Pendergast, James F.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8
Author: 
Nancy J. Hulston
Jim presented himself as an advocate for the common working man, which enhanced his political base. He helped people find jobs and provided coal and food to the needy. In 1894 Jim’s brother Tom, the youngest of the Pendergast siblings, joined the family business in Kansas City. Jim moved Tom quickly into grassroots politics, teaching him how to get out the vote and how to steal elections.
Object Type: 
Photographs

Portrait photograph of the 1899 Kansas City, Missouri councilmen's baseball team. Pictured on top from left to right: Lewis B. Sawyer, 7th Ward, center field; Jesse L. Jewell, 3rd Ward, second base; O. Hansford Swearingen, 5th Ward, catcher; Claus Swanson, 4th Ward, right field; and John Moran, 2nd Ward, third base. Pictured on bottom from left to right: F. N. Johnson, 14th Ward, pitcher; John P. Lynch, 6th Ward, left field; James Pendergast, 1st Ward, short stop and Captain; A. D. Burrows, 10th Ward, substitute; and F. L. Middleton, 13th Ward, first base.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from U. A. McBride to Sam Hargus, indicating that Tom Pendergast was recommending him for a government position.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Sam Hargus to U. A. McBride recommending that James Pendergast should meet with Governor Guy Park.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Jackson C. Stanton to Governor Lloyd Stark, discussing Tom's ascension to head the Pendergast family and lauding Stark for his work against the Pendergast machine. He writes "by his religious ties, family relationships, political spoils, and political patronage Tom Pendergast and his faction or clique have become about all there is to Kansas City."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Tom Boydston to Guy B. Park about an article in a Massachusetts newspaper about Pendergast's control over Kansas City. He writes "that the real reason that Tom Pendergast has a hold on the people of Kansas City, is that he is a real benefactor, feeds the hungry, clothes the naked, and puts money in the pocket of the down and out fellow." He claims that "we of Platte County origin hate 'Old John Brown'," the abolitionist.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article entitled "King of Kansas City, Emperor of Missouri" about the corrupt activities of Boss Tom Pendergast of Kansas City.

Author: 
Mary Frances Ivey
University of Kansas

Joseph “Joe” Shannon presided over Kansas City’s Northside Democratic Party from the early 20th century to 1930, after which he relocated to Washington, D.C., for a 14-year tenure as a U.S. Congressman. Shannon’s political career was marked by his Jeffersonian Democratic views and his tenuous relationships with brothers James and Tom Pendergast.

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.