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Streetcar at 15th and Main

Circa 1925 photograph of a streetcar at the intersection of 15th Street (presently Truman Road) and Main Street. This vantage point faces west from the south side of 15th Street, just east of its intersection with Main Street.

Southwest Corner of 11th and Broadway

Photograph of storefronts along the southwest corner of 11th Street and Broadway Boulevard. New Broadway Hotel sign in view as well as entrance to Denver Pharmacy.

President Hotel

Circa 1928 photograph with full frontal and side view of the President Hotel; located on the northeast corner of 14th Street and Baltimore Avenue. A gasoline station called Pen-Jac and a parking lot is also in view.

Muehlebach Field Dedication

Program distributed for the Muehlebach Field dedication on July 3, 1923, including a proclamation by Mayor Frank H. Cromwell recommending that "every employer forget the ever present serious side of life" in order to attend, and let employees attend, the opening game. To set the example, Cromwell declared that day a half-holiday for city employees. The program also notes speeches from George Muehlebach, the governors of Kansas and Missouri,and mayors of Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas. Photographs depict the stadium, the team, and local supporters.

McGee Street South Near 26th

Photograph looking south along McGee Street Trafficway from just north of the 26th Street overpass.

McGee Street South from 22nd

Photograph looking south along McGee Street Trafficway from the intersection of McGee, 22nd Street, and Gillham Road.

Harmony Lunch Restaurant

Photograph of the Harmony Lunch Restaurant, once located at the northwest corner of Grand Avenue (presently Grand Boulevard) and 4th Street. Also pictured is an advertisement for Muehlebach Pilsner Beer.

Future: Vol. II, No. 2

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Future: Vol. II, No. 1

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Future: Vol. I, No. 9

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the crime rate for auto theft and parts stripping in Kansas City compared to Saint Louis and description of its inaccurate measurements by the Kansas City Police Department not accepted by the FBI, with photo of a stripped car and a portrait of J. Edgar Hoover. Other featured articles include: “One Year Ago This Week” (p.

Future: Vol. I, No. 8

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Future: Vol. I, No. 7

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, asserting that it “is well established that there are approximately three thousand persons drawing pay from the city when the work actually is being done by about fifteen hundred,” the impact that has on salaries, and the departments in which the issue is most evident. Other featured articles include: “You May Live Till March, Cabbies” (p.