Court Cases

Machine Politics, Organized Crime, and Reform

Title Description Year
American Insurance Company vs. Ray B. Lucas and Roy McKittrick: Excerpt

Excerpt of an unabridged print of American Insurance Company, Plaintiff, vs. Ray B. Lucas, Superintendent of the Insurance Department of the State of Missouri, and Roy McKittrick, Attorney General of the State of Missouri, Defendants. This excerpt provides the table of contents for the unabridged case and details the most scandalous criminal activity of the court case. These activities include bribery and illegal money collection involving Thomas J. Pendergast, R. Emmett O'Malley, A. L. McCormack and C. R. Street in 1935.

Missouri vs. John Gadwood: Information

Information provided by Prosecuting Attorney W. W. Graves for Criminal Case No. 34750: State of Missouri vs. John Gadwood. Graves charges Gadwood with the murder of Lee Flacy on May 27, 1934. The alleged murder occured "during a city election in Kansas City at a restuarant located at 5824 Swope Parkway, two doors from the polling place for the 25th precinct of the 16th ward." [Taken from a Opinion from the Supreme Court of Missouri.] Gadwood was the "rabbit" faction ward leader and Flacy was a "goat" faction precinct captain. This document is an excerpt of the full trial transcript.

January 1, 1934
Missouri vs. John Gadwood: Opinion

Court Opinion by Judge George R. Ellison for Criminal Case No. 34750: State of Missouri vs. John Gadwood, Appellant. Upon reviewing the assignments of error in Gadwood's motion for a new trial, Ellison affirms that Gadwood was guilty of murdering Lee Flacy on March 27, 1934. The alleged murder occurred "during a city election in Kansas City at a restaurant located at 5824 Swope Parkway, two doors from the polling place for the 25th precinct of the 16th ward." Gadwood was the "rabbit" faction ward leader and Flacy was a "goat" faction precinct captain.

January 1, 1937
Missouri vs. Oscar Rowe: Opinion

Court Opinion by Commissioner Walter N. Davis for Criminal Case No. 30129: State of Missouri vs. Oscar Rowe, Appellant. Kansas City Republican Precinct Captain Oscar Rowe was found guilty of giving corn whiskey to Arch Duncan as part of a larger scheme to deprive Democratic voters from voting in the November 6, 1928 presidential election. Rowe operated an establishment at 602 Main Street, Kansas City, MO that was licensed as a soft drink parlor and cigar store, but was in fact an establishment of gambling, prostitution, and illegal liquor consumption. The evidence shows that in collaboration with the Republican run Kansas City Police Department, Rowe and his associates "would lift the heads of the drunken men in the basement and pour whiskey down their throats. Some two hundred men were in the basement in all stages of intoxication. Some were pitifully drunk and lying on the floor. The valuables of those lured into the place were taken and retained. Around 2 o’clock A. M. on November 6, 1928, the police wagons arrived. The wagons were used to convey the drunken men found in the basement to the holdover. No charges were preferred against them." The court finds that the appellant's motion for a new trial is without merit and that Rowe's verdict of five years in a penitentiary is affirmed.

January 1, 1930
Missouri vs. Waller W. Graves: Opinion

Court Opinion by Judge Charles Thomas Hays for Case for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. Hays finds Graves guilty of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Hays provides some of the evidence used in making his decision. Graves is thus removed from his office of prosecuting attorney of Jackson County and fined $1000.

January 1, 1940
Missouri vs. Waller W. Graves: Order to Show Cause

Order to Show Cause for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. This document accuses Graves of purposefully neglecting his duties in prosecuting individuals in Jackson County openly engaging in voter fraud, the operation of gambling and prostitution establishments, and the sale of liquor late at night and on Sundays. Missouri Supreme Court Clerk E. F. Elliot orders Graves to come before the court and answer to these allegations.

January 1, 1939
Missouri vs. Waller W. Graves: Special Commissioner's Report

Special Commissioner's Report by Leon P. Embry for Case No. 36717: State of Missouri on the information of Roy McKittrick, Attorney General, Relator, vs. Waller W. Graves, Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri, Respondent. Embry presents his findings of fact and conclusion of law in which he discusses "whether or not a public officer may be removed or ousted from office during one term because of misconduct or derelictions occurring during a prior term, or prior terms, of office." Embry discusses in detail a case in which Graves allegedly dismissed improperly: State v. Gargotta in which Gargotta was charged with assault with the intent to murder Thomas B. Bash, sheriff of Jackson County. Embry also discusses Graves' handling of election law violations in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. It is this latter incident that Embry finds Graves guilty of dereliction of duty as Prosecuting Attorney of Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1940
State ex rel. County of Jackson, State of Missouri, et al. vs. Marion D. Waltner: Opinion

Court Opinion by Judge George R. Ellison for Case No. 35302: State ex rel. County of Jackson, State of Missouri, David E. Long, J.W. Hostetter and Battle McCardle, as judges of the county court of Jackson County, Missouri, and William Hicks, as clerk of the county court of Jackson County, Missouri, petitioners, vs. Honorable Marion D. Waltner, Judge of the circuit court of Jackson County, Missouri, and Clarence B. Reed, respondents. Ellison details respondent Reed's petition for injunction to contest the results of a bond election during the August 1936 primary. Reed alleges that the Pendergast Machine organized mass voter fraud in part to approve the local bonds, and then provides examples of the same. Ellison concludes that the respondents do not have jurisdiction in order to contest the election, regardless of the validity of the facts presented.

January 1, 1936
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Answer to Petition in Equity

An answer to the petition in equity for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. In this answer, Howell denies the plaintiff’s claims and “prays that the decision and order of the defendant as said Prohibition Director be affirmed and that plaintiff’s petition be dismissed at plaintiff’s cost.”

January 1, 1920
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Motion and Orders to Reinstate Case

One motion and two orders for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. In these documents, the plaintiff motions to reinstate the case in equity and the court orders the same.

January 1, 1922
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Petition in Equity and Attached Exhibits

A petition in equity and attached exhibits for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. In this petition, T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company asks the court to settle a dispute with Howell, who issued the company an order “that [their liquor] permit… is revoked and canceled.” The petitioner reaffirms “that it at all times in good faith conformed to the provisions of the National Prohibition Act.”

January 1, 1920
T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company vs. Shrader P. Howell: Subpoena in Chancery

A subpoena in chancery for the case of T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company, Plaintiff, vs. Shrader P. Howell, Federal Prohibition Director of Missouri, Defendant. This subpoena commands Howell to be present at the U.S. District Court in Kansas City on December 23, 1920 to answer for the claims made by the T. J. Pendergast Wholesale Liquor Company.

January 1, 1920
U.S. vs. Bruno Nicoli, Margaret Jewell, Frank George Fellers, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13946: United States vs. Bruno Nicoli, Margaret Jewell (formerly McGlothlin), Frank George Fellers, Nina Ruth Fellers, Louise Frances Stroube, and Dorothy Brown, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 9th Precinct of the 10th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 60 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Nicoli, Jewell, and Frank George and Nina Ruth Fellers were acting as election judges, and Stroube and Brown served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Bruno Nicoli, Margaret Jewell, Frank George Fellers, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13946: United States vs. Bruno Nicoli, Margaret Jewell (formerly McGlothlin), Frank George Fellers, Nina Ruth Fellers, Louise Frances Stroube, and Dorothy Brown, defendants. Nicoli entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to four months in jail and a fine of $250. Jewell and Nina Ruth Fellers entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced to jail for three month, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $250. Frank George Fellers entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to penitentiary for one year and one day and a fine of $100. Stroube and Brown entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced to jail for ten days and a fine of $100.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Callie Clark, Lorne E. Wells, Frank H. Adams, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13650: United States vs. Callie Clark, Lorne E. Wells, Frank H. Adams, Joe R. Wells, Jr., Pearl Sperry, John A. Luteran, and Leo B. Roach, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 17th Precinct of 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

U.S. vs. Callie Clark, Lorne E. Wells, Frank H. Adams, et al.: Remarks of the Court Before Imposing Sentences

Remarks of the court on Thursday, February 25, 1937, before imposing sentences for Criminal Case No. 13650: United States vs. Callie Clark, Lorne E. Wells, Frank H. Adams, Joe R. Wells, Jr., Pearl Sperry, John A. Luteran, and Leo B. Roach, Defendants. This document states that there is no question of the defendants guilt; "The only reliance of defendants is the hope... that perhaps the exact and precise conspiracy charged in the indictment is not amony the several of which unquestionably they are guilty." The document also remarks on civic ethics in elections.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Application for Bill of Particulars

Application for bill of particulars in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant, stating that specific matters in the indictment are "vague, indefinite, uncertain, ambiguous, equivocal, and contradictory." The document requests more names, locations, and other details of the "gambling parlors" and "gambling games" that Carrollo is accused of profiting from.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Application for Bill of Particulars

Application for bill of particulars in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant, stating that specific matters in the indictment are "vague, indefinite, uncertain, ambiguous, equivocal, and contradictory." The document requests more names, locations, and other details of the "gambling establishments" that Carrollo is accused of collecting, or authorizing other people to collect, "lug and protection money" from. The names of other people authorized to make collections are also requested, as well as a definition of "lug and protection money," and the amounts and other specifics of that money. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Docket Entries

Docket entries in Criminal Case No. 14639: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss. The document lists the timeline of events in the case, including the indictment filing on July 21, 1939, guilty pleas on counts 3 and 4 on October 19, 1939, and sentencing on October 29, 1939. Carrollo was committed to the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth on November 14, 1939, and a notice of appeal was filed on September 9, 1943.

