Court Cases

Prohibition & Vice

Title Description Year
Donnelly Garment Company vs. International Ladies Garment Workers Union, et al.: Plaintiff's Exhibit No. 132: Lottie Conroy Death Certificate

Death certificate for Lottie Conroy issued by the Missouri State Board of Health. She died on March 24, 1934, and her cause of death is listed as second and third degree burns resulting from her clothing catching fire.

January 1, 1934
Kansas City Star vs. Milton Morris and Eddie Spitz: Petition on Account

Petition on Account for Case No. 445951: The Kansas City Star Company, a Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. Milton Morris and Eddie Spits [Edward “Eddie Spitz” Osadchey], Defendants. The Kansas City Star asserts that Morris and Osadchey owe "the sum of $150.96 for advertising published and circulated at the request of the defendants and each of them in the Kansas City Star and Kansas City Times."

Missouri ex rel. Cameron L. Orr vs. Leannah Kearns, alias Annie Chambers: Judgment and Order Allowing Appeal

Judgment and Order Allowing Appeal by Clerk W. H. Harper for Case No. 24023: State of Missouri ex rel. Cameron L. Orr, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent, vs. Leannah Kearns, Alias Annie Chambers, Appellant. The judgment finds Chambers guilty of maintaining a house of prostitution at the southwest corner of 3rd Street and Wyandotte Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The judgment prohibits Chambers or her associates from ever operating this premise as a brothel and closes the building for a period of two months.

January 1, 1922
Missouri ex rel. Cameron L. Orr vs. Leannah Kearns, alias Annie Chambers: Opinion

Court Opinion by Commissioner James D. Lindsay for Case No. 24023: State of Missouri ex rel. Cameron L. Orr, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent, vs. Leannah Kearns, Alias Annie Chambers, Appellant. Accepting Chambers' appeal, Lindsay examines the validity of the injunction that was filed against Chambers, "restraining the defendant from maintaining a nuisance by conducting or keeping a bawdy house or house of assignation." Lindsay provides a detailed account of the premise in question and its inhabitants, and recalls a quote of one of the witnesses, saying "I went in the rear room and there was a girl in there and a man... the girl was all naked except - what do you call them - teddy bears." Lindsay concludes that the injunction should be affirmed, but reverses the order that the premise be closed for any use.

January 1, 1924
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Defendant's Exhibit H

Government Identification Order for Robert G. Brady, used in support of the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. Brady's aliases include Bob Brady, Pat Brady, J. H. Taylor, and Bob Ross and is described as 29 years old, 6'1.5", 187 lbs., with large build, black to gray hair, brown eyes, and dark complexion.

January 1, 1933
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Defendant's Exhibit I

Government Identification Order for Robert G. Brady, used in support of the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. Brady's aliases include Bob Brady, Pat Brady, J. H. Taylor, and Bob Ross and is described as 29 years old, 6'1.5", 187 lbs., with large build, black to gray hair, brown eyes, and dark complexion.

January 1, 1933
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Defendant's Exhibit J

Government Identification Order for Bernard Phillips, used in support of the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. Phillips is also known as B. A. Courtney and is described as 38 years old, 5'8", 203 lbs., stout, chestnut black hair, azure light eyes, and light complexion.

January 1, 1933
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Defendant's Exhibit K

Government Identification Order for Harvey J. Bailey, used in support of the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. Bailey's other aliases include J. J. Brennan and John Brown and is described as 45 years old, 5'11", 180 lbs., with large build, black to gray hair, brown eyes, and dark complexion.

January 1, 1933
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Defendant's Exhibit L

Kansas City Police Department miscellaneous report of the Union Station Massacre, used in support of the defendant in Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. The report provides a summary of the incident from the perspective of FBI agent T. J. Lackey, who was present during the shooting.

January 1, 1933
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Full Transcript of the Record, Excerpt

Excerpt of the full transcript of the record for Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti. In the included indictment, Prosecuting Attorney W. W. Graves charges Richetti with the murder of Frank Hermanson on June 17, 1933.

January 1, 1935
Missouri vs. Adam Richetti: Opinion

Court Opinion by Judge George R. Ellison for Criminal Case No. 35160: State of Missouri vs. Adam Richetti, Appellant. Upon reviewing the assignments of error in Richetti's motion for a new trial, Ellison affirms that Richetti was guilty of murdering Frank Hermanson on June 17, 1933 as part of the Union Station Massacre. Ellison further affirms Richetti's death penalty and orders its administration with lethal gas, at the Missouri State Penitentiary in Jefferson City, Missouri.

January 1, 1938
Missouri vs. Cyreal Daugherty: Respondent's Statement, Abstract of the Record and Brief

Respondent's Statement, Abstract of the Record and Brief for Case No. 25240: State of Missouri, Respondent, vs. Cyreal Daugherty, Appellant. In this document, the Supreme Court of Missouri finds that Daugherty's guilty verdict is sufficient based on the given evidence. He was charged with ten years of imprisonment for robbing Ray E. Shore of $2,436 on June 24, 1922.

January 1, 1924
Missouri vs. John Gadwood: Information

Information provided by Prosecuting Attorney W. W. Graves for Criminal Case No. 34750: State of Missouri vs. John Gadwood. Graves charges Gadwood with the murder of Lee Flacy on May 27, 1934. The alleged murder occured "during a city election in Kansas City at a restuarant located at 5824 Swope Parkway, two doors from the polling place for the 25th precinct of the 16th ward." [Taken from a Opinion from the Supreme Court of Missouri.] Gadwood was the "rabbit" faction ward leader and Flacy was a "goat" faction precinct captain. This document is an excerpt of the full trial transcript.

January 1, 1934
Missouri vs. John Gadwood: Opinion

Court Opinion by Judge George R. Ellison for Criminal Case No. 34750: State of Missouri vs. John Gadwood, Appellant. Upon reviewing the assignments of error in Gadwood's motion for a new trial, Ellison affirms that Gadwood was guilty of murdering Lee Flacy on March 27, 1934. The alleged murder occurred "during a city election in Kansas City at a restaurant located at 5824 Swope Parkway, two doors from the polling place for the 25th precinct of the 16th ward." Gadwood was the "rabbit" faction ward leader and Flacy was a "goat" faction precinct captain.

January 1, 1937
Missouri vs. John Messino: Opinion

Court Opinion by Commissioner James A. Cooley for Case No. 30195: State of Missouri, Respondent, vs. John Messino, Appellant. After considering Messino's appeal, Cooley affirms the initial judgment that Messino is guilty of killing traffic officer James H. Smith on June 14, 1928 after Messino and six other men stole $19,000 from Home Trust Company at 1117-19 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1930
Missouri vs. Maurice W. Nagle: Opinion

Court Opinion by Commissioner Berryman Henwood for Case No. 30588: State of Missouri, Respondent, vs. Maurice W. Nagle, Appellant. After considering Nagle's appeal, Henwood reverses the initial judgment finding Nagle guilty of killing traffic officer James H. Smith on June 14, 1928 after Messino and six other men stole $19,000 from Home Trust Company at 1117-19 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Missouri. Henwood discharges Nagle because the commissioner states that there is no evidence that Nagle participated in the murder or robbery. Included in the opinion is an excerpt of a transcript between Nagle and Jackson County Prosecuting Attorney James R. Page.

January 1, 1930
Missouri vs. Oscar Rowe: Opinion

Court Opinion by Commissioner Walter N. Davis for Criminal Case No. 30129: State of Missouri vs. Oscar Rowe, Appellant. Kansas City Republican Precinct Captain Oscar Rowe was found guilty of giving corn whiskey to Arch Duncan as part of a larger scheme to deprive Democratic voters from voting in the November 6, 1928 presidential election. Rowe operated an establishment at 602 Main Street, Kansas City, MO that was licensed as a soft drink parlor and cigar store, but was in fact an establishment of gambling, prostitution, and illegal liquor consumption. The evidence shows that in collaboration with the Republican run Kansas City Police Department, Rowe and his associates "would lift the heads of the drunken men in the basement and pour whiskey down their throats. Some two hundred men were in the basement in all stages of intoxication. Some were pitifully drunk and lying on the floor. The valuables of those lured into the place were taken and retained. Around 2 o’clock A. M. on November 6, 1928, the police wagons arrived. The wagons were used to convey the drunken men found in the basement to the holdover. No charges were preferred against them." The court finds that the appellant's motion for a new trial is without merit and that Rowe's verdict of five years in a penitentiary is affirmed.

January 1, 1930
Missouri vs. Peter DiGiovanni and Joseph DiGiovanni: Application to Amend Answers

Application of Peter DiGiovanni and Joseph DiGiovanni, to amend answers to questions 6 and 6(a) in the last long form application for a license to operate a wholesale liquor business, dated July 1, 1946 and July 1, 1947. The DiGiovanni brothers assert that they did not know the questions were incomplete and incorrect because they can not read the English language. The application answers these questions by providing an account of their previous convictions of illegal liquor possession during Prohibition.

January 1, 1950
Missouri vs. Peter DiGiovanni and Joseph DiGiovanni: From Salvino Zanon to the Court

Letter from Pastor Salvino Zanon to the court in Case No. 548628: Missouri vs. Peter DiGiovanni and Joseph DiGiovanni. Zanon attests that the two DiGiovanni brothers are charitable and of high moral character. Zanon believes, "they should not be deprived of their business just because of what may have happened many and many years ago, or because of politics, or propaganda."

January 1, 1950
Missouri vs. Peter DiGiovanni and Joseph DiGiovanni: Transcript

Transcript of the application to suspend or revoke the license of Peter and Joseph DiGiovanni, doing business as Midwest Distributing Company, 1109 Cherry Street, Kansas City, Missouri in Case No. 548628: Missouri vs. Peter DiGiovanni and Joseph DiGiovanni. The document includes transcripts of Joseph and Peter testifying before Assistant Attorney General Hugh P. Williamson and includes many details of their liquor distributing activity during and after Prohibition.

