Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Displaying 1 - 12 of 22
Author: 
Susan Robinson

Native Americans on horseback, steamboats at the levee and early frontier characters were some of the first subjects for artist George Van Millett, who spent his life painting the people and scenes of Kansas City.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the mismanagement and financing of garbage removal in Kansas City, rating the city the worst among its other cities of its size for annual garbage production, from statistics garnered by the Civil Research Institute. Other featured articles include: “Only a Bootlegger” (p. 2), biographical article about "Mr.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J. Edgar Hoover," in an article about the crime-fighting operations of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and its relation to Kansas City crime. Sheriff Bash, Chief Coffey, Director Reppert, Chief of Detectives Thomas Higgins, and Lieutenant George Rayen are also discussed. Other featured articles include: “Journey to the K.C.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, asserting that it “is well established that there are approximately three thousand persons drawing pay from the city when the work actually is being done by about fifteen hundred,” the impact that has on salaries, and the departments in which the issue is most evident. Other featured articles include: “You May Live Till March, Cabbies” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Object Type: 
Postcards

Postcard showing the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, and Atkins Museum of Fine Art, located between Oak Street and Rockhill Road, south of 45th Street, in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces north towards the museum from just west of Rockhill Road. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Breimeyer of Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Object Type: 
Postcards

Postcard showing the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, located between Oak Street and Rockhill Road, south of 45th Street, in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest towards the museum from just west of Rockhill Road. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Mrs. Newton Hicklin of St Joseph, Missouri.

Object Type: 
Postcards

Postcard showing the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art, located between Oak Street and Rockhill Road, south of 45th Street, in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces northwest towards the museum from just west of Rockhill Road. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Elizeth Walker of Parkville, Missouri.

Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On January 22, 1882, future architect William Drewin Wight was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In 1911, he joined his older brother, Thomas, in Kansas City, where they created the architectural firm of Wight & Wight. The firm went on to profoundly influence Kansas City's architectural landscape with prominent designs that included the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Jackson County Courthouse, the Kansas City Life Insurance Company Building, and City Hall.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.