January 1, 1943
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles V. Carrrollo, defendant. Carollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with "wilfully ... attempting to evade and defeat a large part of the income tax upon his net income" for 1937 and 1938. The untaxed income at issue is alleged to be "lug and protection money from gambling establishments."

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14639: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with income tax evasion in the years 1935-1939. The indictment details his sources of income, including smoke and cigar shops, gaming and gambling operations, casinos, liquor distributors, and nightclubs and bars.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14573: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged in connection with his application for naturalization as a United States citizen. The indictment states that Carrollo had, under oath, sworn that during the years prior to filing for naturalization, he had "behaved as a personal of good moral character," and specifically, that he had denied receiving any profit from gambling or gaming. The indictment charges that he knowingly perjured himself in doing so. Carrollo was deported to Italy in 1954 after serving a prison sentence at Alcatraz.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, a Kansas City mob boss, was found guilty in the charge of perjury and sentenced to four years in the penitentiary.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14581: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to one year and one day in penitentiary, to run consecutively with his sentence in case No. 14578.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Carrollo: Sentencing

Sentencing in Criminal Case No. 14578: United States vs. Charles Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was found guilty of perjury by jury trial. Judge Merrill E. Otis writes that the proof of Carrollo's guilt was "overwhelming," discusses the seriousness of perjury as "gravely threatening to the well-being of the state," and notes that the maximum punishment allowed is five years' imprisonment and a $2,000 fine. Otis also notes that Carrollo had a prior criminal record, and as an immigrant, "sought to repay the people of the United States for the welcome they had extended ... by violating and defying their laws." Carrollo received a sentence of four years in the penitentiary for case No. 14578. Otis further sentenced Carrollo, after he plead guilty in case No. 14581, to one year and one day in the penitentiary, to be served consecutively with the previous sentence. Otis also handled sentencing for case No. 14639, in which Carrollo plead guilty to two counts of tax evasion. Otis sentenced the defendant in this case to three years in the penitentiary and repayment of the income taxes, interest, and penalties due for the years 1938 and 1938, and notes the pentalty alone totals over $80,000.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles Cartello, Robert McKinney, John Brown, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13684: United States vs. Charles Cartello, Robert McKinney, John Brown (alias Dan D. Brown), Edward C. Duncan, and Edward J. Schmidt, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 8th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Thirty-five votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Cartello, McKinney, Brown, and Lemon were acting as election judges, and Duncan and Ella Lynch served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta was charged in three counts related to the possession and concealment of two .45 caliber pistols that had been stolen from the National Guard Armory in Kansas City, Kansas. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Statement

Statement made by Charles Gargotta in Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. Gargotta made a statement to Prosecuting Attorney T. A. J. Mastin in which he indicated that he was arrested on the street after leaving a woman's apartment on Armour Boulevard. He claimed that he only heard shooting to the east of him, and was not only was he unarmed at the time of his arrest, but that he had never owned an automatic pistol. He also took issue with other details of the case. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Charles Gargotta: Verdict

Verdict in the trial of Criminal Case No. 12584: United States vs. Charles Gargotta, defendant. The defendant was found guilty in all three counts of illegal weapons charges. Gargotta was a Pendergast ally and organized crime leader, and the case is part of a shootout incident involving Sheriff Thomas Bash, rival bootlegger Ferris Anthon, and others.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. Charles J. Burton, Marie Wimmer, John J. White, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13768: United States vs. Charles J. Burton, Marie Wimmer, John J. White, Goldie Ricehouse, Earl Lanne, and Beatrice Jackman, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 2nd Precinct of the 11th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Almost 50 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Burton, Wimmer, White, and Ricehouse were acting as election judges, and Lanne and Jackman served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Charles J. Burton, Marie Wimmer, John J. White, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13768: United States vs. Charles J. Burton, Marie Wimmer, John J. White, Goldie Ricehouse, Earl Lanne, and Beatrice Jackman, defendants. Burton entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for two months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $200. Wimmer entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for six months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $500. White entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi to count one, and was sentenced to jail for five months and a fine of $1,000. His sentence was later altered to consist of two years probation. Ricehouse entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for thirty days, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $100. Burton entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for two months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $200. Lanne and Jackman entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were placed on two years probation.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Charles V. Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Charles V. Carrollo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14462: United States vs. Charles V. Carrollo, defendant. Carrollo, aka "Charlie the Wop," was a Kansas City mob boss, and was charged with mailing a letter and unsigned bill of sale granting one-quarter ownership of a lottery-style gaming operation, the Fortune Skill-Ball game, at 2 West 39th Street.

U.S. vs. Daniel Raymond Griffith, Ina May Lavery, Lula K. Barnard, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14057: United States vs. Daniel Raymond Griffith, Ina May Lavery, Lula K. Barnard, Lois Mannon Puffer, Charles Franklin Baldwin, Minerva Grubbs Kenmuir, George Stephen Hayde, John William Curns, and Martha J. Baldwin, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 2nd Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 70 votes were shifted from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Griffith, Lavery, Barnard, and Puffer were acting as election judges, and Baldwin and Kenmuir served as election clerks.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, et al.: Court's Ruling on Motions for New Trial, and Sentences

Court's ruling on motions for new trial, and sentences in Criminal Case No. 13682: United States vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, Nancy Constable, Everett Pippin, Bessie D. Adams, Charles H. Kaiser, and James McNamara, defendants. Defendants appeared for sentencing beginning on April 16, 1937, and the court rejected Shannabarger's attorneys motion for a new trial. The court also suggests that the evidence against the defendants serving as election clerks was not as strong as against the other defendants, and that the evidence against Shannabarger, Bodenhammer, and Constable was not as strong as against the other election judges, Kaiser, McNamara, and Brennan. The manner in which ballots were falsified is also described in the transcript.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13682: United States vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, Nancy Constable, Everett Pippin, Bessie D. Adams, Charles H. Kaiser, and James McNamara, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 22nd Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 50 votes votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and a similar number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Shannabarger, Brennan, Bodenhammer, and Constable were acting as election judges, and Pippin and Adams served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, et al.: Jurors' Verdict

Jurors' verdict in Criminal Case No. 13682: United States vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, Nancy Constable, Everett Pippin, Bessie D. Adams, Charles H. Kaiser, and James McNamara, defendants. C. A. Chambers, foreman of the jurors for the case, reports that the jury finds all defendants guilty as charged. Chambers recommends leniency for Nancy Bodenhammer, Nancy Constable, and Bessie D. Adams.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. E. D. Shannabarger, Irene Brennan, Nancy Bodenhammer, et al.: Memorandum and Orders

Memorandum and orders from District Judge Merrill E. Otis on pleas in abatement, demurrers and motions to quash, and motions to squash petit jury panel in Criminal Cases No. 13682 and 13684. The document states that the reasons for overruling similar pleas in other cases are laid out in Case No. 13646, and then addresses the motion to quash the petit grand jury panel, and in doing so describes the process wherein letters of recommendation for suitable jurors were sought from prominent members of the community, and then those individuals would be randomly selected. The defense counsel argues that the solicitation letter was discriminatory in requesting "men of business affairs," thereby barring individuals engaged in other work or who are unemployed. The judge argues that in context, the request implies simply that they do not want "mere ne'er-do-wells, mere loafers, [or] mere hangers-on," but want a "higher type of juror," and so overrules the motion.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, et al.: Commitments

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 13648: United States vs. United States vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, Elijah Burke, Anna V. O'Laughlin, Tessie Mears, and John L. Drummond, defendants. The documents report that Walker and Drummond were convicted by the jury and sentenced to two years at the U.S. Penitentiary in Leavenworth, Kansas, and were delivered to the warden on April 30, 1938.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13648: United States vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, Elijah Burke, Anna V. O'Laughlin, Tessie Mears, and John L. Drummond, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 13th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 100 votes votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and a similar number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Walker, McEntee, Albright, and Burke were acting as election judges, and O'Laughlin and Mears served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, et al.: Remarks of the Court Before Imposing Sentences

Remarks of the court before imposing sentences in Criminal Case No. 13648: United States vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, Elijah Burke, Anna V. O'Laughlin, Tessie Mears, and John L. Drummond, defendants. District Judge Merrill Otis discusses the harm done by election fraud, and states that "there is no pretense that the defendants are not guilty of almost every conceivable ballot box crime." He hopes these convictions convince the public to not be discouraged from voting in the future.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, et al.: Verdict

Verdict in the trial of Criminal Case No. 13648: United States vs. Edson M. Walker, Loretta McEntee, Chloe G. Albright, Elijah Burke, Anna V. O'Laughlin, Tessie Mears, and John L. Drummond, defendants. Walker and Drummond were found guilty in the second count of the indictment. McEntee, Burke, and O'Laughlin received no verdict.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13646: United States vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, Louise Davis, Ruth Tucker, and Frances M. Eaton, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 15th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 100 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and a similar number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Buck, Brenner, Doss, and Davis were acting as election judges, and Tucker and Eaton served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13754: United States vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, Louise Davis, Ruth Tucker, Frances M. Eaton, Ernest Williams, Herman Supofsky, Elva O'Byrne, and Frances B. Ryan, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 15th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 100 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Buck, Brenner, Doss, and Davis were acting as election judges, and Tucker and Eaton served as election clerks.