January 1, 1950
Missouri vs. Waller W. Graves: Opinion

Court Opinion by Judge Charles Thomas Hays for Case for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. Hays finds Graves guilty of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Hays provides some of the evidence used in making his decision. Graves is thus removed from his office of prosecuting attorney of Jackson County and fined $1000.

January 1, 1940
Missouri vs. Waller W. Graves: Order to Show Cause

Order to Show Cause for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. This document accuses Graves of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Missouri Supreme Court Clerk E. F. Elliot orders Graves to come before the court and answer to these allegations.

January 1, 1939
Missouri vs. Waller W. Graves: Special Commissioner's Report

Special Commissioner's Report by Leon P. Embry for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. Embry presents his findings of fact and conclusion of law in which he discusses "whether or not a public officer may be removed or ousted from office during one term because of misconduct or derelictions occurring during a prior term, or prior terms, of office." Embry discusses in detail a case in which Graves allegedly dismissed improperly: State v. Gargotta in which Gargotta was charged with assault with the intent to murder Thomas B. Bash, sheriff of Jackson County. Embry also discusses Graves' handling of election law violations in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. It is this latter incident that Embry finds Graves guilty of dereliction of duty as Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1940
Missouri vs. Walter H. McGee: Opinion

Court Opinion by Commissioner Walter H. Bohling for Criminal Case No. 33947: State of Missouri vs. Walter H. McGee, Appellant. Upon reviewing the assignments of error in McGee's motion for a new trial, Bohling affirms that McGee was guilty of kidnapping Mary McElroy on May 27, 1933 and holding her for ransom. Mary was the daughter of Henry F. McElroy, City Manager of Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1935
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Answer to Petition in Equity

An answer to the petition in equity for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. In this answer, Howell denies the plaintiff’s claims and “prays that the decision and order of the defendant as said Prohibition Director be affirmed and that plaintiff’s petition be dismissed at plaintiff’s cost.”

January 1, 1920
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Motion and Orders to Reinstate Case

One motion and two orders for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. In these documents, the plaintiff motions to reinstate the case in equity and the court orders the same.

January 1, 1922
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Petition in Equity and Attached Exhibits

A petition in equity and attached exhibits for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. In this petition, T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company asks the court to settle a dispute with Howell, who issued the company an order “that [their liquor] permit… is revoked and canceled.” The petitioner reaffirms “that it at all times in good faith conformed to the provisions of the National Prohibition Act.”

January 1, 1920
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Subpoena in Chancery

A subpoena in chancery for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. This subpoena commands Howell to be present at the U.S. District Court in Kansas City on December 23, 1920 to answer for the claims made by the T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company.

January 1, 1920
U.S. vs. Adam Richetti: Capias

Capias for Criminal Case No. 12777: United States vs. Adam Richetti, Defendant. This document orders law enforcement to apprehend Richetti for assaulting state and federal officers and attempting to free Frank Nash from custody as part of the Union Station Massacre.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Adam Richetti: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12777: United States vs. Adam Richetti, Defendant. Richetti is charged with assaulting state and federal officers and attempting to free Frank Nash from custody as part of the Union Station Massacre.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Adam Richetti: Order to Dismiss Case

Order for Criminal Case No. 12777: United States vs. Adam Richetti, Defendant. This document dismisses the case as Richetti is dead.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Angelo Troyer: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 8559: United States vs. Angelo Troyer, defendant. The document notes that Troyer was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Angelo Troyer: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8559: United States vs. Angelo Troyer, defendant. Troyer was charged with, in Count I, possessing unregistered distilling equipment, i.e. a 50-gallon whiskey still; in Count II, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, operating a "distilling apparatus" inside a dwelling at 617 Holmes Street in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Angelo Troyer: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8559: United States vs. Angelo Troyer, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on February 21, 1928, witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys representing each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley ordered a recognizance of $2000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Anthony Cassata and Lena Cassata: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 12381: United States vs. Anthony Cassata, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the addition of Cassata's wife Lena to the charges, the defendant's arrest on September 11, 1933 and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner James S. Summers held that Gargotta was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $2,000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on September 11, 1933. A note on the report indicates that Lena Cassata pleaded guilty to her charge, but was sentenced to serve two years in another case.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Anthony Cassata: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 12381: United States vs. Anthony Cassata, defendant. Cassata was charged in multiple counts: in Count I, with selling 12 grains of morphine to William and Margaret Wells, "not from the original stamped package ... and upon which the tax had not been paid"; in Count II, knowingly selling the 12 grains morphine that had been "unlawfully imported and brought into the United States"; in Count III, selling to Margaret Wells 242 grains of morphine out of the original packaging and untaxed; and in Count IV, selling that quantity of morphine knowing that it was unlawfully imported into the country.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Arthur L. Curran and Manning Wilcox: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6472: United States vs. Arthur L. Curran and Manning Wilcox, defendants. The defendants were serving as Federal Prohibition Agents in Kansas City, Missouri, and are charged with conspiring to conduct raids on individuals suspected of violating the Prohibition Act and then extort those individuals for cash payments to avoid arrest and receive protection from future interference in their distillation, possession, or sale of alcohol. The case was dismissed by order of District Judge Albert L. Reeves in November 1927.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Arthur L. Curran and Manning Wilcox: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6473: United States vs. Arthur L. Curran and Manning Wilcox, defendants. The defendants were serving as Federal Prohibition Agents in Kansas City, Missouri, and are charged with conspiring to conduct raids on individuals suspected of violating the Prohibition Act and then extort those individuals for cash payments to avoid arrest and receive protection from future interference in their distillation, possession, or sale of alcohol. The case was dismissed by order of District Judge Albert L. Reeves in November 1927.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. B. E. Rector: Commitment

Commitment of B. E. Rector in the trial of Criminal Case No. 8046: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The document notes that Rector was charged with violating Section 37 of the Penal Code, and thus committed to the Jackson County Jail in default of his bond. Rector was delivered to the jailer of the Jackson County Jail on December 5, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Bob Rippen, Frank Malloy, Joseph L. Tingle, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 9019: United States vs. Bob Rippen, Frank (Fritz) Malloy, Joseph L. Tingle, Tom Fitzgibbons (alias Thomas Church), Edward Hohmann, Emma Amsler (alias Helen E. Johnson), and Elmer Hoard, Earl Tingle, J. J. Fields and Dewey Bardone, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiracy to commit Prohibition Act violations, including the manufacture, possession, and sale of 1250 gallons of beer, as well as possession of brewing equipment.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Buster Balestrere: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 13387: United States vs. Buster Balestrere, defendant. The order, signed by Judge Albert L. Reeves, orders Balestrere's sentence of probation be shortened due to good behavior. Balestrere entered a plea of guilty to his charges and ended up spending two and a half years on probation rather than his original sentence of five years.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Carl Civella: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14700: United States vs. Carl Civella, defendant. Civella was charged with selling 187 grains of morphine hydrocloride, "derivative of opium," outside of the original packaging and without proper tax having been paid. In a second count, he is also charged with having purchased the 187 grains of morphine. The purchase and sale both took place near 12th and Vine. A third count charges that Civella did "receive, conceal, buy and sell ... facilitate the transportation, concealment and sale after importation" of 187 grains of morphine that had been illegally brought into the country.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Carl Civella: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14700: United States vs. Carl Civella, defendant. Civella entered a plea of guilty entered a plea of guilty to count two, and was sentenced to one year and one day in the penitentiary. The United States entered nolle prosequi to counts one and three of the indictment.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti: Capias

Capias for Criminal Case No. 12697: United States vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti, Defendants. This document orders law enforcement to apprehend Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd and Adam Richetti.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti: Capias

Capias for Criminal Case No. 12697: United States vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti, Defendants. This document orders law enforcement to apprehend Adam Richetti.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12697: United States vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti, Defendants. They are charged with the theft of an automobile in connection with the Union Station Massacre.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti: Order to Dismiss Case

Order for Criminal Case No. 12697: United States vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti, Defendants. This document dismisses the case as both defendants are dead.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti: Order to Reinstate Case

Order for Criminal Case No. 12697: United States vs. Charles Arthur Floyd and Adam Richetti, Defendants. This document reinstates the case now that Adam Richetti has been apprehended.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Application for Bill of Particulars

Application for bill of particulars in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant, stating that specific matters in the indictment are "vague, indefinite, uncertain, ambiguous, equivocal, and contradictory." The document requests more names, locations, and other details of the "gambling parlors" and "gambling games" that Carrollo is accused of profiting from.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Application for Bill of Particulars

Application for bill of particulars in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant, stating that specific matters in the indictment are "vague, indefinite, uncertain, ambiguous, equivocal, and contradictory." The document requests more names, locations, and other details of the "gambling establishments" that Carrollo is accused of collecting, or authorizing other people to collect, "lug and protection money" from. The names of other people authorized to make collections are also requested, as well as a definition of "lug and protection money," and the amounts and other specifics of that money. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Docket Entries

Docket entries in Criminal Case No. 14639: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss. The document lists the timeline of events in the case, including the indictment filing on July 21, 1939, guilty pleas on counts 3 and 4 on October 19, 1939, and sentencing on October 29, 1939. Carrollo was committed to the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on November 14, 1939, and a notice of appeal was filed on September 9, 1943.

