Ku Klux Klan

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9
Object Type: 
Photographs

People in Klan costume posing with a Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad car. The railroad was one of the largest employers of KCK Klan members during the 1920s.

Object Type: 
Transcriptions

Proceedings of the Second Imperial Klonvokation of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, held at the Convention Hall in Kansas City, MO in September 1924. Several names of klansmen were redacted in this publication of the proceedings, including ones from Kansas City. Notable named speakers include George C. McCarron, Grand Dragon and Governor Clifford Walker of Georgia.

Object Type: 
Transcriptions

Interview with Francisco Ruiz, Millie Rivera, Mike Sanchez, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Amayo, Carmen Ayala and others by Robert Oppenheimer as part of a project to document the history of the Kansas City, Kansas, Hispanic community. Among the topics discussed are the local Mexican community working for the railroads, on farms, and for the meatpacking companies between the two world wars, unionization efforts, and the movement of workers and their families around the Midwest.

Object Type: 
Pamphlets

A special bulletin by William M. Campbell, Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, providing his opinion on Alfred Emanuel "Al" Smith, the 1928 Democratic U.S. presidential candidate. Campbell opposes Smith on the grounds that Smith is an Irish, Catholic, and supports the repeal of Prohibition. Campbell proclaims, "Out of this new second generation of cults, with their gay philosophy and their continental Sabbaths, with their belief in authority for conduct in the church, rather than in the state, come Smith and his kind."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from W. R. Reavis to Lloyd C. Stark. Reavis writes that Pendergast's support is a good goal, but that he believes Stark's candidacy could still be successful without that endorsement. He writes that "to allow [the machine] to continue to dominate the party outstate is inviting disaster," and that "a smart man in the governor's chair could circumscribe their activities without alienating their support and cooperation."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from R. P. Spencer to Lloyd C. Stark regarding a Democratic picnic in Arrow Rock and a rumor that Stark had been affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from W. B. Fahy of Monroe City, Missouri to gubernatorial candidate francis Wilson, describing the tactics of his opponent in Shelby County.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from R. P. Spencer to Lloyd C. Clark discussing campaign logistics and courtesies and how various state politicians feel about his candidacy. He also discusses campaigning in Arrow Rock and Jefferson City, and warns that "a faction in St. Louis, friends of Igoe, and ... of Mayor Dickmann, wish to throw their support to some candidate, other than the one supported by Pendergast."

Author: 
Timothy Rives
Dwight Eisenhower Presidential Library

Like a prairie fire, a revived Ku Klux Klan (KKK) spread quickly across the nation in the 1920s, enrolling upwards of six million white, native-born Protestants into its ranks. Promoting “100 Percent Americanism,” “Protestantism,” “Law and Order,” and the “eternal maintenance of white supremacy,” the Klan found keen reception in quarters where the white majority population felt threatened by immigration, modernization, and illegal alcohol consumption.

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.