U.S. vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitment in Criminal Case No. 13754: United States vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, Louise Davis, Ruth Tucker, Frances M. Eaton, Ernest Williams, Herman Supofsky, Elva O'Byrne, and Frances B. Ryan, defendants. The documents report that Buck and Tucker were found guilty of the second count, the first having been entered nolle prosequi, and were sentenced to one month in jail and a fine of $100. Brenner and Williams were found guilty of the second count, the first having been entered nolle prosequi, and were sentenced to two years in the penitentiary and a fine of $100. Doss and Davis entered pleas of nolo contendere to the second count, the first having been entered nolle prosequi, and were sentenced to ten days in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $25. Supofsky was found guilty of the second count, the first having been entered nolle prosequi, and was sentenced to six months in jail and a fine of $100. O'Byrne was declined court-appointed counsel and was found guilty of the second count, the first having been entered nolle prosequi, and was sentenced to six months in jail, suspected for two years probation, and a fine of $120. Ryan was found guilty of the second count, the first having been entered nolle prosequi, and was sentenced to three years in jail and a fine of $500.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, et al.: Memorandum

Memorandum from District Judge Merrill E. Otis ruling on affidavits of prejudice filed by defendants in Criminal Case No. 13646, and also addresses case numbers 13648, 13676, 13678, 13682, and 13684. Otis writes that he believes there is "no merit whatever in these affidavits" and rejects he has any prejudice in these cases.

U.S. vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, et al.: Memorandum Opinion and Orders

Memorandum opinion and orders dealing with demurrers and motions to squash, pleas in abatement and motions to strike such pleas in abatement in Criminal Cases Nos. 13646, 13648, and 13650. Due to the similarities of the cases, only No. 13646 is addressed in detail. The demurrers and motions to squash argue about what and how voters' rights are violated when counts are switched from the intended candidate to another vs. simply not being counted, whether citizens indeed possess a right to vote for members of Congress, the level of detail included in the describtion of the charges, and other potential issues with the indictments as written. District Judge Merrill E. Otis overrules these arguments. The pleas in abatement are based on a claim that Judge Albert L. Reeves was "intemperate, inflammatory, argumentative, prejudicial" to the grand jury that returned the indictments. Judge Otis writes that there is nothing to justify the idea that the grand jurors acted "only as a group of puppets, robbed of their reason" in bringing the indictments, and that the pleas should be overruled.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8460: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. DeMayo was charged with possession of a Liberty Bond worth $5000 that had been stolen from the mail, "with intent to convert the same to his own use and gain and to deprive the owner of the use thereof."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 8460: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. DeMayo was charged with receiving and possessing a knowingly-stolen Liberty Bond worth $5000 "with intent to convert the same to his own use and gain and to deprive the owner of the use thereof."

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo: Report of Trial

Report of trial for Criminal Case No. 8461: United States vs. Frank "Chee Chee" DeMayo, defendant. The document summarizes events of the case, including the defendant's arrest on April 2, 1928, the witnesses who appeared, and the attorneys appearing on each side. Commissioner George D. Beardsley held that DeMayo was "probably guilty," ordered a recognizance of $5000.00, and ordered him to appear in the District Court on April 23, 1928.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Fred A. Bird, Wanda E. Edmiston, William W. Seavy, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13945: United States vs. Fred A. Bird, Wanda E. Edmiston, William W. Seavy, James B. Redwine, Ethel Ellen Holliday, and Jean Sote, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 1st Precinct of the 11th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 40 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Bird, Edmiston, Seavy, and Redwine were acting as election judges, and Holliday and Sote served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Fred A. Bird, Wanda E. Edmiston, William W. Seavy, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13945: United States vs. Fred A. Bird, Wanda E. Edmiston, William W. Seavy, James B. Redwine, Ethel Ellen Holliday, and Jean Sote, defendants. Bird entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to six months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $400. Seavy entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for six month, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $300. Redwine entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for three month, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $200. Holliday and Sote entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced a fine of $100.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Fred Johnston, Leona M. O'Brien, John F. Green, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13952: United States vs. Fred Johnston, Leona M. O'Brien, John F. Green, Elizabeth England, Clara Wilk, and Merle Thompson, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 21st Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Almost 40 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Johnston, O'Brien, Green, and England were acting as election judges, and Wilk and Thompson served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. George Arnold, Gene Riley, Irene Irvin, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13739: United States vs. George Arnold, Gene Riley, Irene Irvin, Robert Strohm, and Thomas Audley, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 7th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 60 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Arnold, Riley, Hallie Sperry, and Roy A. Best were acting as election judges, and Irwin and Viola Fellows served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. George Arnold, Gene Riley, Irene Irvin, et al.: Judgment and Sentence

Judgments and sentence in Criminal Case No. 13739: United States vs. George Arnold, Gene Riley, Irene Irvin, Robert Strohm, and Thomas Audley, defendants. A motion for new trial was overruled. The documents also reports that Arnold entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to two years in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, suspected for two years of probation, and a fine of $100 for each of two counts. Riley, Irvin, Strohm, and Audley were tried by a jury and found guilty. Riley was sentenced to two years at the U.S. Southwestern Reformatory at El Reno, Oklahoma, for two years, and a fine of $500 on each of two counts. Irvin was sentenced to sixty days at the Clay County Jail at Liberty, Missouri, and a fine of $100 on each of two counts. Strohm was sentenced to five years at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, and a fine of $500 for each of two counts. Audley was sentenced to three years at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, and a fine of $500 on each of two counts.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Harley Sampson, William Thomas Murphy, Charles McCormick, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14111: United States vs. Harley Sampson, William Thomas Murphy, Charles McCormick, Margaret Sinsabaugh, Alice Reta Fisher, Mary Doe, alias Carrie Cole, Ola Colley, and William F. Murphy, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 6th Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

U.S. vs. Harley Sampson, William Thomas Murphy, Charles McCormick, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitments for Criminal Case No. 14111: United States vs. Harley Sampson, William Thomas Murphy, Charles McCormick, Margaret Sinsabaugh, Alice Reta Fisher, Mary Doe, alias Carrie Cole, Ola Colley, and William F. Murphy, Defendants. The defendants were sentenced from three months to one year in prison and/or fined from $25.00 to $2,000.00.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Harry Goldberg, Dennis Sheedy, Frank Mulvihill, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14117: United States vs. Harry Goldberg, Dennis Sheedy, Frank Mulvihill, Mary Goldstein, William A. Gorman, Dick Burrus, and Ralph "Red" Rosenberg, defendants. Goldberg and Rosenberg entered pleas of guilty and were sentenced to jail for six months and a fine of $1,000. Goldstein entered a plea of nolo contendere was sentenced to six months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $500. Gorman entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to jail for three months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $250.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Harry Goldberg, Dennis Sheedy, Frank Mulvihill, et al: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14117: United States vs. Harry Goldberg, Dennis Sheedy, Frank Mulvihill, Mary Goldstein, William A. Gorman, Dick Burrus, and Ralph "Red" Rosenberg, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 15th Precinct of the 1st Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 80 votes were shifted from Lowell R. Johnson to Joseph B. Shannon in the 5th District Congressional race. Goldberg, Sheedy, Mulvihill, and Goldstein were acting as election judges, and Gorman and Burrus served as election clerks.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Henry T. Johnston, Vernie McCollum, Bertha Patterson, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13756: United States vs. Henry T. Johnston, Vernie McCollum, Bertha Patterson, Florence Buchanan, Edward Hogendorn, I. Vaughn Buchanan, and Harry O. Mittong, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 23rd Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Henry T. Johnston, Vernie McCollum, Bertha Patterson, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgement and commitment/orders for the defendants in Criminal Case No. 13756: United States vs. Henry T. Johnston, Vernie McCollum, Bertha Patterson, Florence Buchanan, Edward Hogendorn, I. Vaughn Buchanan, and Harry O. Mittong, Defendants. Johnston, F. Buchanan, I. Buchanan, and Mittong were sentenced from three to seven months in jail and fined from $250.00 to $1,000.00. McCollum, Patterson, and Hogendorn were given two years probation.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. J. R. Hennessey, Sam Goucher, Lula Overly, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13683: United States vs. J. R. Hennessey, Sam Gougher, Lula Overly, Charles O. Jackson, Viola Turner, and Jack Turner, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 24nd Precinct of the 9th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 30 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and a similar number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Hennessey, Goucher, Overly, and Jackson were acting as election judges, and Turner and Julia Wonderly, who is not named as a defendant, served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. J. R. Hennessey, Sam Goucher, Lula Overly, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitment in Criminal Case No. 13683: United States vs. J. R. Hennessey, Sam Goucher, Lula Overly, Charles O. Jackson, Viola Turner, and Jack Turner, defendants. The documents report that Hennessey, Overly, Jackson, and Viola Turner entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to two months in jail, then suspended for two years probation, and a $250 fine. Goucher entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to three months in jail, then suspended for two years probation, and a $250 fine. Turner entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to six months in jail, then suspended for two years probation, and a $1000 fine.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. James Callahan, Frank Geier, May Bartlett, Geneva Vielbig, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13677: United States vs. James Callahan, Frank Geier, May Bartlett, Geneva Vielbig, Maude Hancher, Frank Gumminger, James Carter, and Mike Cummings, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 18th Precinct of the 3rd Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. James Callahan, Frank Geier, May Bartlett, Geneva Vielbig, et al.: Judgment and Sentence

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13677: United States vs. James Callahan, Frank Geier, May Bartlett, Geneva Vielbig, Maude Hancher, Frank Gumminger, James Carter, and Mike Cummings, Defendants. The document states that Callahan, Geier, Gumminger, Carter, and Cummings were found guilty and that Bartlett, Vielbig, and Hancher had pleaded nolo contendere ("no contest").

