Binaggio, Dominick

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Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter, labeled "confidential," from an unknown correspondent to Mr. Halley, regarding information received from Kansas City crime boss Charles Binaggio's brother, Dominick. Tim Moran, a "big time gambler here under ... both Prendergasts [sic]," is reported to have instructed Charles Binaggio to support a Pendergast candidate in exchange for sparing numerous men in Binaggio's inner circle from income tax fraud indictments.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about crime in Kansas City, the lack of accurate, trustworthy records about its frequency and location, and the city’s “inefficient, politically-controlled police department.” Other featured articles include: “Mister Welching” (p.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from George H. White to U.S. Attorney Sam Wear regarding an investigation into Carl Carramusa. Carramusa is accused of being a representative of the Kansas City Narcotic Syndicate, a subsidiary of the Kansas City Mafia. The letter provides a history of Impostato's entry into Kansas City organized crime through John Lazia after arriving from Chicago in 1929, and connects the Kansas City narcotics trade with St. Louis, Tampa, Havana, and other cities.

Object Type: 
Periodicals

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Information in the trial of Criminal Case No. 7677: United States vs. Dominick Binaggia, defendant. The document states that, per the affidavit of John J. McGowan (Exhibit A), Federal Prohibition Agent, Binaggia possessed and sold one half pint of whiskey, and maintained a "common nuisance" at 1642 St. Louis Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri,where "intoxicating liquors ... were kept, sold, and bartered" in violation of the Prohibition Act.

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.