January 1, 1943
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14639: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with income tax evasion in the years 1935-1939. The indictment details his sources of income, including smoke and cigar shops, gaming and gambling operations, casinos, liquor distributors, and nightclubs and bars.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged in connection with his application for naturalization as a United States citizen. The indictment states that Carrollo had, under oath, sworn that during the years prior to filing for naturalization, he had "behaved as a personal of good moral character," and specifically, that he had denied receiving any profit from gambling or gaming. The indictment charges that he knowingly perjured himself in doing so. Carrollo was deported to Italy in 1954 after serving a prison sentence at Alcatraz.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, a Kansas City mob boss, was found guilty in the charge of perjury and sentenced to four years in the penitentiary.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14581: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to one year and one day in penitentiary, to run consecutively with his sentence in case No. 14578.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Sentencing

Sentencing in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was found guilty of perjury by jury trial. Judge Merrill E. Otis writes that the proof of Carrollo's guilt was "overwhelming," discusses the seriousness of perjury as "gravely threatening to the well-being of the state," and notes that the maximum punishment allowed is five years' imprisonment and a $2,000 fine. Otis also notes that Carrollo had a prior criminal record, and as an immigrant, "sought to repay the people of the United States for the welcome they had extended ... by violating and defying their laws." Carrollo received a sentence of four years in the penitentiary for case No. 14578. Otis further sentenced Carrollo, after he plead guilty in case No. 14581, to one year and one day in the penitentiary, to be served consecutively with the previous sentence. Otis also handled sentencing for case No. 14639, in which Carrollo plead guilty to two counts of tax evasion. Otis sentenced the defendant in this case to three years in the penitentiary and repayment of the income taxes, interest, and penalties due for the years 1938 and 1938, and notes the pentalty alone totals over $80,000.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 5928: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. The defendant is charged with the sale and possession of "one-half pint of whiskey" and "maintain[ing] a common nuisance" at 212 Independence Avenue.

January 1, 1923
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 4414: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta is charged with three counts of selling whiskey: one half pint to Henry Fulton, two ounces to Harry Hall, and another two ounces to Set Carson on July 5, 1921. He was also charged, in a fourth count, of a second offense of possession of "intoxicating liquor."

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was charged in three counts related to the possession and concealment of two .45 caliber pistols that had been stolen from the National Guard Armory in Kansas City, Kansas. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Statement

Statement made by Charles Gargotta in Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta made a statement to Prosecuting Attorney T. A. J. Mastin in which he indicated that he was arrested on the street after leaving a woman's apartment on Armour Boulevard. He claimed that he only heard shooting to the east of him, and was not only was he unarmed at the time of his arrest, but that he had never owned an automatic pistol. He also took issue with other details of the case. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Verdict

Verdict in the trial of Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. The defendant was found guilty in all three counts of illegal weapons charges. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles S. Gargotta and Charles Gargotta: Commitment

Commitment in the trial of Criminal Case No. 4163: United States vs. Charles S. Gargotta and Charles Gargotta, defendants. The document notes that Charles S. Gargotta was charged with "Violation of the Act of October 28, 1919," also known as the Volstead Act, and has been sentenced to a prison sentence of 30 days in the Jackson County Jail.

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Charles S. Gargotta and Charles Gargotta: Information

Information for the trial of Criminal Case No. 4163: United States vs. Charles S. Gargotta and Charles Gargotta, defendants. The document states that the current charge of possession of whiskey is Charles S. Gargotta's second offense, per Frank Cunningham, Federal Prohibition Agent.

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Charles V. Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles V. Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

U.S. vs. Charley Gargotta: Commitment

Commitment in the trial of Criminal Case No. 4182: United States vs. Charley Gargotta, defendant. The document notes that Charles Gargotta was charged with "Violation of the Act of October 28, 1919," also known as the Volstead Act, and has been sentenced to a prison sentence of 30 days in the Jackson County Jail, "to commence at the expiration of sentence imposed in [Case] No. 4163."

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Charley Gargotta: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 4414: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was found guilty of "the offense of Violation of the National Prohibition Act," and sentenced to serve six months in the Pettis County Jail in Sedalia, Missouri. The document also includes a certification of Gargotta's delivery to the Pettis County Sheriff on December 7, 1921, to begin serving his sentence.

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Charley Gargotta: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 4182: United States vs. Charley Gargotta, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. E. Dunigan, Federal Prohibition Agent, Charley Gargotta was in possession of a half pint of whiskey on December 29, 1920.

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Charley Gargotta: Verdict

Verdict in the trial for Criminal Case No. 4414: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was found guilty in the first count and fourth counts of selling and possession of "an intoxicating beverage," i.e. whiskey, and not guilty of the second and third counts, also of the sale of whiskey. The verdicts are signed off on by N. C. Ewing, Foreman of the Jury.

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Dominick Binaggia: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 7677: United States vs. Dominick Binaggia, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of John J. McGowan (Exhibit A), Federal Prohibition Agent, Binaggia possessed and sold one half pint of whiskey, and maintained a "common nuisance" at 1642 St. Louis Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri,where "intoxicating liquors ... were kept, sold, and bartered" in violation of the Prohibition Act.

January 1, 1923
U.S. vs. Eddie Moran: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. The document reports that Moran entered a plea of guilty to violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve two months at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. DiGiovanna was delivered to the jailer on December 15, 1932.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Elton Apt and Arthur L. Curran: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6471: United States vs. Elton Apt and Arthur L. Curran, defendants. The defendants were serving as Federal Prohibition Agents in Kansas City, Missouri, and are charged with conspiring to conduct raids on individuals suspected of violating the Prohibition Act and then extort those individuals for cash payments to avoid arrest and receive protection from future interference in their distillation, possession, or sale of alcohol. The indictment also alleges that, should the subjects of their investigations be arrested for Prohibition violations, the defendants "should withhold testimony concerning said matters or should give false testimony." The case was dismissed by order of District Judge Albert L. Reeves in November 1927.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, et al.: Commitments

Commitments in Criminal Case No. 6469: United States vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, Isaac E. Martin, Benno Grauenbaum, Harvey Storms, Manning Wilcox, defendants. Manning Wilcox, Harvey Storms, Arthur L. Curran, and Elton Apt were found guilty of violating Section 37 of the Penal Code and sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth and assessed fines of 2,000, plus costs, per person.

January 1, 1926
U.S. vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6469: United States vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, Isaac E. Martin, Benno Grauenbaum, Harvey Storms, Manning Wilcox, defendants. The defendants were all Federal Prohibition Agents in Kansas City, Missouri, and are all charged "in the unlawful manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors or in the unlawful possession thereof." They are also charged with dividing the city into "different raiding territories," then using their positions to extort money from the subjects of their investigations and raids.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6470: United States vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, Isaac E. Martin, Harvey Storms, Manning Wilcox, defendants. The defendants were serving as Federal Prohibition Agents in Kansas City, Missouri, and are all charged with conspiring to conduct raids on individuals suspected of violating the Prohibition Act and then extort those individuals for cash payments to avoid arrest and receive protection from future interference in their distillation, possession, or sale of alcohol. The indictment also alleges that, should the subjects of their investigations be arrested for Prohibition violations, the defendants "should withhold testimony, or give false testimony at [their] hearing, or trial." The indictment specifically addresses their extortion of Louis Farino, Harvey Leopold, J. E. Giambalvo, Joe Bruno, and T. L. Powers.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, et al.: Joseph Lusco Direct Examination Transcript

Transcript of examination of Joseph Lusco before the Grand Jury in Criminal Case No. 6469: United States vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, Isaac E. Martin, Benno Grauenbaum, Harvey Storms, Manning Wilcox, defendants. The transcript examination of Joseph Lusco regarding his experience with Agents Wilcox and Curran. Lusco had a pending Prohibition violation case, and had previously been convicted of other Prohibition violations. When Lusco was asked where he kept his liquor, he replied "That is for you to find out."

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, et al.: Order for the Dismissal of Cases

Order for the Dismissal of Criminal Case No. 6470: United States vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, Isaac E. Martin, Harvey Storms, Manning Wilcox, defendants. The document, signed by District Judge Albert L. Reeves, also orders dismissed eighteen additional cases involving the same defendants, all Federal Prohibition Agents. Eight more cases involving other defendants were also dismissed by this order.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, et al.: Praecipe for Witnesses before Grand Jury

Praecipe for witnesses before the Grand Jury in Criminal Case No. 6469: United States vs. Elton Apt, Arthur L. Curran, Ray Kirk, Isaac E. Martin, Benno Grauenbaum, Harvey Storms, Manning Wilcox, defendants. The document lists individuals to whom the court will issue a subpoena to appear in court on November 17, 1924, to testify in the case. The document lists names and addresses of witnesses, including individuals who were alleged victims of extortion by the defendants.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Flore Picralli: Comittment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 8555: United States vs. Flore Picralli, defendant. The document notes that Picralli was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. Picralli was delivered to the warden of the penitentiary on September 8, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Flore Picralli: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8555: United States vs. Flore Picralli, defendant. Picralli was charged with, in Count I, possessing unregistered distilling equipment, i.e. a 35-gallon whiskey still; in Count II, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, possessing and fermenting 100 gallons of mash "fit for distillation and for the production of alcoholic spirits" outside of a legal distillery; and in Count IV, operating a "distilling apparatus" inside a dwelling at 527 Tracy Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Flore Picralli: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8555: United States vs. Flore Picralli, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on January 16, 1928, and the attorneys representing each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley ordered a recognizance of $2500.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector: Affidavit of Personal Bias or Prejudice By and On Behalf of the Defendant Frank DeMayo

Affidavit in Criminal Case No. 7988: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. DeMayo states that the judge in his case, F. E. Kennamer, "has a personal bias or prejudice against him, and has a personal bias and prejudice in favor of ... the United States of America," and that additional information utside the bounds of the case has been communicated to the judge by "persons connected with the United States Government" and "has formed an adverse opinion as to [DeMayo's] innocence." The document also alleges that Kennamer has indicated that he believes "a bootlegger [is] the same as a murderer."