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. James Callahan, Frank Geier, May Bartlett, Geneva Vielbig, et al.: Judgment and Sentence

Judgment and commitments for selected defendants in Criminal Case No. 13677: United States vs. James Callahan, Frank Geier, May Bartlett, Geneva Vielbig, Maude Hancher, Frank Gumminger, James Carter, and Mike Cummings, Defendants. Each of the selected defendants were sentenced six to eight months in jail and fined $1000.00.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Jennie Sanders, LaVerne Lang, Benjamin F. Bybee, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13838: United States vs. Jennie Sanders, LaVerne Lang, Benjamin F. Bybee, Joe Mahoney, Dan McCarty, John Cosgrove, and Dan Pierce, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 9th Precinct of the 15th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 30 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Bybee, Minnie Ingels, Lang, and Sanders were acting as election judges, and G. Heath Reid and Elizabeth Bendure served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Jennie Sanders, LaVerne Lang, Benjamin F. Bybee, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13838: United States vs. Jennie Sanders, LaVerne Lang, Benjamin F. Bybee, Joe Mahoney, Dan McCarty, John Cosgrove, and Dan Pierce, defendants. Sanders entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and was sentenced to jail for one month and a fine of $25. Lang entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was fined $100. Green and Bybee entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and received a sentence of two years probation. Mahoney, Cosgrove and Pierce entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and received sentences of three months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a $200 fine.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14114: United States vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, Leo Felix Lippert, Rossen Lowe, alias Ross L. Lowe, Leota Forest Bell, Anna Ruble, Mary Ernest, and Martha J. Baldwin, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 4th Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitments for Criminal Case No. 14114: United States vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, Leo Felix Lippert, Rossen Lowe, alias Ross L. Lowe, Leota Forest Bell, Anna Ruble, Mary Ernest, and Martha J. Baldwin, Defendants. The defendants were sentenced from six months to one year in prison and/or fined from $25.00 to $300.00. The imprisonment sentences of Hunt, Lowe, and Baldwin were immediately suspended and they were put on two years probation.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, et al.: Letters in Support of Early Release

Letters in support of Chester J. McKaughan's early release in Criminal Case No. 14114: United States vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, Leo Felix Lippert, Rossen Lowe, alias Ross L. Lowe, Leota Forest Bell, Anna Ruble, Mary Ernest, and Martha J. Baldwin, Defendants. These ten letters were written by friends and family of McKaughan requesting that he be released from prison early. They attest that his mother is an invalid and needs his help.

U.S. vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, et al.: Order Modifying Sentence

Order modifying sentence of Chester J. McKaughan for Criminal Case No. 14114: United States vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, Leo Felix Lippert, Rossen Lowe, alias Ross L. Lowe, Leota Forest Bell, Anna Ruble, Mary Ernest, and Martha J. Baldwin, Defendants. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis orders that the sentence of McKaughan be modified from one year and one day in prison to eight months with a $100.00 fine.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, et al.: Order Modifying Sentence

Order modifying sentence of Chester J. McKaughan for Criminal Case No. 14114: United States vs. Joe Lawless, Chester J. McKaughan, Gilbert Hunt, Leo Felix Lippert, Rossen Lowe, alias Ross L. Lowe, Leota Forest Bell, Anna Ruble, Mary Ernest, and Martha J. Baldwin, Defendants. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis heeds the request of McKaughan's friends and family and orders that his prison sentence be further reduced from eight to six months.

U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Application for Surety and Recognizance for Appearance

Application for Surety and Recognizance for Appearance Before U.S. Court for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In these two documents, Morris E. Whitney acts as surety for Frank Mulloy's recognizance for appearance in court.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. The defendants are charged with the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol in violation of the National Prohibition Act. The defendants were all suspected of being affiliated with the Kansas City Mafia.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Motion for Bill of Particulars

Motion for Bill of Particulars for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, defendant Rosemary Lyons requests more information as to her alleged involvement in the prolonged conspiracy set forth in the indictment. She requests this information so that she may more adequately prepare her defense.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Order for Destruction of Contraband Property

Order for destruction of contrabad property in Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis orders confiscated liquor to be destroyed.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Order for Transfer of Alcohol

Order in Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, Judge Albert L. Reeves orders fifty gallons of grain alcohol confiscated from Guy Brock to be transferred to the Children's Mercy Hospital at Kansas City, Missouri for medicinal purposes.

January 1, 1932
U.S. vs. Joe Pasano, Frank Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, John Lazia, et al.: Plea of Guilty by Defendant D. L. Pickett

Plea of Guilty by Defendant D. L. Pickett for Criminal Case No. 10839: United States vs. Joe Pasano, Frank B. Mulloy, Ralph Rosenberg, William A. Cacy, Leopold Schwarz, Lawrence Cipolla, William G. Michael, Roy Barrett, Robert Carnahan, Frank Martin, Noxie Barber, Tudia Pasano, George Galbraith, Lawrence Cardella, Joe Toia, Walter A. Porter, Adolph Sutter, Edward S. Alderson, Joe Kleason, Eugene F. Moore, Jimmie Hicks, Ott Holmes, Jimmie LaCapra, Red Oaks, Walter Skinner, Martin Wiseman, Ray Broom, Max Cohen, James Stiff, Carl A. Wahlin, Grant T. Moffatt, D. L. Pickett, Sam Hogg, June Kathren, Newton Guy Brock, James B. Franklin, Rosemary Lyons, John Lazia, Charles Corrolla, Charles W. Corbett, William McMurray, John Roth, Thomas G. Bramlett, Charlie Jenson, Louis Kent Berger, James H. Burton, Sam Eddy, and The North Side Finance Company, Defendants. In this document, defendant D. L. Pickett pleas guilty of the charges set forth in the indictment. Pickett is then ordered to pay a fine of $500.00.

January 1, 1931
U.S. vs. John Francis Harnett, Thomas J. Maloney, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14110: United States vs. John Francis Harnett, Thomas J. Maloney, Fred Foster, Kennedy, Rose Probst, John August Maddy, William M. Johnston, Louis William Le Grand, Margaret May Bergman, Linna Johnston, Ollie Ratcliff, and Mildred Teale, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 20th Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. John Francis Harnett, Thomas J. Maloney, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgement and commitments for Criminal Case No. 14110: United States vs. John Francis Harnett, Thomas J. Maloney, Fred Foster, Kennedy, Rose Probst, John August Maddy, William M. Johnston, Louis William Le Grand, Margaret May Bergman, Linna Johnston, Ollie Ratcliff, and Mildred Teale, Defendants. The defendants were sentenced from five weeks to one year in prison and/or fined from $100.00 to $300.00.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. John J. Pryor: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14742: United States vs. John J. Pryor, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendant is charged with income tax fraud for the calendar years 1934 through 1937. Pryor, co-owner of Boyle-Pryor Construction Company, reported $12,000 in gross income in 1934 while the true figure was $206,487.05. His reported gross income figured to only $403 in income tax due; his actual earnings required him to pay $81,751.08.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. John J. Pryor: Verdict and Commitment

Verdict and Commitment for Criminal Case No. 14742: United States vs. John J. Pryor, Defendant. Upon plea of guilty for three counts of income tax fraud, Pryor is sentenced to federal penitentiary for a total of two years with five years probation following. Pryor is also fined a total of $20,000.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. John Jenkins, Edmund B. O'Brien, Pete Wilson Brummet, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14115: United States vs. John Jenkins, Edmund B. O'Brien, "Pete" Wilson Brummet, Dan Wiczkoski, Fred Johnston, Leona M. O'Brien, John F. Green, Elizabeth England, Clara Wilk, and Merle Thompson, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 21st Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 30 votes were shifted from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Johnston, O'Brien, Green, and England were acting as election judges, and Wilk and Thompson served as election clerks.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. John Jenkins, Edmund B. O'Brien, Pete Wilson Brummet, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14115: United States vs. John Jenkins, Edmund B. O'Brien, "Pete" Wilson Brummet, Dan Wiczkoski, Fred Johnston, Leona M. O'Brien, John F. Green, Elizabeth England, Clara Wilk, and Merle Thompson, defendants. Jenkins entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to one year and one day in the penitentiary, suspended for two years probation and a fine of $400. O'Brien entered a plea of nolo contendere was sentenced to three months in jail and a fine of $200. Brummet entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to jail for six months and a fine of $300. Brummet entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to jail for six months and a fine of $300. Wiczkowski entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to three months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $300. Johnston and O'Brien entered pleas of nolo contendere and were sentenced to three months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Bill of Exceptions in Condensed and Narrative Form

