Kansas City Blues

Displaying 1 - 11 of 11
Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of the 11th Annual Baseball Day Luncheon given by the South Central Business Association for the Kansas City Blues at the Lucerne Hotel.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of Frankie Frisch, Dizzy Dean, and Daffy Dean with unidentified men and women at podium during South Central Business Association luncheon in the ballplayers' honor at the LaSalle Hotel.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Group portrait of the 1936 Kansas City Blues baseball team inside Muehlebach Field (later renamed Blues/Municipal Stadium). The team is posed in front of an oversized baseball display that reads "George Trautman Official League". Autograph on photo reads "To my pal N. Emerson Paton in appreciation, Phil Small, May 4, 1936, 'Parkview Pharmacy'".

Object Type: 
Ephemera

Program distributed for the Muehlebach Field dedication on July 3, 1923, including a proclamation by Mayor Frank H. Cromwell recommending that "every employer forget the ever present serious side of life" in order to attend, and let employees attend, the opening game. To set the example, Cromwell declared that day a half-holiday for city employees. The program also notes speeches from George Muehlebach, the governors of Kansas and Missouri,and mayors of Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas. Photographs depict the stadium, the team, and local supporters.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the mismanagement and financing of garbage removal in Kansas City, rating the city the worst among its other cities of its size for annual garbage production, from statistics garnered by the Civil Research Institute. Other featured articles include: “Only a Bootlegger” (p. 2), biographical article about "Mr.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and brief history of the Kansas City Municipal Airport (later called the Downtown Airport) "between North Kansas City and Kansas City proper," dedicated in 1927 and opened in 1929 with four airlines and reorganization after "cancellation of government mail contracts" in 1934. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots of the Week” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Author: 
David Conrads

Arguably one of the most overlooked players from the early days of baseball, Johnny Kling, a native of Kansas City, was the game’s premier defensive catcher in the first decade of the 20th century and a key member of the great Chicago Cub teams of 1906 to 1910. Nicknamed “Noisy” for the constant stream of chatter he maintained behind the plate, Kling was admired by teammates and opponents for his ability to defend, handle pitchers and engage in the mental aspects of the game during the “dead-ball era.” Kling returned to Kansas City after his retirement from baseball and pursued a successful career in business, primarily real estate. In 1933 he bought the minor league Kansas City Blues and immediately eliminated segregated seating at Meuhlebach Field, which was also the stadium used by the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues.

Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On October 6, 1922, the Kansas City Monarchs and the Kansas City Blues baseball teams embarked on a six-game series that would end with the Monarchs being crowned "The New City Champions" by the Kansas City Star.

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.