U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 7988: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The defendants are charged with illegally allowing the bottling of distilled spirits and stamping them with stamps "purporting to be engraved strip stamps issued by the United States Government" in an office at the Kansas City Life Building. The document specifically mentions a sale to Jason Kominakis in Omaha, Nebraska, of three hundred counterfeit stamps.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 7988: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The defendants are charged with illegally allowing the bottling of distilled spirits and stamping them with stamps "purporting to be engraved strip stamps issued by the United States Government" in an office at the Kansas City Life Building. The document specifically mentions a sale to Jason Kominakis in Omaha, Nebraska, of 24 pint bottles of whiskey bearing counterfeit stamps and purporting to contain "Old Grand Dad" whiskey bottled in Kentucky.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8046: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiracy to violate the National Prohibition Act by selling "intoxicating liquors fit for beverage purposes." The men were charged in three counts: Count I describes several sales of bourbon, Scotch, and other alcohol to James Kominakis, including the delivery of a purchase to Omaha, Nebraska, and the maintainence of an office for this business in the Kansas City Life building; Count II charges that the defendants bottled distilled spirits, stamped them with counterfeit strip stamps, and then sold those falsely-stamped bottles to Jason Kominakis; Count III makes additional charges regarding bottling and counterfeiting strip stamps and the sale of falsely-stamped bottles.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector: Indictment

Affidavit in Criminal Case No. 7991: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The defendants were charged with Prohibition Act violations including selling whiskey and alcohol "suitable for beverage purposes." The indictment describes the defendants selling 24 one pint bottles, and an additional 50 gallons, to Jason Kominakis, as well as an agreement to sell "one case of Bourbon whiskey, one case of Scotch whiskey, 25 gallons of alcohol and 25 sets of counterfeit strip revenue stampss for the sum of $520.00" to James Kominakis in Omaha, Nebraska.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Commitment

Commitment of Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo in the trial of Criminal Case No. 8046: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The document notes that DeMayo was found guilty of Prohibition Act violations, and sentenced to serve two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas. DeMayo was delivered to the warden of the penitentiary on May 3, 1929.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Defendant's Affidavit of Personal Bias or Prejudice

Affidavit in Criminal Case No. 7990: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. DeMayo states that the judge in his case, F. E. Kennamer, "has a personal bias or prejudice against him, and has a personal bias and prejudice in favor of ... the United States of America," and that additional information utside the bounds of the case has been communicated to the judge by "persons connected with the United States Government" and "has formed an adverse opinion as to [DeMayo's] innocence." The document also alleges that Kennamer has indicated that he believes "a bootlegger [is] the same as a murderer."

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 7990: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. The defendant is charged with selling twenty four strip stamps "purporting to be engraved strip stamps issued by the United States Government" to Jason Kominakis near the Westgate Hotel in Kansas City.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8460: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. DeMayo was charged with possession of a Liberty Bond worth $5000 that had been stolen from the mail, "with intent to convert the same to his own use and gain and to deprive the owner of the use thereof."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8460: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. DeMayo was charged with receiving and possessing a knowingly-stolen Liberty Bond worth $5000 "with intent to convert the same to his own use and gain and to deprive the owner of the use thereof."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8461: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on April 2, 1928, the witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that DeMayo was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $5000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank Balestrere: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 12392: United States vs. Frank Balestrere, defendant. The document reports that Giarameta entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to serve one year and one day in the United States Industrial Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio. Giarameta was delivered to the jailer on December 27, 1932.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Frank Balestrere: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 12392: United States vs. Frank Balestrere, defendant. Balestrere was charged in multiple counts: in Count I, possessing unregistered whiskey distilling equipment with a 60-gallon capacity; in Count II, operating a distillery "without having given a bond as required by law"; in Count III, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count IV, possessing and fermenting "a quantity of mash [1200 gallons] fit for distillation"; and in Count V, operating a distillery in a "dwelling house" at 508 Harrison Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Frank Balestrere: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 12392: United States vs. Frank Balestrere, defendant. The order, signed by Judge Merrill E. Otis, orders Balestrere's release from the Johnson County Jail on January 6, 1934. Otis cites Balestrere's lack of previous criminal record and letters from doctors attesting to Balestrere's poor health. The order states that upon his release, Balestrere will be subject to two years of probation.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Frank Balestrere: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 12392: United States vs. Frank Balestrere, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on September 30, 1933, witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner James S. Summers held that Balestrere was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $2,000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on October 2, 1933.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Frank DeLuca: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 8085: United States vs. Frank DeLuca, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of Walter E. Payne, Federal Prohibition Agent, DeLuca possessed "for beverage purposes," 71 pints and 17 gallons of whiskey, and one gallon of alcohol, in violation of the National Prohibition Act.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank DeLuca: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8085: United States vs. Frank DeLuca, defendant, summarizing DeLuca's arrest on June 2, 1927, the witnesses who appeared on his behalf, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that DeLuca was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $1000.00, and ordered to appear in the District Court on November 7, 1927.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Frank Deluna and Ben Danzo: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 8902: United States vs. Frank DeLuna and Ben Danzo, defendants. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. Harold Lane, Federal Prohibition Agent, Deluna and Danzo possessed and transported, "for beverage purposes," fifteen gallons of whiskey.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank Deluna and Ben Danzo: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8902: United States vs. Frank Deluna and Ben Danzo, defendants. The document summarizes facts of the case, including the defendants' arrest on April 27, 1928 and the attorneys representing each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley ordered a recognizance of $500.00, and ordered the men to appear in the District Court on November 5, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank Deluna: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 8902: United States vs. Frank DeLuna and Ben Danzo, defendants. The document states that Frank Deluna entered a plea of guilty to the charge that he unlawfully transported "intoxicating liquor" in a motor car, and orders that the Peerless Touring Car be forfeited to the goverment "for use in the enforcement of the National Prohibition Act."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo and Cy Summers: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 9177: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, and Cy Summers, defendants. The defendants are charged with the manufacture, transportation, and sale alcohol in violation of the National Prohibition Act. These and other crimes are detailed within. This case was part of a series of mistrials involving a hung jury and juror bribery that finally ended with the conviction of Frank DeMayo.

U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Abe Schneider, Jack Clarkson, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8647: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Abe Schneider, Jack Clarkson, Joe Maniscalao (alias Joe Mancello), and Joe Deblume, defendants. They are charged with conspiring to "engage in the business of unlawfully selling intoxicating liquors" in violation of the National Prohibition Act. The indictment goes on to list specific sales, including the individuals to whom they sold liquor and the dates and places those sales took place. The Kansas City Life building and an office at 1115 East 8th Street, Kansas City, are listed as the defendants' places of business.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Abe Schneider, Jack Clarkson, et al.: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 8647: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Abe Schneider, Jack Clarkson, Joe Maniscalao (alias Joe Mancello), and Joe Deblume, defendants. Judge Albert L. Reeves orders the case be dismissed.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Abe Schneider, Jack Clarkson, et al.: Plea in Bar

Plea in bar in Criminal Case No. 8647: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Abe Schneider, Jack Clarkson, Joe Maniscalao (alias Joe Mancello), and Joe Deblume, defendants. The document states that DeMayo and his codefendants were indicted in May 1928 in U.S. District Court, Northern District of Oklahoma, for conspiring with L. L. Kesley to bring "intoxicating liquor" into Tulsa, Oklahoma, by automobile, as well as bringing alcohol into the Indian Territory, which was prohibited by federal law. DeMayo faced trial in Oklahoma for these charges, was found guilty, and was sentenced to two years in the federal penitentiary in Atlanta, Georgia and to pay a fine of $10,000. DeMayo's attorney that the current charges the defendants currently face are effectively double jeopardy and should be dropped.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Joe Tutaro, Frank Fischman, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8991: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Joe Tutaro, Frank Fischman, Veto DeRoun, Meyer Esthman, Joseph Aroitto, and Sam Greenburg, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiracy to violate the National Prohibition Act by bottling and selling distilled spirits and bonding them with counterfeit stamps. Further, they are charged with hiring Henry Prudhomme to murder Gust West and James Komanakis, both Federal Prohibition Agents, who had testified against Frank DeMayo and Joe Tutaro in the past and were expected to do so in other pending cases against them. The indictment goes on to list specific instances of alcohol and counterfeint stamp sales involving the defendents, including the names of those to whom alcohol were sold and the time and place of the sales, and additional details about the murder plot.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Joe Tutaro, Frank Fischman, et al.: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 8991: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Joe Tutaro, Frank Fischman, Veto DeRoun, Meyer Esthman, Joseph Aroitto, and Sam Greenburg, defendants. Judge Albert L. Reeves orders the case be dismissed.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Sam Tripi, and John F. Lyhne: Exhibits

Four exhibits from Criminal Case No. 9176: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Sam Tripi, and John F. Lyhne, defendants. Exhibit #7 is the businees card of Frank DeMayo, representing Muskogee Natural Gas Company. Exhibit #5 is a letter from L. L. Kelsey to Frank DeMayo on April 25, 1928 discussing a "shipment". The following telegram from "Jack" to Frank DeMayo telling Frank to "give him good stuff." The final document provides additional information about these exhibits.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank DeMayo, Sam Tripi, and John F. Lyhne: Indictment

The indictment for Criminal Case No. 9176: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Sam Tripi, and John F. Lyhne, defendants. The defendants are charged with the manufacture, transportation, and sale alcohol in violation of the National Prohibition Act. These and other crimes are detailed within.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Glenn White: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. The document reports that Glenn White entered a plea of guilty of violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one day at the Jackson County Jail.