Bill of Exceptions in Condensed and Narrative Form for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document provides an account of all exceptions made during the trial testimony.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document charges Lazia with tax evasion. He was suspected to be affiliated with the Kansas City Mafia and the Pendergast Machine.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Memorandum in Support of Motion for Bill of Particulars

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. In this document, Frank P. Walsh, attorney for Lazia, requests greater detail in the illegal activity Lazia is charged with. Walsh requests this information in order to furnish a strong defense for his client.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Order for Capias

Order for Capias for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document orders a writ for arrest of defendant John Lazia and that his "bond be fixed in the sum of $1,500.00." Lazia was suspected of being affiliated with the Kansas City Mafia and the Pendergast Machine.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Order for Subpoena Duces Tecum

Order for subpoena duces tecum for Raymond A. Edlund in Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. This document orders a writ to order Edlund to appear before court and bring a number of selected documents. These requested documents include records of John Lazia's financial transactions at the Merchants Bank of Kansas City, Missouri.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Statement Made by the Court When Imposing Sentences

Statement Made by the Court When Imposing Sentences for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. In this document, the court affirms its belief that the jury was unbiased, despite the large amount of publicity the case received. The court also explains the decisions made when imposing punishment for Lazia's guilty verdict.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John Lazia: Verdict

Verdict for Criminal Case No. 12028: United States vs. John Lazia. In this document, Lazia is found guilty as charged in the indictment.

January 1, 1934
U.S. vs. John P. Lynch, Lillie Current, Jack Cole, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13770: United States vs. John P. Lynch, Lillie Current, Jack Cole, Edna Green, Esther Halbert, and Evelyn Parker, defendants. Cole and Lynch entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced to jail for eight months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $1,000. Current entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for thirty days, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $100. Green entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and received a sentence of two years probation.

U.S. vs. John P. Lynch, Lillie Current, Jack Cole, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13770: United States vs. John P. Lynch, Lillie Current, Jack Cole, Edna Green, Esther Halbert, and Evelyn Parker, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 14th Precinct of the 11th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Almost 60 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Lynch, Current, Cole, and Green were acting as election judges, and Halbert and Evelyn served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. John T. Little, Alice M. Froeschl, James E. Maxey, et al.: Commitments

Commitment in Criminal Case No. 13647: United States vs. John T. Little, Alice M. Foreschl, James E. Maxey, Lena T. Green, Forest C. Holman, Ruth Hogendorn, Joseph Hobdy, and Gilbert Stevens, defendants. The document reports that Maxey entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to serve thirty days in jail. Little was convicted by the jury and sentenced to two years at the U.S. Penitentiary in Leavenworth, Kansas, and was delivered to the warden on April 30, 1938. Holman was convicted by the jury and sentenced to one year and one day at the United States Southwestern Reformatory at El Reno, Oklahoma, and was delivered to the superintendent on May 1, 1938. Stevens was convicted by the jury and sentenced to three years in the U.S. Southwestern Reformatory at El Reno, Oklahoma, and was delivered there on May 1, 1938.

U.S. vs. John T. Little, Alice M. Froeschl, James E. Maxey, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13647: United States vs. John T. Little, Alice M. Foreschl, James E. Maxey, Lena T. Green, Forest C. Holman, Ruth Hogendorn, Joseph Hobdy, and Gilbert Stevens, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 19th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Almost 70 votes votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and a similar number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Little, Froeschl, Maxy, and Green were acting as election judges, and Holman and Hogendorn served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Louis Depasco, Zula Brennar, Florence Klaasen, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13767: United States vs. Louis Depasco, Zula Brennar, Florence Klaasen, Mayme Hogerty, and Rose Brown, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 3rd Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 50 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Depasco, Brennar, Klassen, and W. W. Hoppe were acting as election judges, and Hogerty and Brown served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Louis Depasco, Zula Brennar, Florence Klaasen, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and orders of probation and commitment in Criminal Case No. 13767: United States vs. Louis Depasco, Zula Brennar, Florence Klaasen, Mayme Hogerty, and Rose Brown, defendants. Depasco entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was placed on probation for one year. Brennar and Brown entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced to two months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $100. Klassen and Hogarty entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were placed on probation for two years.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Manny Akers, A. W. Jarman, and Jewell Hartman: Information from Judge Roscoe C. Patterson

Information provided by Judge Roscoe C. Patterson to issue criminal court case No. 8420: United States of America vs. Manny Akers, alias Jim Akers, A. W. Jarman, and Jewell Hartman, Defendants. Patterson states that the defendants attempted to influence the selection of a jury for the case of United States vs. Frank DeMayo, alias "Chee Chee" DeMayo and Robert Carnahan. The defendants are also charged with attempted bribery of jurors D. W. Mathews and J. R. Crenshaw.

January 1, 1928
U.S. vs. Margaret T. Kelley, Cecelia Ditsch, Beulah Walton, Maurine Nelson, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13649: United States vs. Margaret T. Kelley, Cecelia Ditsch, Beulah Walton, Maurine Nelson, Marie Denger, Olga Kegin, Frank Ditsch, and George Neeper, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 26th Precinct of 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Margaret T. Kelley, Cecelia Ditsch, Beulah Walton, Maurine Nelson, et al.: Verdict

Separate verdicts for selected defendants in Criminal Case No. 13649: United States vs. Margaret T. Kelley, Cecelia Ditsch, Beulah Walton, Maurine Nelson, Marie Denger, Olga Kegin, Frank Ditsch, and George Neeper, Defendants. All verdicts are signed by the foreman and are assumed to be guilty.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Mary Goldstein, Dennis Sheedy, Harry Goldberg, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13840: United States vs. Mary Goldstein, Dennis Sheedy, Harry Goldberg, Dick Burus, William D. Gorman, and Harry Rosenberg, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 15th Precinct of the 1st Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 70 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Sheedy, Goldberg, Frank Mulvihill, and Goldstein were acting as election judges, and Gorman and Burus served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Mary Martin, Marion North, Anna G. Holbrook, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13841: United States vs. Mary Martin, Marion North, Anna G. Holbrook, Georgia Hunter, Rolla C. O'Byrne, and Roy North, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 1st Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Seventy votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. North, Martin, O'Byrne, and Alice Brotemarkle were acting as election judges, and Holbrook and Hunter served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Mary Martin, Marion North, Anna G. Holbrook, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13841: United States vs. Mary Martin, Marion North, Anna G. Holbrook, Georgia Hunter, Rolla C. O'Byrne, and Roy North, defendants. Martin and Holbrook entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and were sentenced to jail for three months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $100. Marion North entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and was sentenced to jail for six months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $200. Hunter and O'Byrne entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and were sentenced to two years probation. Roy North entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and was sentenced to jail for eight months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $500.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Matt C. Gill, Janie A. Brown, Ethel G. McLouth, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13944: United States vs. Matt C. Gill, Janie A. Brown, Ethel G. McLouth, Cora Ellen Owells, Mary I. Diehl, Edwin H. Mengell, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 3rd Precinct of the 16th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Seventy votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. North, Martin, O'Byrne, and Alice Brotemarkle were acting as election judges, and Holbrook and Hunter served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Matt C. Gill, Janie A. Brown, Ethel G. McLouth, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13844: United States vs. Matt C. Gill, Janie A. Brown, Ethel G. McLouth, Cora Ellen Owells, Mary I. Diehl, Edwin H. Mengell, defendants. Gill entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to one year in the penitentiary, suspended for three years probation, and a fine of $500. Brown, McLouth, Owells, Mengel, and Diehl entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced to jail for one month, suspended for one year probation, and a fine of $100.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Murray was the Director of Public Works for Kansas City, Missouri, and Missouri Administrator of the Works Progress Administration, and was charged in five counts with income tax evasion for the years 1934-1938. The indictment catalogs his sources of income and taxes paid for those years, as well as the outstanding tax amounts. Income sources include John J. Pryor, a Pendergast-affiliated contractor.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Judgment

Judgment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves' statement addresses the issue of whether certain payments are to be considered gifts, as the defendant claims, or compensation, which would be taxable, says that the deciding factor between the two is the intention of the parties involved, and suggests further inquiry into that question is required. Those payments were made by John J. Pryor, E. L. Schneider, and T. J. Pendergast during the period that Murray served as Kansas City's Director of Public Works and State Director of the Works Progress Administration, a position that possessed the power to grant business to the aforementioned men, and whose business did receive those contracts during the same time period. The statement also argues that Murray earned good salaries from both positions, and that "it would be rare to offer such gifts to a person, not in need, in installments, over so long a time." The judge decides that the payments were not made as gifts, but as "consideration of favors obtained from the defendant in his official capcity and ... intended as compensation," and that it is not credible to believe that the defendant understood them to be otherwise. Given that the payments are understood to be compensation, and that taxes were not paid on that income, Reeves finds the defendant guilty as charged.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Murray was the Director of Public Works for Kansas City, Missouri, and Missouri Administrator of the Works Progress Administration, and was found guilty at trial on charges of tax evasion for the years 1935-1938, and sentenced to two years in the penitentiary for each of five counts, but all to be served concurrently.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Opening Statement of Maurice M. Milligan

