Milligan, Jacob L. "Tuck"

Displaying 1 - 12 of 52
Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum containing a statement from an unnamed former member of the Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners and his contacts with Charles Binaggio. He describes efforts by "the Binaggio political group" to remove him from the police board, and a meeting with Binaggio arranged by Herman Rosenberg, wherein Binaggio stated that he felt his group was due patronage and favors due to their support of Governor Smith's election.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Memorandum regarding James M. Pendergast, nephew of Kansas City political boss Tom Pendergast. The document discusses his involvement in the 1948 election of Forest Smith as Missouri governor, with the understanding that Smith would allow crime boss Charles Binaggio to have greater influence over the Kansas City police board of commissioners. There are further descriptions of Binaggio's attempts to take advantage of Pendergast's influence prior to that time, and of election fraud efforts in 1946 and 1947.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Summary of the testimony that Sheridan E. Farrell, manager of the Philips Hotel and former police commissioner, is expected to provide. Farrell denies that "his desire to change the police chief had anything to do with his desire to have an open town," and denies speaking to Kansas City crime boss Charles Binaggio about the police board or having an open town, and asserts that Jacob "Tuck" Milligan recommended Braun for chief of police.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the “lug,” “an involuntary or forced contribution to something a luckless employee isn’t nearly as interested in” as his and his family’s own welfare. Other featured articles include “T. J. and W. T.” (page 2), about patching up of differences between William Kemper, Sr. ("Democratic national committeeman for Missouri") and Tom Pendergast (Democratic No.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the apartments on the Country Club Plaza and Armour Boulevard managed by the Assured Rental Company (led by George Goldman and Herman Shapiro), in the city's "South Side," voting against the Pendergast ticket City Council nominees.

Object Type: 
Essays

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1940 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive describes how Governor Lloyd C. Stark asked for Ralph's support for Stark's senatorial campaign, as Stark had recently appointed Ralph to a General. After Ralph put his support towards the reelection of his cousin Senator Harry S. Truman, Stark attempted to have Ralph's status as General revoked. In response, Ralph, Olive, and Bennett C. Clark resolved to get another Democratic candidate to enter to decrease Stark's chance of nomination.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to Jack Alexander, a St. Louis Post Dispatch writer who had written an article critizing Senator Harry S. Truman entitled "Missouri Dark Mule". Burrus responds to accusations that Truman is a Pendergast "yes-man" and that he won because of voter fraud.

Object Type: 
Essays

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1934 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive details how her and her husband helped Jacob L. Milligan with his campaign before learning that Ralph's cousin Harry S. Truman would enter as well. The two had committed themselves to the Milligan campaign and could not aid Harry. Olive also details tactics used by the Pendergast Organization during this campaign.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Katherine W. Halterman in which he expresses his regret that Pendergast retracted his support for Lozier's U.S. Senate candidacy. He comments that, "the Missouri Democracy will not take Judge Truman's candidacy seriously," and believes that Jacob L. "Tuck" Milligan will win.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 26, 1934. Foree reports on John J. Cochran's political meeting in St. Louis of the previous evening and on Cochran's projected polling in St. Louis. He recounts, "They are claiming 10 to 1 of all the combined votes of [Jacob L.] Milligan and [Harry S.] Truman in the city." Foree also mentions that Cochran recently traveled to Kansas City to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Ralph F. Lozier to Charles M. Howell in which Ralph explains why Charles should drop out of his Senate campaign race so that Ralph may enter with Pendergast's support.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.