Ready Mixed Concrete Company

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Object Type: 
Clippings
Cartoons (Commentary)

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on February 1, 1931 showing city hall employees with free passes getting onto a street car driven by Henry F. McElroy. A "Ready Mixed" cart is being pulled behind the street car.

Object Type: 
Clippings
Cartoons (Commentary)

Clipping from the Kansas City Star on April 23, 1931 showing three men (presumably Tom Pendergast, Cas Welch, and Joe Shannon) taking a joy ride while a young boy holds a sign stating, "We have no money for playground supervision."

Object Type: 
Leaflets
Photographs
Cartoons (Commentary)

Unknown Republican publication without volume or issue identification with excerpts from several St. Louis newspapers about the corrupting influence of Tom Pendergast in Kansas City, including the accusation that he chose the Democratic nominee for Governor. Crimes committed by Johnny Lazia and others are also described. The last page is titled "Pendergast Gang is Strictly 'Business'" [this portion could not be scanned due to adhesive].

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a notice that Future’s publishers plan to temporarily suspend publication to reorganize the paper, and also note that “youth is interested and youth is organizing,” and “FUTURE is their paper.” Other featured articles include: “Why Charge a Cover?” (p.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Agreement between R. P. Lyons, vice president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and the United States Board of Parole, stating that Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, will be employed "steadily in the occupation of President" of Ready Mixed Concrete upon his parole, and agreeing to report to U.S. Probation Officer Lewis Grout should Pendergast's work become unsatisfactory. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Object Type: 
Transcriptions

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Application for parole made by Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, for which he became eligible on October 28, 1939. He states that his plans upon release will be to return to his home to reside with his wife and family, and to return to work as president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company. In support of his application, he notes that this conviction was his first offense, and also notes that he is "constantly in need of Medical Attention." He lists James Kemper and R. P. Lyons as his parole advisor and employer, respectively.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Monthly supervision reports, conducted by Lewis J. Grout, Probation Officer, for Tom Pendergast upon his release from the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth. The reports for the months of July, August, and September, include his residence, his return to work as president of Ready-Mixed Concrete, his wages and expenses, and other remarks. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Judgment in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Judge Albert L. Reeves' statement addresses the issue of whether certain payments are to be considered gifts, as the defendant claims, or compensation, which would be taxable, says that the deciding factor between the two is the intention of the parties involved, and suggests further inquiry into that question is required. Those payments were made by John J. Pryor, E. L. Schneider, and T. J.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan's opening statement in Criminal Case No. 14652: United States vs. Matthew S. Murray, defendant. Milligan notes that Murray filed tax returns in each of those years, for considerably less than his actual income, i.e. reporting net income of $3,500.85 in 1935, but actually receiving $14,576.88, and that he defrauded the government out of $6,577.29 in total over those five years.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

A letter from Ready Mixed Concrete Company Vice President R. P. Lyons to Senator Harry S. Truman. Lyons informs Truman that Independence Republican Lyle Weeks was awarded a contracting job by Kansas City and requests that Truman suggest to Weeks to use Ready Mixed Concrete Company concrete for the job. The Ready Mixed Concrete Company was closely associated with the Pendergast Machine.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

A letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Ready Mixed Concrete Company Vice President R. P. Lyons. After being informed that Independence Republican Lyle Weeks was awarded a contracting job by Kansas City, Truman provides a critical opinion of Weeks. However, Truman comments, "if you think it would help for me to say a word for you I will be please of course to do it." The Ready Mixed Concrete Company was closely associated with the Pendergast Machine.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.