U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan's opening statement in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Milligan notes that Murray filed tax returns in each of those years, for considerably less than his actual income, i.e. reporting net income of $3,500.85 in 1935, but actually receiving $14,576.88, and that he defrauded the government out of $6,577.29 in total over those five years. Milligan also argues that his personal financial recordkeeping seemed to intentionally cover up income and expenditures, and that he was secreting cash in a bank safety deposit box. He goes on to detail numerous large cash expenditures of Murray's during those years, including loan repayments, investments, and other transactions totalling tens of thousands of dollars, including with Pendergast-owned companies. The statement also alleges that Murray, as Director of Public Works, broke up contracts for construction work to avoid city rules about bidding out contracts on projects such as Brush Creek sewer improvement and the construction of the Municial Airport, and instead granted that work to Pendergast-controlled companies such as Ready Mixed Concrete.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Matthew S. Murray: Sentencing

Sentencing in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves notes that Murray was a successful man of good reputation, who permitted himself "to be drawn into an atmosphere and an environment of low standards" and "forsook the people it was his duty to faithfully serve." He sentences Murray to two years in a penitentiary "of the type of that at Leavenworth, Kansas" in each of the five counts, but orders that the sentences all run concurrently for a total of two years' imprisonment.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Morris Stephens, Earl B. Winans, Grace B. Clark, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13839: United States vs. Morris Stephens, Earl B. Winans, Grace B. Clark, J. P. Bailey, William J. McMahon, and Leo Gilliam, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 23rd Precinct of the 1st Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 40 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Stephens, Winans, Harry A. King, and Grider Thornberry were acting as election judges, and Clark and Bailey served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Morris Stephens, Earl B. Winans, Grace B. Clark, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13839: United States vs. Morris Stephens, Earl B. Winans, Grace B. Clark, J. P. Bailey, William J. McMahon, and Leo Gilliam, defendants. Stephens entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and was sentenced to jail for six months and a fine of $250. McMahon and Gilliam entered pleas of guilty in count two, the United States having entered nolle prosequi count one, and were sentenced to the penitentiary for one year and one day and a fine of $1,000. Clark entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and received a sentence of two years probation and a fine of $100. Bailey entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and received a sentence of two years probation and a fine of $250.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. P. H. Slattery, M. J. Donahue, J. C. Brossman and James Regan: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13740: United States vs. P. H. Slattery, M. J. Donahue, J. C. Brossman, and James Regan, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 21th Precinct of the 5th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 30 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Rene Mosmer, H. A. Sudermeister, Slattery, and Donahue were acting as election judges, and Brossman and Nettie Moulton served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. P. H. Slattery, M. J. Donahue, J. C. Brossman and James Regan: Judgment and Orders of Probation and Commitment

Judgments and orders of probation and commitment in Criminal Case No. 13740: United States vs. P. H. Slattery, M. J. Donahue, J. C. Brossman, and James Regan, defendants. Slattery entered a plea of nolo contendere and was placed on probation for five years. Donahue and Brossman entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to four months in jail, suspected for two years probation, and a fine of $250. Regan entered a plea of guilty to the second count, the United States having dmissed count one, and was sentenced to three months in jail and a fee of $1,500.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Robert C. Porter, Mary D. McComas, Lloyd W. Vinsant, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13678: United States vs. Robert C. Porter, Mary D. McComas, Lloyd W. Vinsant, Ruby Brannan, Hazel L. Holmes, and Irene E. Vinsant, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 11th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Almost 60 votes votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and a similar number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Porter, McComas, Lloyd Vinsant, and Brannan were acting as election judges, and Holmes and Irene Vinsant served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Robert C. Porter, Mary D. McComas, Lloyd W. Vinsant, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13769: United States vs. Robert C. Porter, Mary D. McComas, Lloyd W. Vinsant, Ruby Brannan, Hazel L. Holmes, Irene E. Vinsant, and George Warren, defendants. Porter entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for three months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $200. McComas, Holmes and Irene Vinsant entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were sentenced to jail for thirty days, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $100. Lloyd Vinsant entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for five months and a fine of $1,000. Brannan entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and received a sentence of two years probation. Warren entered a plea of guilty in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for seven months and a fine of $1,000.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendant is charged with income tax fraud for the calendar years 1935 and 1936. In the first of two counts in this indictment, O'Malley is charged with failing to report $22,500.00 in income "recieved in connection with the compromise and settlement of the Missouri Fire Insurance Rate litigation." As a result, O'Malley failed to pay $2,004.00 in income tax due for the 1935 calendar year.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Judgement and Commitment

Judgement and commitment for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. After his plea of guilty, O'Malley is sentenced to a total of one year and one day in a federal penitentiary, followed by three years of probation. O'Malley is also fined $5000.00. The document then lists the details of the defendant's probation.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Motion for Bill of Particulars

Motion for bill of particulars for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for O'Malley pray the court to furnish details as to "when, where, from whom, in what form and for what consideration defendant is alleged to have received" income from the Missouri Fire Insurance Rate Litigation. They request this information so that they may more adequately prepare a defense for the defendant.

U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Notes Concerning Sentence of Defendant

Considerations for the decision of sentence for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis reviews the sentence that he imposed upon T. J. Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14458, so that Otis may more accurately sentence Robert Emmet O'Malley in the present case. Otis comments that, "I have reason to believe that the Pendergast sentence was one of the heaviest that ever has been imposed in the United States in a case charging an attempt to evade an income tax in which there was a plea of guilty." Otis also compares the Pendergast sentencing with the Al Capone sentence. Finally, Otis discusses O'Malley within the previously established context.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Order and Memorandum

Order detailing O'Malley's probation for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis outlines the details of O'Malley's probation followed by a memorandum that clarifies custody and parole conditions of the defendant.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley: Receipt of Fine Payment

Receipt of fine payment for Criminal Case No. 14459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this document, Clerk A. L. Arnold certifies that the District Court of the United States for the Western District of Missouri has received O'Malley's fine of $5000.00.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Russell Lee Thompson, James G. Gildea, Arthur Carl Perry, William Irwin, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14113: United States vs. Russell Lee Thompson, James G. Gildea, Arthur Carl Perry, William Irwin, alias Bill Irwin, Norman John Nyhuse, alias Norman Nyhus, Clarissa Cox, Ethel Thompson, and Nana May Hunter, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 24th Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Russell Lee Thompson, James G. Gildea, Arthur Carl Perry, William Irwin, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitment of Russell Lee Thompson in Criminal Case No. 14113: United States vs. Russell Lee Thompson, James G. Gildea, Arthur Carl Perry, William Irwin, alias Bill Irwin, Norman John Nyhuse, alias Norman Nyhus, Clarissa Cox, Ethel Thompson, and Nana May Hunter, Defendants. Thompson was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $300.00.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Russell Lee Thompson, James G. Gildea, Arthur Carl Perry, William Irwin, et al.: Recognizance for Appearance

Recognizances for appearance in court for Criminal Case No. 14113: United States vs. Russell Lee Thompson, James G. Gildea, Arthur Carl Perry, William Irwin, alias Bill Irwin, Norman John Nyhuse, alias Norman Nyhus, Clarissa Cox, Ethel Thompson, and Nana May Hunter, Defendants. These documents completed by the defendants attest that they will appear before the court to defend the charges imposed upon them.

U.S. vs. Sadie Murphy, G. W. Ferguson, Isador Ritz, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 14118: United States vs. Sadie Humphrey, G. W. Ferguson, Isador Ritz, L. A. Radcliffe, Rosemary Comiskey, Frank Murray, John Shyne, and Opal Lillis, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 1st Precinct of the 2nd Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Humphrey, Ferguson, Ritz, and Frances McIlrath were acting as election judges, and Comiskey and Radcliffe served as election clerks.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Sadie Murphy, G. W. Ferguson, Isador Ritz, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 14118: United States vs. Sadie Humphrey, G. W. Ferguson, Isador Ritz, L. A. Radcliffe, Rosemary Comiskey, Frank Murray, John Shyne, and Opal Lillis, defendants. Humphrey entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to jail for three months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $500. Ferguson entered a plea of guilty was sentenced to three months in jail and a fine of $500. Ritz and Radcliffe entered pleas of nolo contendere and were placed on probation for one year. Murray entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to six months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $1,000. Shyne entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to two months in jail and a fine of $250. Lillis entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to three months in jail, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $100.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13676: United States vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 28th Precinct of 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco: Judgement and Sentence

Judgement and sentence for Criminal Case No. 13676: United States vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco, Defendants. The document states that Ogden, Middleton, Maher, Campbell, and Depasco were found guilty and that Clark had pleaded nolo contendere ("no contest").

