Kitchen, William A.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 64
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases. Kitchen then recommends Charlie Carr for the position and asks Truman to pass this recommendation on to Bennett C. Clark and President Roosevelt.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen requests Truman's help in confirming his sister, Elizabeth Kitchen Black, as Postmaster of Mound City, Missouri. Kitchen also requests an autographed portrait of Truman for Kitchen to hang in his office.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman thanks Kitchen for state committee suggestions. In the postscript, Truman writes in longhand: "Can't thank you enough for your help in campaign."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen shares his on Robert Walton's sentiment concerning the Missouri Democratic Party. They believe the party in Missouri looks to Truman to save and reorganize it ahead of the 1942 election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen encourages Truman to give K. E. Long of Newburg, Missouri a job under Mr. Murray. Kitchen finds Long to be "well connected politically in Phelps County and I am, therefore, extremely anxious that he be placed on the payroll at the earliest possible date."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman makes a request of Kitchen. He asks him to talk with General Joe Keenan when Keenan visits Kansas City on May 14, 1938. During this visit, Truman requests Kitchen to mention Fred Canfill as an excellent pick for U.S. Marshall at Kansas City.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen suggests a way in which Truman can put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City. Kitchen proposes that the President could appoint a new attorney of Truman's choosing, but keep Milligan as a special prosecutor for the Kansas City voter fraud cases. By doing so, Truman can control the placement without the Kansas City newspapers accusing him of trying to suppress the prosecution of voter fraud.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman comments on the appointment for a new judge on the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. He states, "I think the longer we wait on this thing the better off we are going to be."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to L. P. Presler in which Kitchen provides a personal recommendation of Harry S. Truman in his re-election campaign for Senator. Kitchen then asks for Presler's (misspelled in the letter) support of Truman as Truman will not have much time to campaign in Missouri before the August 6th primary election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discussing advertising for Truman's 1940 Senate re-election campaign. He informs Truman that he has been preparing campaign literature targeted towards veterans.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman addresses the WPA controversy previously mentioned by Kitchen. He defends his decision in interest of cutting federal expenses where need is no longer as critical. He also addresses other issues that Kitchen believes might hurt the Democratic party in the 1940 election.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.