Muehlebach Field

Displaying 1 - 12 of 14
Object Type: 
Photographs

Group portrait of the 1936 Kansas City Blues baseball team inside Muehlebach Field (later renamed Blues/Municipal Stadium). The team is posed in front of an oversized baseball display that reads "George Trautman Official League". Autograph on photo reads "To my pal N. Emerson Paton in appreciation, Phil Small, May 4, 1936, 'Parkview Pharmacy'".

Object Type: 
Ephemera

Program distributed for the Muehlebach Field dedication on July 3, 1923, including a proclamation by Mayor Frank H. Cromwell recommending that "every employer forget the ever present serious side of life" in order to attend, and let employees attend, the opening game. To set the example, Cromwell declared that day a half-holiday for city employees. The program also notes speeches from George Muehlebach, the governors of Kansas and Missouri,and mayors of Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas. Photographs depict the stadium, the team, and local supporters.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Panoramic photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs, including L-R: Jack Marshall (P), Hurley McNair (OF/P) , Newt Joseph (3B), Harold 'Yellowhorse' Morris (P), Heavy Johnson (OF), Newt Allen (1B/SS), 'Bullet Joe' Rogan (P), Jose Mendez (P), Dobie Moore (SS), Lemuel Hawkins (1B), William Bell (P), C. Bell, Dink Mothel (UT), Frank Duncan (C), Bill Drake (P), George Sweatt (CF), and Howard Bartlett (P).

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of a nightime baseball game at Muehlebach Field at the northwest corner of 22nd Street and Brooklyn Avenue.

Object Type: 
Postcards

Postcard showing Muehlebach Field (later Ruppert/Blues/Municipal Stadium), once located west of Brooklyn Avenue between 21st and 22nd Street in Kansas City, Missouri. This vantage point faces east-southeast towards the bases and right field. The back of the postcard includes a short letter to Anna Dyer of Boston, Massachusetts.

Author: 
David Conrads

Arguably one of the most overlooked players from the early days of baseball, Johnny Kling, a native of Kansas City, was the game’s premier defensive catcher in the first decade of the 20th century and a key member of the great Chicago Cub teams of 1906 to 1910. Nicknamed “Noisy” for the constant stream of chatter he maintained behind the plate, Kling was admired by teammates and opponents for his ability to defend, handle pitchers and engage in the mental aspects of the game during the “dead-ball era.” Kling returned to Kansas City after his retirement from baseball and pursued a successful career in business, primarily real estate. In 1933 he bought the minor league Kansas City Blues and immediately eliminated segregated seating at Meuhlebach Field, which was also the stadium used by the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of L. D. Livingston of the Kansas City Monarchs. The photo appears to be autographed "To Vessa From a Friend, L. D. Livingston." Vessa is likely VeEssa Spivey of Black Hawk Barbecue.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of an audience watching a baseball game at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.