Higgins, Otto P.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 95
Object Type: 
Photographs

Portrait of Jean Helier posed behind glass filled with bullet holes. Photo is autographed as "To N. Emerson Paton, Kansas City's Livest Business Assn. Secretary from Hean Helier, Secretary to Otto P. Higgins, 5-20-38". Photo is credited to the Kansas City Police Department.

Object Type: 
Clippings
Photographs

Clipping entitled "Detective Who Got Tip" from an article in Kansas City Journal-Post on June 3, 1933 documenting the kidnapping of Mary McElroy. The photograph's caption states, "R. K. Cole, one of the city detectives, who obtained the information leading to the arrest of the alleged kidnapers of Miss Mary McElroy, is shown here standing beside T. J. Higgins, chief of detectives, as he made his report. Inset shows A. H. Kessel, partner of Cole, who worked with him in obtaining the information."

Object Type: 
Periodicals
Cartoons (Commentary)

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article being a reproduction of a St. Louis Post-Dispatch report and editorial on Kansas City corruption and vice. Other articles document exorbitant car insurance premiums in Kansas City, pervasive public gambling and prostitution, and the relationship between Tom Pendergast and John Lazia.

Poster Image: 
Object Type: 
Narratives

Extant excerpt of a KMBC special radio broadcast: Three Kansas City police reporters talk about their work, about Kansas City crime, and share their on-the-job stories. Discussion of Frank Nash, Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd, and Otto Higgins are included.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 4 and 8, about the "anti-machine speech" by Missouri state representative J. A. Gray broadcast "over station WOS in Jefferson City," Missouri, cut off in mid-transmission after scathing indictments of Tom Pendergast, with a copy of the speech in full. Other featured articles include: “Lunch-hooks Out of the Cookie Jar” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

First issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a statement on the newspaper's objective, maintaining that the newspaper is not against any certain political party or vice, but that it is simply for "good government". Featured articles include: “Council Passes Cab Ordinance” (pp. 2 & 4) discussing councilman Frank H. Backstrom’s reaction to the ordinance and detailing other ordinances appropriating bond funds.; "Adult Education--A Fine Work" (pp.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and brief history of the Kansas City Municipal Airport (later called the Downtown Airport) "between North Kansas City and Kansas City proper," dedicated in 1927 and opened in 1929 with four airlines and reorganization after "cancellation of government mail contracts" in 1934. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots of the Week” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the crime rate for auto theft and parts stripping in Kansas City compared to Saint Louis and description of its inaccurate measurements by the Kansas City Police Department not accepted by the FBI, with photo of a stripped car and a portrait of J. Edgar Hoover. Other featured articles include: “One Year Ago This Week” (p.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.