NAACP

Displaying 1 - 12 of 13
Author: 
Megan Dennis
University of Kansas

“The black schools [in Kansas City] were much better than they had any right to be, partly because they were full of talented teachers who would have been teaching in college had they been white, and partly because Negro parents and children simply refused to be licked by segregation.” Then-reporter Roy Wilkins’s statement about education in the Kansas City area aptly summarizes the unjust obstacles that segregation created for black students, their parents, and educators at the segregated schools of Kansas City.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from William S. Hogsett to University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada, noting that the university's graduate journalism program is to be reinstated, and addressing questions about Lucile Bluford potentially renewing her application and filing another lawsuit. Hogsett suggests they return to their prior successful argument that her applications are not being made in good faith and are instead "a mere pretense." He believes it likely that the NAACP would select another plaintiff for future efforts.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Missouri Supreme Court opinion written by Judge Albert M. Clark in the appeal of State of Missouri, at the Relation of Lucile Bluford vs. S. W. Canada, Registrar of the University of Missouri, Case No. 37449. Bluford's appeal was based on the United States Supreme Court decision in the Lloyd Gaines vs. University of Missouri case, which asserted that Gaines was entitled to admission to MU's law school when proposed alternatives were insufficient and thus refusing him admission constituted a violation of his right to equal protection.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Sidney R. Redmond, an NAACP attorney, to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, inquiring after what action the university's Board of Curators took regarding Lucile Bluford's application to enter the School of Journalism. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to attorney Nick Cave, forwarding him a copy of the letter from Sidney Redmond, and noting that the issue of Lucile Bluford's application to the university did not come before the Board of Curators. Middlebush also requests advice as to how to reply to Redmond's inquiry. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Memo from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to university president F. A. Middlebush, forwarding a copy of a letter from and reply to Lucile Bluford, which he writes that he has also forwarded to attorney Nick Cave. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to William S. Hogsett, forwarding a copy of a letter from NAACP attorney Sidney Redmond, and mentioning that Lucile Bluford's application to the university did not come before the Board of Curators. He requests Hogsett's advice in how to reply to Redmond's letter. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from attorney Nick T. Cave to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, regarding NAACP attorney Sidney Redmond's inquire about the status of Lucile Bluford's application to the university. He writes to concur with Jack Murray's suggested reply, and to reiterate that Bluford has knowledge of her correspondence, rejected her admission, with registrar S. W. Canada. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to NAACP attorney Sidney R. Redmond, reporting that Lucile Bluford's application never came before the university's Board of Curators, which can be proven in the minutes of the meeting, and noting that "under existing laws of this State," Bluford should apply to Lincoln University. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Brief written by attorneys representing the University of Missouri and it's registrar, S. W. Canada, in Lucile Bluford's appeal in her suit attempting to gain admission to the university's graduate journalism program.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from the president, secretary, and chairman of the executive board of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen. The NAACP thanked Governor Paulen for not passing Senate Bill 269 known as the Ku Klux Klan bill. If passed, this bill would have allowed organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan to operate in Kansas without taking out a charter. Governor Paulen disagreed with the bill and discouraged its passing. The bill failed in the Kansas House of Representatives with 65 nays and 57 yeas.

Author: 
Jason Roe
Kansas City Public Library

On August 30, 1901, Roy Wilkins was born in St. Louis, Missouri. From a modest background, Wilkins would go on to graduate from the University of Minnesota, become the editor of The Call newspaper, and lead the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for more than two decades at the height of the civil rights movement.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.