Douglas, James

Displaying 1 - 12 of 63
Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Bonham E. Freeman to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that Billings supporters were intending to make a last minute campaign push in Pike County "in order to discredit you in your own county," and describes the opinions of some locals "that the party is being injured by your disagreement with Pendergast."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Frank K. Ashby to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting that Stark (and Judge James Douglas) do not have the support of a Pendergast-allied group in his county. Ashby suggests that if Stark "can shift the positions or take away the appointments of some of the men you know are not for you, or anything you want, you will make it much easier to control this section almost solidly."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Walker C. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, lauding Stark for his "stand for RIGHT in the State of M[issouri]." He writes that many of his county opposed Stark due to his Pendergast support, but that now "most of them are behind you on this [war] to rid the State of the rascals in elections." He also describes losing his job due to political affiliation.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from W. F. Enright to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing support for James Douglas's Missouri Supreme Court campaign in Buchanan County. Enright suggests Stark and Douglas "could arrive at noon or shortly after in order that we might have our parade through the downtown district during the noon hour," as well as other events with supporters.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from John T. Harding to L. H. Forman, discussing anti-Clark/Douglas circulars being "thrown into the river" in St. Louis.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Chas. P. Johnson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing voter registration, Stark's proposed investigation into the Public Works Administration, clean elections, and the support he is organizing for Judge James Douglas. He is particularly concerned about the lack of rigor in cleaning up voter registrations in St. Louis, and the lack of public confidence that their votes will be secret.

Genre: 
Ephemera
Leaflets
Miscellaneous Documents

Campaign materials for James M. Douglas in his candidacy for Missouri Supreme Court. It describes his military service, education, and work as a lawyer and judge, and quotes the Independence Examiner as the "Kind of a Man Missouri Should Be Proud to Have."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Chas. H. Green to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, inquiring as to how his family can support James Douglas' Missouri Supreme Court campaign in St. Clair County. Green describes himself as a Republican of long standing, but that he admires "honesty in politics as well as business, and we admire a Governor that has the courage of his convictions."

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter signed "A friend" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing specific incidents of fraud in the 1938 primary election.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to the headquarters of James Douglas' campaign for Missouri Supreme Court, asking them to look into whether Anna Watson of Marceline is working for the Billings campaign, as she said she was obligated to Tom Pendergast.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. N. Burroughs to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, commending Stark's opposition to "the corrupt elements in our party headed by the Pendergast machine," and believes he will receive support for Judge James Douglas's election to the Missouri Supreme Court.

Genre: 
Correspondence

Letter from G. E. Happy to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, reporting an overheard conversation in Richmond about Pendergast campaign activities, and offering to work for James Douglas's Missouri Supreme Court campaign, "and if not would be glad to distribute his literature in Richmond free of charges."

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.