U.S. vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 11781: United States vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, Fred Sorisso and George Evans, defendants. The defendants were charged in multiple counts: in Count I, sale of eight ounces of whiskey; in Count II, another sale of eight ounces of whiskey; in Count III, with operating "the business of a retail dealer in intoxicating liquor" without having paid the appropriate tax; and in Count IV, with maintaining a common nuisance at 503 Walnut Street in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, et al.: Warrant to Apprehend

Warrant to apprehend in Criminal Case No. 11781: United States vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, Fred Sorisso and George Evans, defendants. Commissioner James S. Summers approved the warrant to arrest the defendants per an account by Prohibition Investigator Leo C. Krayer that he and another investigator were able to purchase "four whiskey highballs and one pint of colored spirits," as well as other illegal purchases.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Gus Gargotta: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 11781: United States vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, Fred Sorisso and George Evans, defendants. The document reports that Gus Gargotta was charged in four counts with violating the Prohibition Act. He entered a plea of guilty to the first count and was sentenced to serve two months at the Buchanan County Jail in St. Joseph, Missouri. Gargotta was delivered to the jailer on December 23, 1932.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Hallitt Perkins: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 11781: United States vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, Fred Sorisso and George Evans, defendants. The document reports that Hallitt Perkins was charged in four counts with violating the Prohibition Act. He entered a plea of guilty to the fourth count and was sentenced to serve one day at the Jackson County Jail. Perkins was delivered to the jailer on October 29, 1932.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Jake Binaggia, Frank Fondana and Tony Dibanata: Commissioner's Report of Trial

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 5676: United States vs. Jake Binaggia, Frank Fondana and Tony Dibanata, defendant. The document summarizing Tony DiBanata's hearing before George D. Beardsley, United States Commissioner. DiBanata was held as "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $1000, and ordered to appear in U.S. District Court on April 23, 1923.

January 1, 1923
U.S. vs. Jake Binaggia, Frank Fondana and Tony Dibanata: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 5676: United States vs. Jake Binaggia, Frank Fondana and Tony Dibanata, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of Arthur L. Curran, Federal Prohibition Agent, Binaggia, Fondana, and Dibanata were in possession of five gallons of whiskey on December 18, 1922.

January 1, 1923
U.S. vs. Jake Binaggia, Frank Fondana and Tony Dibanata: Search Warrant for 100 Delaware

Search warrant issued for "the premises of John Doe (true name unknown) at 100 Delaware Street, alleging that "intoxicating liquor has been and is now being illegally kept, bartered and sold, in the pool hall and soft drink parlor" at that address. The search warrant was executed on February 28, 1923, and was relevant to Criminal Case No. 5676: United States vs. Jake Binaggia, Frank Fondana and Tony Dibanata, defendant.

January 1, 1923
U.S. vs. James Akers, John Thomas, Earl D. Heisler and Roy C. Brown: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 2214: United States vs. James Akers, alias Arthur Louis, JohnThomas, Earl D. Heisler, and Roy C. Brown, defendants. The defendants are charged with possessing "a certain distilling apparatus" for the manufacture of whiskey that was unregistered with the Internal Revue Service as required by law. Their distilling operation was located at 1122 North River Boulevard in Independence, Missouri.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. James Gargotta and Anthony Trombino: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14218: United States vs. James Gargotta and Anthony Trombino, defendants. The defendants were charged with feloniously removing a total of 22 gallons of alcohol, on which the tax had not been paid, from a distillery "to a place other than a distillery warehouse" at 548 Troost.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. James Gargotta and Anthony Trombino: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14218: United States vs. James Gargotta and Anthony Trombino, defendants. Gargotta entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to eight months in jail, to run concurrently with his sentence in case No. 14215. Trombino entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to four months in jail, to run concurrently with his sentence in case No. 14215.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. James Scola, Richard Rizzuto, Jack Rizzuto, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14215: United States vs. James Scola, Richard Rizzuto, Jack Rizzuto, Michael Gagliano, Nick Palmantino, James Gargotta, John Buffa, Anthony Trombino, Joseph Bonjoe, Gus A. Roudebush, Albert Johnson, Thomas P. Dodge, Catherine Montalte, William Edmond, Robert Smith, Jesse Brown, Ray Alexander, Ondee Davis, John A. Weathers, Edward Wilkes, Littleton Hendricks, Perry Renfro, Triece M. Harris, Percy Lee, Linwood Allen, Steve Plas, and John Monteleone, defendants. The defendants were charged with transporting and selling alcohol without paying the required federal taxes. The indictment lists numerous locations which the defendants used for storage and sale of liquor throughout the city, and how the defendants obtained, transported, stored, and sold the alcohol.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. James Scola, Richard Rizzuto, Jack Rizzuto, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14215: United States vs. James Scola, Richard Rizzuto, Jack Rizzuto, Michael Gagliano, Nick Palmantino, James Gargotta, John Buffa, Anthony Trombino, Joseph Bonjoe, Gus A. Roudebush, Albert Johnson, Thomas P. Dodge, Catherine Montalte, William Edmond, Robert Smith, Jesse Brown, Ray Alexander, Ondee Davis, John A. Weathers, Edward Wilkes, Littleton Hendricks, Perry Renfro, Triece M. Harris, Percy Lee, Linwood Allen, Steve Plas, and John Monteleone, defendants. Scola, the Rizzutos, Gagliano, Palmantino, and Gargotta entered pleas of guilty and were sentenced to jail for eight months. Buffa, Trombino, Bonjoe, Plas and Monteleone entered pleas of guilty and were sentenced to four months in jail. Roudebush entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to eight days in jail. Johnson entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to thirty days in jail. Dodge entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to thirteen days in jail. Montalte entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to one year and one day in a reformatory. Smith and Harris entered pleas of guilty and were committed to custody of the U.S. Marshal for one day. Alexander, Davis, Renfro, and Allen entered pleas of guilty and were sentenced to one year and one day in the penitentiary, suspended for probation for the same time period. Weathers, Wilkes, Hendricks, and Lee entered pleas of guilty and were sentenced to one day in jail.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Jim "Manny" Akers: Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus ad prosequendum

Writ of habeas corpus ad prosequendum in Criminal Case No. 2214: United States vs. James Akers, alias Arthur Louis, JohnThomas, Earl D. Heisler, and Roy C. Brown, defendants, requesting that Jim "Manny" Akers be delivered from the Leavenworth Penitentiary to appear in court to receive sentencing.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Jimmie DeSimone: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 8527: United States vs. Jimmie DeSimone, alias Jimmie Ross, defendant. The document notes that DeSimone was charged with violating the Harrison Narcotic Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. DeSimone was delivered to the warden of the penitentiary on November 1, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Jimmie DeSimone: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8527: United States vs. Jimmie DeSimone, alias Jimmie Ross, defendant. DeSimone was charged with selling Dorothy Kimball one ounce of morphine, and was also charged with the purchase of one ounce of morphine, in violation of the Harrison Narcotic Act.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Jimmie DeSimone: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8527: United States vs. Jimmie DeSimone, alias Jimmie Ross, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on April 21, 1928, and his plea of guilty. Commissioner George D. Beardsley ordered a recognizance of $2500.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Joe Berbiglia: Application to Squash Search Warrant and Suppress Testimony

Application to squash search warrant and suppress testimony in the trial of Criminal Case No. 7742: United States vs. Joe Berbiglia, defendant. The document argues that the search warrant, executed on January 7, 1927, was invalid due to inadequate statement of probable cause, that laws were not being violated at the "not sufficiently described" private dwelling, and the warrant was not returned to the commissioner within the required time period, and thus "the affidavits, search warrant, return and inventory have not been filed iwth the clerk of this court as provided by law."

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Joe Berbiglia: Commitment

Commitment in the trial of Criminal Case No. 7742: United States vs. Joe Berbiglia, defendant. The document notes that Joe Berbiglia was found guilty of the four counts of Prohibition Act violation with which he was charged, and received a prison sentence of 60 days in the Clay County Jail and a fine of $100. Berbiglia was delivered to the jailer of the Clay County Jail on November 9, 1927.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Joe Berbiglia: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 7742: United States vs. Joe Berbiglia, defendants. Berbiglia is charged in four counts with violating the National Prohibition Act: in Count I, with possessing unregistered distillery equipment; in Count II, with operating a distillery; in Count III, with making, possessing, and fermenting approximately twelve hundred gallons of mash, "a quantity ... fit for distillation"; and in Count IV, using a still "for the distillation and manufacturer of alcoholic spirits in a dwelling house" at 1734 East Missouri Avenue.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Joe Bertini, Joe DiGiovanni and Tony Tumminello: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8262: United States vs. Joe Bertini, Joe DiGiovanni and Tony Tumminello, defendants. The defendants were charged with possession of unregistered distilling equipment. In a second count, the defendants were charged with ilegally operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of the tax on the spirits distilled by him." In third fourth counts, the men were charged with "possess[ing] and ferment[ing] a quantity of mash fit for distillation, to wit, 4000 gallons," and doing so illegally in a "dwelling house" at 2547 Agnes Avenue.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Joe Di Giovanni and Paul Di Giovanni: Commissioner's Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 4071: United States vs. Paul Di Giovanni and Joseph Di Giovanni, defendants, summarizing the facts of the trial, including the defendants' pleas of guilty.

January 1, 1920
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanna: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9384: United States vs. Sam Pallino and Joseph DiGiovanna, defendants. The document reports that Joe DiGiovanna was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to a fine of $400.00 and to remain in Lafayette County Jail until the fine is paid or until his sentence from Case No. 9207 is served.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanna: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9761: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanna, defendants. The document reports that DiGiovanna was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve sixty days at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. DiGiovanna was delivered to the jailer on November 8, 1930.