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitments for Marie Ogden, Joseph Maher, and Don Depasco in Criminal Case No. 13676: United States vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco, Defendants, and related cases. Ogden and Maher were sentenced for two years and fined $500.00; Depasco was sentenced for 18 months and fined $500.00.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco: Memorandum on Motion for New Trial

Memorandum on motion for new trial for Criminal Case No. 13676: United States vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco, Defendants. The document provides an intriguing and detailed account of the voting fraud that occurred in the 28th Precinct of the 12th Ward of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri on November 3, 1936. Joseph Maher, known to be the 28th Precinct captain for the Pendergast Machine, claims that "In what I did I had no intention of defrauding any specific person". Since the indictment charged the defendants with defrauding individual citizens, the author of the document motions for a new trail in which charges are brought upon Maher et al. for defrauding any and all citizens.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco: Order

Order for resentencing for Criminal Case No. 13676: United States vs. Samuel J. Clark, Marie Ogden, Myrtle E. Middleton, Joseph Maher, Herbert Campbell, and Don Depasco, Defendants, and related cases. Judge Merrill E. Otis orders the sentences of defendants mentioned therein to be set aside and resentenced so that the fines imposed be paid to the court clerk on July 18, 1938.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Affidavit of Bias and Prejudice

Affidavit of bias and prejudice for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this affidavit, Pendergast claims that Judge Merrill E. Otis has a personal bias and prejudice against the defendant. Since Otis is also a judge in the cases Pendergast has illegal involvement in, Pendergast claims a personal bias.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Affidavit of Bias and Prejudice

Affidavit of bias and prejudice for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this affidavit, Pendergast claims that Judge Merrill E. Otis has a personal bias and prejudice against the defendant. Since Otis is also a judge in the cases Pendergast has illegal involvement in, Pendergast claims a personal bias.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Capias

Capias for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. This capias commands H. L. Dillingham, U.S. Marshal, to arrest the three defendants. Dillingham certifies on the back of the document that he procured Pendergast and O'Malley, but was unable to find McCormack.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Capias

Capias for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. This capias commands H. L. Dillingham, U.S. Marshal, to arrest the three defendants. Dillingham certifies on the back of the document that he procured Pendergast and O'Malley, but was unable to find McCormack.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Certificate of the Clerk

Certificate of the Clerk for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. A. L. Arnold certifies that because of personal bias and prejudice towards defendant T. J. Pendergast, Judge Merrill E. Otis is removed from the case and replaced with Judge Archibald K. Gardner.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Complaint

Complaint for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, Harry C. Blanton, United States Attorney, deposes that McCormack is a fugitive from justice in St. Louis, Missouri. Blanton, "prays that removal proceedings be instituted against said defendant to compel his appearance" in court.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Demurrer of Defendant, R. E. O'Malley

Separate demurrer of defendant, Robert Emmet O'Malley for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for O'Malley outline their objections to the indictment in 14 separate points.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Demurrer of Defendant, T. J. Pendergast

Demurrer of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast outline their objection to the indictment in six separate points.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Demurrer of Defendant, T. J. Pendergast

Demurrer of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast outline their objections to the indictment in five separate points.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with the illegal appropriation of $8,000,000.00 collected from the American Insurance Company and other insurance companies. The time line of this conspiracy is then detailed in "Overt Acts".

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with the illegal appropriation of $8,000,000.00 collected from the American Insurance Company and other insurance companies. The time line of this conspiracy is then detailed in "Overt Acts".

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Memorandum and Order

Memorandum and order on the filing of affidavits of bias and prejudice for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis provides his response to Pendergast's affidavit that Otis has prejudice against the defendant. Otis denies any such prejudice or bias, but acknowledges a loophole that the attorneys of Pendergast used to file the affidavit on the defendant's behalf. As such, Otis is forced to order his replacement Judge Archibald K. Gardner to the case.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Memorandum in Plea of Abatement of Indictment

Memorandum in plea for abatement of indictment for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast submit a request to void the indictment for the reason outlined within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Memorandum Upon Pleas in Abatement

Memorandum for the Honorable A. Lee Wyman, United States Judge, upon pleas in abatement interposed by the above-named defendants in Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, Acting United States Attorney Richard K. Phelps summarizes the pleas of the defendants and then discusses the legality of said pleas.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Motion of A. L. McCormack to Quash Indictment

Motion of A. L. McCormack to quash indictment in Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, McCormack's attorney requests to void the indictment because the alleged acts took place three years before the indictment was returned, thus passing the statue of limitations.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Motion to Quash Petit Jury Panel

Motion of defendant T. J. Pendergast to quash petit jury panel for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast motion to reject the selected jury because of an order that excluded Jackson County residents from being selected. The defendant attorneys' seven reasons to quash said jury are included within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Motion to Quash Petit Jury Panel

Motion of defendant R. E. O'Malley to quash petit jury panel for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for O'Malley motion to reject the selected jury because of an order that excluded Jackson County residents from being selected. The defendant attorneys' seven reasons to quash said jury are included within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Motion to Quash Petit Jury Panel

Two separate motions of defendants T. J. Pendergast and R. E. O'Malley to quash petit jury panel for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In these documents, attorneys for the two defendants motion to reject the selected jury because of an order that excluded Jackson County residents from being selected. The defendant attorneys' seven reasons to quash said jury are included within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Motion to Stay Proceedings

Motion to stay proceedings herein and to continue this case as to the defendant, T. J. Pendergast, for the purpose of permitting this defendant to apply for executive clemency in Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast request the court to delay the case so that the defendant can apply for a pardon on account of his previous penitentiary sentence and payment of fine.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Motion to Stay Proceedings

Motion to stay proceedings herein and to continue this case as to the defendant, T. J. Pendergast, for the purpose of permitting this defendant to apply for executive clemency in Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast request the court to delay the case so that the defendant can apply for a pardon on account of his previous penitentiary sentence and payment of fine.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Order Transferring Case

Order transferring case for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, Albert L. Reeves transfers Case No. 14912 to No. 14937 as both cases have the same defendants and allegations.

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Order upon Plea of Not Guilty

Order upon plea of not guilty Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, the court acknowledges Pendergast's oral plea of not guilty and orders that any :any demurrer to the indictment or motion to quash or other preliminary motion shall be filed" by September 6, 1640.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Plea in Abatement, Plea in Bar, and Motion to Dismiss

Plea in abatement, plea in bar, and motion to dismiss in Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast request the above actions be taken for two reasons as outlined within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Plea in Bar of Defendant, T. J. Pendergast

Plea in bar of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast state that all alleged overt acts included in the indictment occurred more than three years before the return of the indictment. Thus, Pendergast requests "that prosecution under said indictment be barred and that he be, therefore, discharged."

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Plea in Bar, Plea in Abatement, and Motion to Quash the Indictment, et al.

Plea in bar to the indictment, plea in abatement of the indictment, and motion to quash the indictment, and to dismiss the prosecution, on behalf of defendant T. J. Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast request the above actions be taken for seven reasons as outlined within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Recognizances for Appearance

Two Recognizances for appearance in court for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In these documents, Thomas J. Pendergast and Robert Emmet O'Malley assert that he will appear before court to answer for charges of "corruptly obstructing the due administration of justice in the case of the American Insurance Company vs. the Superintendent of Insurance of the State of Missouri."

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Recognizances for Appearance

Two recognizances for appearance in court for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In these two documents, Thomas J. Pendergast and Robert Emmet O'Malley assert that he will appear before court to answer for charges of "interferring with the orderly and lawful functioning of the Judiciary Department."

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Separate Plea in Abatement of Defendant, A. L. McCormack

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, A. L. McCormack for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for McCormack ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Separate Plea in Abatement of Defendant, A. L. McCormack

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, A. L. McCormack for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for McCormack ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Separate Plea in Abatement of Defendant, R. E. O'Malley

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, R. E. O'Malley for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for O'Malley ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Separate Plea in Abatement of Defendant, T. J. Pendergast

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14912: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Separate Plea in Abatement of Defendant, T. J. Pendergast

Separate plea in abatement of defendant, T. J. Pendergast for Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. In this document, attorneys for Pendergast ask the court to remove said defendant from the indictment based upon the evidence provided within.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Subpoena Duces Tecum

Subpoena duces tecum for W. T. Kemper in Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. This document orders W. T. Kemper, Jr. of the Commerce Trust Company, Kansas City, Missouri, to testify in court on November 18, 1940 and to bring as evidence "records as custodian of the impounded insurance premiums under order of the U. S. Court for the Western District of Missouri."

U.S. vs. T. J. Pendergast, R. E. O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack: Subpoena Duces Tecum

Subpoena duces tecum for John J. Campbell in Criminal Case No. 14937: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Robert Emmet O'Malley, and A. L. McCormack, Defendant. This document orders John J. Campbell to testify in court on November 18, 1940 and to bring as evidence "records as manager of the custodian's files of the funds impounded in the Missouri Fire Insurance Rate Litigation."

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Capias

Capias for Thomas J. Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. This capias commands H. L. Dillingham, U.S. Marshal, to arrest Thomas J. Pendergast for income tax fraud. His bond for appearance is $10,000.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Capias

Capias for Thomas J. Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. This capias commands H. L. Dillingham, U.S. Marshal, to arrest Thomas J. Pendergast for income tax fraud. His bond for appearance is $10,000.

U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: From Daniel M. Lyons to Merrill E. Otis

Letter from Pardon Attorney Daniel M. Lyons to Judge Merrill E. Otis concerning Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this letter, Lyons requests Judge Otis's view on the prospect of executive clemency for T. J. Pendergast's remaining parole.

