I am, therefore, extremely anxious that he be placed on the payroll at the earliest possible date."