January 1, 1930
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanna: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 9761: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanna, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. Harold Lane, Federal Prohibition Agent, DiGiovanna was in possession onf 22 gallons of whiskey on September 11, 1929.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanna: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 9761: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanna, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on September 12, 1929 and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner James S. Summers held that Carollo was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $5000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on November 5, 1929.

January 1, 1930
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanni: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8389: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanni, defendant. The defendant was charged with, in Count I, possession of unregistered distilling equipment "; in Count II, operating a distillery, at 516 East 5th Street in Kansas City, "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; and in Count III, possessing and fermenting "a quantity of mash fit for distillation ... to wit, 2000 gallons," outside of a registered distillery."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanni: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8550: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanni, defendant. DiGiovanni was charged with, in Count I, possessing unregistered distilling equipment, i.e. a 250-gallon whiskey still; in Count II, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, possessing and fermenting 2000 gallons of mash "for the productive of alcoholic spirits" at a dwelling at 518 East 5th Street in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanni: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 9129: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanna, defendant. DiGiovanni was charged with National Prohibition Act violations in multiple counts: in Count I, with possession of distilling equipment; in Count II, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, operating an unbonded distillery; in Count IV, possessing and fermenting 300 gallons of mash "for the production of alcoholic spirits" at private home located at 1847 East 7th Street in Kansas City, Missouri; and in Count V, operating distilling equipment in the previously-mentioned private home.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanni: Order of Probation

Order of probation in Criminal Case #9129, United States vs. Joe DiGiovanna, defendant. The order notes that the defendant entered a plea of guilty to the charge of possessing an unregistered whiskey still and sentences him to two years of probation with a $1,000 bond. Dr. Max Goldman is named as his probation officer.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanni: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8389: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanni, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendants' arrest on January 7, 1928, the witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner James S. Summers held that Joe DiGiovanni was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $2500.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on January 7, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Joe DiGiovanni: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8550: United States vs. Joe DiGiovanni, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on November 26, 1927.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Joe Giarameta: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 12391: United States vs. Joe Giarameta, defendant. The document reports that Giarameta entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to serve one year and one day in the United States Industrial Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio. Giarameta was delivered to the jailer on December 27, 1933.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Joe Giarameta: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 12391: United States vs. Joe Giarameta, defendant. Giarameta was charged in multiple counts: in Count I, possessing unregistered whiskey distilling equipment with a 100-gallon capacity; in Count II, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, operating a distillery "without having given a bond as required by law"; in Count IV, possessing and fermenting "a quantity of mash [800 gallons] fit for distillation"; and in Count V, operating a distillery in a "dwelling house" at 547 Gillis Street, Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Application for Surety and Recognizance for Appearance

Application for Surety and Recognizance for Appearance Before U.S. Court for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In these two documents, Morris E. Whitney acts as surety for Frank Mulloy's recognizance for appearance in court.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. The defendants are charged with the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol in violation of the National Prohibition Act. The defendants were all suspected of being affiliated with the Kansas City Mafia.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Motion for Bill of Particulars

Motion for Bill of Particulars for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, defendant Rosemary Lyons requests more information as to her alleged involvement in the prolonged conspiracy set forth in the indictment. She requests this information so that she may more adequately prepare her defense.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Order for Destruction of Contraband Property

Order for destruction of contrabad property in Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis orders confiscated liquor to be destroyed.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Order for Transfer of Alcohol

Order in Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, Judge Albert L. Reeves orders fifty gallons of grain alcohol confiscated from Guy Brock to be transferred to the Children's Mercy Hospital at Kansas City, Missouri for medicinal purposes.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Plea of Guilty by Defendant D. L. Pickett

Plea of Guilty by Defendant D. L. Pickett for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, defendant D. L. Pickett pleas guilty of the charges set forth in the indictment. Pickett is then ordered to pay a fine of $500.00.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Tutaro: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8991: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Joe Tutaro, Frank Fischman, Veto DeRoun, Meyer Esthman, Joseph Aroitto, and Sam Greenburg, defendants. The document summarizes facts of the Joe Tutaro's (alias Joe DeBlume) case, including his arrest on November 8, 1928 and the attorneys representing each side. Commissioner James S. Summers ordered a recognizance of $5000.00, and ordered Tutaro to appear in the District Court on November 9, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Bill of Exceptions in Condensed and Narrative Form

Bill of Exceptions in Condensed and Narrative Form for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document provides an account of all exceptions made during the trial testimony.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Docket

Docket for Criminal Case No. 12287: United States vs. John Lazia. This document provides an official summary of proceedings for this case, including a record of his sentencing. After being connected to the Union Station massacre in 1933, Lazia lost political protection from the Pendergast machine and was indicted for bootlegging, illegal gambling and tax evasion.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document charges Lazia with tax evasion. He was suspected to be affiliated with the Kansas City Mafia and the Pendergast Machine.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Memorandum in Support of Motion for Bill of Particulars

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. In this document, Frank P. Walsh, attorney for Lazia, requests greater detail in the illegal activity Lazia is charged with. Walsh requests this information in order to furnish a strong defense for his client.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Order for Capias

Order for Capias for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document orders a writ for arrest of defendant John Lazia and that his "bond be fixed in the sum of $1,500.00." Lazia was suspected of being affiliated with the Kansas City Mafia and the Pendergast Machine.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Order for Subpoena Duces Tecum

Order for subpoena duces tecum for Raymond A. Edlund in Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document orders a writ to order Edlund to appear before court and bring a number of selected documents. These requested documents include records of John Lazia's financial transactions at the Merchants Bank of Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Statement Made by the Court When Imposing Sentences

Statement Made by the Court When Imposing Sentences for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. In this document, the court affirms its belief that the jury was unbiased, despite the large amount of publicity the case received. The court also explains the decisions made when imposing punishment for Lazia's guilty verdict.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Verdict

Verdict for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. In this document, Lazia is found guilty as charged in the indictment.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John Thomas: Judgement and Sentence

Judgement and sentencing document in Criminal Case No. 2214: United States vs. James Akers, alias Arthur Louis, JohnThomas, Earl D. Heisler, and Roy C. Brown, defendants, ordering John Thomas be imprisoned for two years at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth and $100 fine and $500 penalty on the 1st count of the indictment, as well as two years for the second and third counts, to be served concurrently with the sentence for the first.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Johnnie O'Hara: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 13395: United States vs. Johnnie O'Hara, defendant. The document reports that O'Hara was sentenced to serve three months in the Johnson County Jail at Warrensburg, Missouri. O'Hara was delivered to the jailer on May 27, 1936.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Johnnie O'Hara: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13395: United States vs. Johnnie O'Hara, defendant. O'Hara was charged with in three counts with, in Count I, illegally removing "distilled spirits on which the tax had not been paid" from a distillery; in Count II, concealing untaxed distilled spirits, specifically three gallons of moonshine whiskey, in an alley between Harrison and Campbell Streets; and in Count III, transporting untaxed distilled spirits while not being a "legally established common carrier" in a 1929 Chevrolet Coach.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Joseph Di Giovanni and Paul Di Giovanni: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 4071: United States vs. Paul Di Giovanni and Joseph Di Giovanni, defendants. The defendants are charged with manufacturing four thousand gallons of wine, and, in a second count, possession of that wine and an additional four gallons of alcohol, in violation of the National Prohibition Act.

January 1, 1920
U.S. vs. Joseph DiGiovanna: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9207: United States vs. Sam Pallino and Joseph DiGiovanna, defendants. The document reports that Joe DiGiovanna was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve four months at the Lafayette County Jail in Lexington, Missouri.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Joseph Lusco: Information and Affidavit

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 4639: United States vs. Charley Gargotta, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. E. Dunigan, Federal Prohibition Agent, Joseph Lusco was in possession of "a certain quantity of intoxicating liquor," i.e. one half pint of whiskey, on July 30, 1921, in violation of the National Prohibition Act. Dunigan also supported in his deposition Lusco's additional charges: a second count of selling a half pint of whiskey to Clyde Rayburn, and in a third count, a half pint of whiskey to E. L. Kellerstrass.

January 1, 1921
U.S. vs. Joseph Piscitta, Russell Piscitta, James Piscitta, et al.: Commitments

Commitments in Criminal Case No. 11784: United States vs. Joseph Piscitta, Russell Piscitta, James Piscitta, George Tippet, Hubert Brown, Udell Harris, Eugene Petko, Emery Petko, Wesley Cole and Theodore Wilson, defendants. James Piscitta was sentenced to one year and one day at the U.S. Industrial Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio. Udell Harris entered a plea of guilty to the second count and was sentenced to one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. Hubert Brown entered a plea of guilty to the second count and was sentenced to one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. George Tippett entered a plea of guilty to the second count and was sentenced to one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. Wesley Cole entered a plea of guilty to the second count and was sentenced to one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. Russell Piscitta entered a plea of guilty to the first count and was sentenced to three months at the Carroll County Jail in Carrollton, Missouri. James Piscitta entered a plea of guilty to the first count and was sentenced to three months at the Carroll County Jail in Carrollton, Missouri.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Joseph Piscitta, Russell Piscitta, James Piscitta, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 11784: United States vs. Joseph Piscitta, Russell Piscitta, James Piscitta, George Tippet, Hubert Brown, Udell Harris, Eugene Petko, Emery Petko, Wesley Cole and Theodore Wilson, defendants. The defendants were charged in multiple counts: in Count I, carrying on the business of liquor details without having paid the required tax, and maintaining a common nuisance

