Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

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George Van Millett

Native Americans on horseback, steamboats at the levee and early frontier characters were some of the first subjects for artist George Van Millett, who spent his life painting the people and scenes of Kansas City.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Postcard showing the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, and Atkins Museum of Fine Art, located between Oak Street and Rockhill Road, south of 45th Street, in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces north towards the museum from just west of Rockhill Road. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Mr. and Mrs. T. H.

Postcard showing the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, located between Oak Street and Rockhill Road, south of 45th Street, in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest towards the museum from just west of Rockhill Road. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Mrs. Newton Hicklin of St Joseph, Missouri.

Postcard showing the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, located between Oak Street and Rockhill Road, south of 45th Street, in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest towards the museum from just west of Rockhill Road. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Elizeth Walker of Parkville, Missouri.

Kansas City Life Insurance Building, 1920

On January 22, 1882, future architect William Drewin Wight was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 1911, he joined his older brother, Thomas, in Kansas City, where they created the architectural firm of Wight & Wight. The firm went on to profoundly influence Kansas City's architectural landscape with prominent designs that included the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Jackson County Courthouse, the Kansas City Life Insurance Company Building, and City Hall.

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