January 1, 1943
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: From Lewis J. Grout to Merrill E. Otis

Letter from Chief U.S. Probation Officer Lewis J. Grout to Judge Merrill E. Otis concerning Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this letter, Grout affirms that despite newspaper reports, T. J. Pendergast has not participated in political activities since his release from prison. These actions would be a violation of Pendergast's parole. During this time, Pendergast was accused of directing Harry Truman's political campaign.

U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: From Merrill E. Otis to Daniel M. Lyons

Letter from Judge Merrill E. Otis to Pardon Attorney Daniel M. Lyons concerning Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this reply, Judge Otis denies Lyon's request for T. J. Pendergast's release from probation, despite letters of support by James M. Kemper, Howard Cook, J. C. Nichols, E. F. Swinney, Herbert M. Woolf, Chester C. Smith, Burris Jenkins, Thomas McGee, A. Sophian, Father Thomas B. McDonald, and B. C. Adams.

January 1, 1943
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendant is charged with income tax fraud for the calendar years 1935 and 1936. Pendergast reported $117,378.41 in gross income in 1936 while the true figure was $356,365.33. His reported gross income figured to only $25,481.11 in income tax due; his actual earnings required him to pay $195,682.15.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this indictment, the defendant is charged with income tax fraud for the calendar years 1935 and 1936. Pendergast reported $117,378.41 in gross income in 1936 while the true figure was $441,115.33. His reported gross income figured to only $25,481.11 in income tax due; his actual earnings required him to pay $255,608.95.

U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitment for Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. After his plea of guilty, Pendergast is sentenced to a total of one year and three months in a federal penitentiary, followed by five years of probation. Pendergast is also fined $10,000.00. The document then lists the details of the defendant's probation.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Memorandum for Publication

Memorandum for Criminal Cases No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant, and No. 14,459: United States vs. Robert Emmet O'Malley, Defendant. In this memorandum, Judge Merrill E. Otis provides insightful, detailed documentation for both cases "for the express purpose of submitting it for publication in the Federal Supplement" as these cases attracted an overwhelming amount of publicity and attracted outrage from machine supporters and from proponents who thought the sentence too lenient. The document profiles both men and their affiliation with other court cases. Judge Otis also addresses the criticism surrounding the Pendergast sentence.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Motion

Motion of defendant, Thomas J. Pendergast, for enlargement of period fixed by conditions of probation within which to pay remaining unpaid interest on tax liabilities in Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Pendergast requests that an additional ninety days be given to pay the U.S. $10,457.12, the remaining interest on his tax liabilities.

January 1, 1941
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Order

Order for Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis orders a copy of the letter from Daniel M. Lyons to Otis and Otis's reply to be filed with the aforementioned case.

January 1, 1943
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Order

Order detailing Pendergast's probation for Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis clarifies custody and parole conditions of the defendant.

U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Order

Order enlarging period fixed by conditions of probation within which to pay remaining unpaid interest on tax liabilities in Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis allows Pendergast an additional ninety days be given to pay the U.S. $10,457.12, the remaining interest on his tax liabilities.

January 1, 1941
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Order and Memorandum Touching Conditions of Probation

Order and memorandum touching conditions of probation for Pendergast in Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. After restating the defendant's sentence, the document provides twelve detailed conditions for Pendergast's probation, one of which effectively bars him from all political activity.

January 1, 1940
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Order for Capias and Bond

Order for capias and bond in Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Judge Merrill E. Otis orders the arrest of Thomas J. Pendergast for income tax fraud. His bond for appearance is $10,000.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Recognizance for Appearance

Recognizance for appearance in court for Criminal Case No. 14458: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Thomas J. Pendergast asserts that he will appear before court on May 7, 1936 to answer for charges of income tax fraud.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. Thomas J. Pendergast: Recognizance for Appearance

Recognizance for appearance in court for Criminal Case No. 14567: United States vs. Thomas J. Pendergast, Defendant. In this document, Thomas J. Pendergast asserts that he will appear before court on May 7, 1936 to answer for charges of income tax fraud.

January 1, 1939
U.S. vs. W. C. Murphy, John L. Gordon, Senna Twist, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13738: United States vs. W. C. Murphy, John L. Gordon, Senna Twist, Alice Tweedy, Ada Bennett, and Ernest N. Orr, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 10th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." More than 80 votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Murphy, Gordon, Tweedy, and Twist were acting as election judges, and Bennett and Ophelia Tennyson served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. W. C. Murphy, John L. Gordon, Senna Twist, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitment in Criminal Case No. 13738: United States vs. W. C. Murphy, John L. Gordon, Senna Twist, Alice Tweedy, Ada Bennett, and Ernest N. Orr, defendants. The documents report that Murphy entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to six months in jail, then suspended for two years probation, and a $1000 fine. Gordon, Senna and Bennett entered a plea of nolo contendere and were sentenced to two years probation. Tweedy entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to two months in jail, then suspected for two years probation, and a $250 fine. Orr entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to seven months in jail and a fine of $1000.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Complaint

Complaint for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. In this document, Thomas J. Layson calls upon the court to charge the defendants with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy. Layson also charges the defendants with ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Final Mittimus

Final Mittimus for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. This document orders the marshal to transport the defendant George L. McGee to prison with a bail of $25,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. The defendants are charged with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy, and ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, et al.: Warrant to Apprehend

Warrant to Apprehend for Criminal Case No. 12126: United States vs. Walter H. McGee, Wendell Johnson, Clarence Stevens, L. R. Gilbert, Hazel Johnson, Lenora Gilbert, Clarence Click, and George McGee, Defendants. This document calls for the arrest of the defendants charged with the kidnapping of Mary McElroy, daughter of Kansas City, Missouri city manager Henry Francis McElroy, and ransoming Mary McElroy for $30,000.00.

January 1, 1933
U.S. vs. Weeden Henderson, Glenn Barnard, Count B. Weeks, Amy Freund, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 13755: United States vs. Weeden Henderson, Glenn Barnard, Count B. Weeks, Amy Freund, Adeline B. Levy, Maude Sprink, and Frank P. Dixon, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 9th Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

U.S. vs. Weeden Henderson, Glenn Barnard, Count B. Weeks, Amy Freund, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgement and commitment/orders for the defendants in Criminal Case No. 13755: United States vs. Weeden Henderson, Glenn Barnard, Count B. Weeks, Amy Freund, Adeline B. Levy, Maude Sprink, and Frank P. Dixon, Defendants. Henderson, Barnard, Freund, Dixon were sentenced from six months to four years in jail and fined $100.00. Weeks, Levy, Sprink were given two years probation.

U.S. vs. William H. Schultz, Mary Gossey, Algo Davis, et al.: Indictment

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13951: United States vs. William H. Schultz, Mary Gossey, Algo Davis, Beverly Bledsoe, Virgil Lee Gibbs, and Anita C. Davis, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 5th Precinct of the 11th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election. The indictment states that votes for the Republican presidential candidate were instead counted for other candidates, and that the defendants knew the count as recorded on tally sheets and other statements was "false, fradulent, untrue and corrupt." Thirty-five votes were shifted from the Landon/Knox presidential ticket to Roosevelt/Garner, and the same number from Paul R. Byrum to C. Jasper Bell in the 4th District Congressional race. Schultz, Gossey, Davis, and Bledsoe were acting as election judges, and Gibbs and Davis served as election clerks.

January 1, 1937
U.S. vs. William H. Schultz, Mary Gossey, Algo Davis, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgments and commitments in Criminal Case No. 13951: United States vs. William H. Schultz, Mary Gossey, Algo Davis, Beverly Bledsoe, Virgil Lee Gibbs, and Anita C. Davis, defendants. Schultz entered a plea of nolo contendere and was sentenced to three months in jail, suspended for two years probation and a fine of $200. Gossey, Bledsoe, Gibbs, and Davis entered pleas of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and were fined $100. Davis entered a plea of nolo contendere in count two, the United States having dismissed count one, and was sentenced to jail for three months, suspended for two years probation, and a fine of $200.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. William Patrick McCormick, Homer Lee Nave, Harry Lee Myers, Viola Edna Tiffany, et al.: Indictment

Indictment for Criminal Case No. 14112: United States vs. William Patrick McCormick, Homer Lee Nave, Harry Lee Myers, Viola Edna Tiffany, Wanda Eleanor Fitzpatrick, Silas Frank Christian, Otis Grace Whitsett, and Helen Brown, alias Helen Woods, Defendants. In this indictment, the defendants are charged with voter fraud during the national election on November 3, 1936. These defendants were in charge of recording votes for the 27th Precinct of the 12th Ward located in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

January 1, 1938
U.S. vs. William Patrick McCormick, Homer Lee Nave, Harry Lee Myers, Viola Edna Tiffany, et al.: Judgment and Commitment

Judgment and commitments for Criminal Case No. 14112: United States vs. William Patrick McCormick, Homer Lee Nave, Harry Lee Myers, Viola Edna Tiffany, Wanda Eleanor Fitzpatrick, Silas Frank Christian, Otis Grace Whitsett, and Helen Brown, alias Helen Woods, Defendants. The defendants were sentenced with three months in prison and/or fined from $100.00 to $200.00. The imprisonment sentence of Myers, Tiffany, Christian, Whitsett, and Brown was immediately suspended and they were put on two years probation.

January 1, 1938