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Josie Balestrere and Buster Balestrere: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13387: United States vs. Josie Balestrere and Buster Balestrere, defendants. The defendants were charged in two counts: in Count I, with possession of a 50-gallon capacity whiskey still, and in Count II, with possessing and fermenting 300 gallons of mash for the manufacture outside of a licensed distillery and in a private home at 508 Harrison Street in Kansas City.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Josie Balestrere and Buster Balestrere: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 13387: United States vs. Josie Balestrere and Buster Balestrere, defendants. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendants' arrest on February 27, 1936, witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that the Balestreres were "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $1,500.00, and ordered them to appear in the District Court on March 2, 1936.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Max Jaffey, Frank DeMayo, and A. L. Sorenson: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6490: United States vs. Max Jaffey, Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, and A. L. Sorenson, defendants. DeMayo is charged with the "unlawful sale of intoxicating liquors" in violation of the National Prohibition Act, and A. L. Sorenson is charged with the purchase of alcohol, from DeMayo, in violation of the Act. Together, they, with Jaffey, are charged with conspiracy to extort money from Sorenson for protection from arrest and prosecution due to that sale. Sorenson is also charged with selling alcohol.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Mike Gargotta: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 11675: United States vs. Mike Gargotta, defendant. The document reports that Gargotta was charged in five counts with violating the Prohibition Act. He entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to serve three months at the Johnson County Jail in Warrensburg, Missouri. Gargotta was delivered to the jailer on November 14, 1932.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Mike Gargotta: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 11675: United States vs. Mike Gargotta, defendant. The document describes the multiple counts the defendant is charged with: in Count I, selling one pint of gin on August 9, 1932; in Count II, selling one pint of gin on August 11, 1932; in Count III, selling two pints of beer on August 12, 1932; in Count IV, possessing "80 gallons of beer and 65 pints of beer, 1/2 gallon of whiskey and 3 pints of whiskey and one gallon of gin"; and in Count V, maintaining a common nuice in the basement of the Broadview Hotel, 1424 Admiral Boulevard, Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Mike Gargotta: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 11675: United States vs. Mike Gargotta, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on September 7, 1933 and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that Gargotta was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $1,000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on December 3, 1933.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Nick Digeralamo: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 13391: United States vs. Nick Digeralamo, defendant. The document reports that Digeralamo was sentenced to serve three months in the Johnson County Jail at Warrensburg, Missouri. Digeralamo was delivered to the jailer on May 27, 1936.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binagio, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiracy to "barter, sell, transport and manufacture certain intoxicating liquors, to-wit: whiskey, alcohol, gin, ale and beer" and with maintaining a common nuisance at the White House Tavern, or Kit Kat Nite Club, near 82nd and Troost.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binagio, et al.: Order

Order in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. Judge Albert L. Reeves orders the case be dismissed.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binagio, et al.: Warrant to Apprehend

Warrant to apprehend in Criminal Case No. 11769: United States vs. Pat Noonan, Joe School, Charles Binaggio, Milan Redis, Glen White, Eddie Moran, Link Moran, Silas Counts, and Frank Hart, defendants. Commissioner James S. Summers approved the warrant to arrest the defendants per an account by Special Agent Martin J. Lahart that he and another investigator were able to purchase six whiskey highballs, and witnessed other customers purchasing cocktails and beer.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Paul Carollo: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 8549: United States vs. Paul Carollo, defendant. The document notes that DeSimone was charged with violating the Harrison Narcotic Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. DeSimone was delivered to the warden of the penitentiary on November 1, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Paul Carollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8549: United States vs. Paul Carollo, defendant. Carollo was charged with, in Count I, possessing unregistered distilling equipment, i.e. a 100-gallon whiskey still; in Count II, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, possessing and fermenting 100 gallons of mash "fit for distillation and for the production of alcoholic spirits" outside of a legal distillery; and in Count IV, operating a "distilling apparatus" inside a dwelling at 3233 Smart Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Paul Carollo: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8549: United States vs. Paul Carollo, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on January 6, 1928, the witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that Carollo was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $2000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Paul Di Giovanni: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 3956: United States vs. Paul Di Giovanni, defendant. The defendant is charged with selling, "for beverage purposes," a quart of wine, and being in possession of two quarts of wine, in violation of the National Prohibition Act.

January 1, 1920
U.S. vs. Pete Cardina, Mike Titino, Thomas Tococo and Charles Gargotta: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 5839: United States vs. Pete Cardina, Mike Titino, Thomas Tococo and Charles Gargotta, defendants. The document states that, per the affidavit of Arthur L. Curran, Federal Prohibition Agent, the defendants were found in possession of "a certain quantity of intoxicating liquor," i.e. one and one-fourth pints of whiskey. The affidavit also notes that Gargotta has a prior conviction of possession in violation of the National Prohibition Act. The defendants were also charged, in a second count, with maintaining a common nuisance at 212 Independence Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1923
U.S. vs. Peter Digiovanni: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 7127: United States vs. Peter Digiovanni, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of M. L. Hogg, Federal Prohibition Agent, sold one quarter of wine, possessed twenty-five gallons of wine, and "did maintain a common nuisance" at 1030 East 4th Street, Kansas City, Missouri, where he "kept, possessed, stored, and sold" liquor in violation of the National Prohibition Act.

January 1, 1926
U.S. vs. Peter Digiovanni: Search Warrant for 1030 East 5th Street

Search warrant issued for the building at 1030 East 5th Street in Kansas City, Missouri, described as "a two story brick building ... and occupied as a grocery store." The document alleges that "intoxicating liquor now is being kept for sale and barter in violation of the National Prohibition Act." The search warrant was executed by Agent Thurston C. Hulse on April 4, 1925, and was relevant to Criminal Case No. 7127: U.S. vs. Peter Digiovanni.

January 1, 1925
U.S. vs. Phillip Casciapoia: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13411: United States vs. Phillip Casciapoia, alias Tony Russo, defendant. Casciapoia was charged with in five counts with, in Count I, possessing an unregistered 250-gallon whiskey still; in Count II, with operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count III, with operating a distillery "without having given bond as required by law"; in Count IV, possessing and fermenting 1200 gallons of mash in a private private house at 569 Troost, outside of a distillery; and in Count V, possessing distilled spirits in containers without revenue stamps.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Phillip Casciapoia: Pre-Sentence Investigation

Pre-sentence investigation in Criminal Case No. 13411: United States vs. Phillip Casciapoia, alias Tony Russo, defendant. The investigation summarizes the charges against Casciapoia, additional facts in the case, and his personal history including work and family information. It also includes information from interviews with Casciapoia's tenants, vendors, and others who could attest to his character and habits. His criminal record and that of his family are also listed.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Ray Kirk and Benno Grauenbaum: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 6474: United States vs. Ray Kirk and Benno Grauenbaum, defendants. The defendants were serving as Federal Prohibition Agents in Kansas City, Missouri, and are charged with conspiring to conduct raids on individuals suspected of violating the Prohibition Act and then extort those individuals for cash payments to avoid arrest and receive protection from future interference in their distillation, possession, or sale of alcohol. The case was dismissed by order of District Judge Albert L. Reeves in November 1927.

January 1, 1924
U.S. vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, Herbert Allen Farmer, et al.: Application for Order for Subpoena Duces Tecum

Application for Order for Subpoena Duces Tecum for Criminal Case No. 12698: United States vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, alias Dick Galadis, alias Pritchard Sheridan; Herbert Allen Farmer, alias Herbert Black, alias H. A. Patton, alias W. H. Williams; Esther Farmer; Frances Nash, alias Frances Miller, alias Frances Harrison; Frank B. Mulloy, alias Frits Mulloy; Louis Stacci, alias Doc Stacey; Elisabeth Galatas, alias Betty McFadden, alias Mrs. Glenn Morris, and Vivian Mathis, alias Vivian Page, alias Clara Hays, Defendants. This document asks the court to order John H. Fultz and William H. Daugherty to appear in court with weapons used in a shootout by Adam Richetti and Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd. These witnesses and evidence are to be used against the defendants of the case. This document provides details on the shootout leading to the arrest of Richetti and Floyd.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, Herbert Allen Farmer, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12698: United States vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, alias Dick Galadis, alias Pritchard Sheridan; Herbert Allen Farmer, alias Herbert Black, alias H. A. Patton, alias W. H. Williams; Esther Farmer; Frances Nash, alias Frances Miller, alias Frances Harrison; Frank B. Mulloy, alias Frits Mulloy; Louis Stacci, alias Doc Stacey; Elisabeth Galatas, alias Betty McFadden, alias Mrs. Glenn Morris, and Vivian Mathis, alias Vivian Page, alias Clara Hays, Defendants. The defendants are charged in a conspiracy of aiding Vernon C. Miller and others attempting to free Frank Nash from police custody during the Union Station Massacre.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, Herbert Allen Farmer, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitments for Criminal Case No. 12698: United States vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, alias Dick Galadis, alias Pritchard Sheridan; Herbert Allen Farmer, alias Herbert Black, alias H. A. Patton, alias W. H. Williams; Esther Farmer; Frances Nash, alias Frances Miller, alias Frances Harrison; Frank B. Mulloy, alias Frits Mulloy; Louis Stacci, alias Doc Stacey; Elisabeth Galatas, alias Betty McFadden, alias Mrs. Glenn Morris, and Vivian Mathis, alias Vivian Page, alias Clara Hays, Defendants. Galatas, Farmer, Mulloy, and Stacci are all charged with two years in Leavenworth Penitentiary and a fine of $10,000.

January 1, 1935
U.S. vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, Herbert Allen Farmer, et al.: Motion and Petition to Suppress Evidence Illegally Obtained

Three motions and petitions to suppress evidence illegally obtained and intended to be used upon the trial of Criminal Case No. 12698: United States vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, alias Dick Galadis, alias Pritchard Sheridan; Herbert Allen Farmer, alias Herbert Black, alias H. A. Patton, alias W. H. Williams; Esther Farmer; Frances Nash, alias Frances Miller, alias Frances Harrison; Frank B. Mulloy, alias Frits Mulloy; Louis Stacci, alias Doc Stacey; Elisabeth Galatas, alias Betty McFadden, alias Mrs. Glenn Morris, and Vivian Mathis, alias Vivian Page, alias Clara Hays, Defendants. These petitions document the unprofessional circumstances in which the defendants were arrested, interrogated, and detained.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, Herbert Allen Farmer, et al.: Order for Subpoena Duces Tecum

Order for Subpoena Duces Tecum for Criminal Case No. 12698: United States vs. Richard Tallman Galatas, alias Dick Galadis, alias Pritchard Sheridan; Herbert Allen Farmer, alias Herbert Black, alias H. A. Patton, alias W. H. Williams; Esther Farmer; Frances Nash, alias Frances Miller, alias Frances Harrison; Frank B. Mulloy, alias Frits Mulloy; Louis Stacci, alias Doc Stacey; Elisabeth Galatas, alias Betty McFadden, alias Mrs. Glenn Morris, and Vivian Mathis, alias Vivian Page, alias Clara Hays, Defendants. This document orders John H. Fultz and William H. Daugherty to appear in court with weapons used in a shootout by Adam Richetti and Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd. These witnesses and evidence are to be used against the defendants of the case.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Robert Carnahan: Commitment

Commitment of Robert Carnahan in the trial of Criminal Case No. 8046: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, Robert Carnahan and B. E. Rector, defendants. The document notes that Carnahan was found guilty of conspiracy to violate the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas. Carnahan was delivered to the warden of the penitentiary on April 15, 1930.

January 1, 1930
U.S. vs. Rose Costanza: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8388: United States vs. Rose Costanza, defendant. The defendant was charged with, in Count I, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count II, making, possession, and fermenting "a quantity of mash fit for distillation... to wit, 120 gallons" outside of an authorized distillery; in Count III, manufacturing "for beverage purposes" six gallons of whiskey; and in Count IV, possessing six gallons of whiskey "for beverage purposes."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Rose Costanza: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8388: United States vs. Rose Costanza and Joseph Costanza, defendants. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendants' arrest on November 26, 1927, Joe Costanza's discharge from the case, the witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that Rose Costanza was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $2000.00, and ordered her to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Rose Costanza: Verdict

Verdict in the trial of Criminal Case No. 8838: United States vs. Rose Costanza, defendant. Costanza was found not guilty in the first, second, and third counts, related to operating a distillery, and guilty of the fourth count, related to the possession of alcohol. The verdicts are signed off on by the foreman of the jury.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Sam Pallino and Joseph DiGiovanna: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 9207: United States vs. Sam Pallino and Joseph DiGiovanna, defendants. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. Harold Lane, Federal Prohibition Agent, Pallino and DiGiovanna possessed and sold, "for beverage purposes," one quart of whiskey in three counts. The document also reports that the defendants possessed "for beverage purposes" 192 pints and 80 quarters of whiskey.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Sam Pallino and Joseph DiGiovanna: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 9207: United States vs. Sam Pallino and Joseph DiGiovanna, defendants. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendants' arrest on January 18, 1929 and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner James S. Summers held that Pallino and DiGiovanna were "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $1000.00, and ordered them to appear in the District Court on February 18, 1929.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Sam Pallino, Frank Mazzuca, and Joe DiGiovanna: Information

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 9384: United States vs. Sam Pallino, Frank Mazzuca, and Joe DiGiovanna, defendants. The document states that, per the affidavit of W. Harold Lane, Federal Prohibition Agent, the defendants, in multiple counts, sold quantities of apricot brandy and were in possession of "25 pints, 12 quarts, 34 half pints, 83 quarts, 47 pints and 96 half pints of whiskey." The defendants are also accused of maintaining a "common nuisance" at 516 Harrison Street in Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Sam Pallino, Frank Mazzuca, and Joe DiGiovanna: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 9384: United States vs. Sam Pallino, Frank Mazzuca, and Joe DiGiovanna, defendants. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendants' arrest on March 2, 1929, the witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that the defendants were "probably guilty," ordered recognizance of $1000.00 and $500.00, and ordered them to appear in the District Court on April 22, 1929.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Solly Weissman, Bob Rippan, Frank Malloy, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 9018: United States vs. Solly Weissman, Bob Rippen, Frank (Fred) Malloy, Joseph L. Tingle, Emma Amsler (alias Helen E. Johnson), and Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiracy to "sell, barter, transport, deliver, furnish and possess intoxicating liquor in violation of the National Prohibition Act." The indictment specifies that the defendants transported 94 drums of alcohol from Buffalo, New York and 106 drums from Long Dock, New Jersey to sell them locally.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Tony Begulio and Nick Digeralamo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13391: United States vs. Tony Begulio and Nick Digeralamo, defendants. The defendants were charged with illegally removing "distilled spirits on which the tax had not been paid" from a distillery.

January 1, 1936
U.S. vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio and Gaston Van Ross: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9518: United States vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio, and Gaston Van Ross, defendants. The document reports that Angelo Distassio was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day in the United States Industrial Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio. Distassio was delivered to the superintendent of the reformatory on November 19, 1929.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio and Gaston Van Ross: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9518: United States vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio, and Gaston Van Ross, defendants. The document reports that Gaston Van Ross was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. Van Ross was delivered to the Jackson County jailer on July 27, 1929, due to the Clay County jail being under investigation at the time.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio and Gaston Van Ross: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9518: United States vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio, and Gaston Van Ross, defendants. The document reports that Ellis Titus Buice was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. Buice was delivered to the Jackson County jailer on July 27, 1929, due to the Clay County jail being under investigation at the time.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio and Gaston Van Ross: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 9518: United States vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio, and Gaston Van Ross, defendants. The defendants were charged with National Prohibition Act violations in multiple counts: in Count I, possession and unregistered 100-gallon whiskey still; in Count II, operating an unbonded distillery; in Count III, operating a distillery "with the intent to defraud the United States of America of the tax on the spirits"; in Count IV, operating a distillery "in a dwelling house" located at 1324 Lydia Avenue; in Count V, possessing ten gallons of whiskey; and in Count VI, maintaining a common nuisance at the aforementioned address.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Tony Casciola: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 9518: United States vs. Tony Casciola, Ellis Titus Buice, Angelo Distassio, and Gaston Van Ross, defendants. The document reports that Tony Casciola was charged with violating the Prohibition Act, and sentenced to serve one year and one day in the United States Industrial Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio. Casciola was delivered to the superintendent of the reformatory on November 17, 1929.

January 1, 1929
U.S. vs. Tony Leptino: Commitment

Incomplete commitment in Criminal Case No. 8557: United States vs. Tony Leptino, defendant. The document notes that Leptino was delivered to the warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, to serve a sentence after being convicted of a Prohibition Act violation.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Tony Leptino: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8567: United States vs. Tony Leptino, defendant. Count I of the indictment reports that in 1924, Leptino entered a plea of guilty to a charge of selling one pint of whiskey in violation of the National Prohibition Act, and was sentenced to four months in the Buchanan County Jail and a one hundred dollar fine. It then charges Leptino, in a second offense, of selling four ounces of whiskey in November 1927. Count II describes Leptino's 1924 plea of guilty to possession of three pints of whiskey, and charges that Leptino, in a second offense, was in possession of a half-gallon of whiskey in November 1927. Count III further charges that Leptino maintained a "common nuisance" at 602 Main Street, "where intoxicating liquors ... [were] kept, possessed, stored and sold, in violation of the National Prohibition Act.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Tony Leptino: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8557: United States vs. Tony Leptino, defendant. The document summarizes facts of the case, including the defendant's arrest on November 11, 1927, witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys representing each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley ordered a recognizance of $1500.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1927
U.S. vs. Walter Davis: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14697: United States vs. Walter Davis, defendant. Davis was charged with the purchase of 10 "marihuana cigarettes," without having paid the transfer tax, at 538 Main Street in Kansas City.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Walter Davis: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14697: United States vs. Walter Davis, defendant. Davis entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to four months in jail.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Complaint

Complaint for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. In this document, Thomas J. Layson calls upon the court to charge the defendants with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy. Layson also charges the defendants with ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Final Mittimus

Final Mittimus for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. This document orders the marshal to transport the defendant George L. McGee to prison with a bail of $25,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. The defendants are charged with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy, and ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Warrant to Apprehend

Warrant to Apprehend for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. This document calls for the arrest of the defendants charged with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy, and ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. William E. Clifford, Anthony R. Gizzo, and August Spearo: Indictment

The indictment for Criminal Case No. 6207: U.S. vs. William E. Clifford, Anthony R. Gizzo, and August Spearo. Since the issuance of the warrant to apprehend, August Spearo's name is dropped from the case. The remaining men are charged with having in their possession fifteen ounces of morphine, one pound of gum opium, and 21 ounces of cocaine. Gizzo was widely known as part of the Kansas City Mafia and as lieutenant to John Lazia, Kansas City North End political boss.

U.S. vs. William E. Clifford, Anthony R. Gizzo, and August Spearo: Warrant to Apprehend

A warrant to apprehend William E. Clifford, Anthony R. Gizzo, and August Spearo to answer for charges placed against them by the United States of America in criminal case No. 6207. These men are charged with having in their possession "17 ounces of morphine and about 21 ounces of cocaine and one pound of gum opium." Gizzo was widely known as part of the Kansas City Mafia and as lieutenant to John Lazia, Kansas City North End political boss.

U.S. vs. Willie Cox: Commitment

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 11781: United States vs. Gus Gargotta, Hallitt Perkins, Willie Cox, Fred Sorisso and George Evans, defendants. The document reports that Willie Cox was charged in four counts with violating the Prohibition Act. He entered a plea of guilty to the fourth count and was sentenced to serve one month at the Clay County Jail in Liberty, Missouri. Gargotta was delivered to the jailer on October 24, 1932.

January 1, 1932