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Circa 1930 photograph with an aerial view, looking east, of Fairfax Industrial and Municipal airports.

Circa 1930 photograph with an aerial view of downtown Kansas City looking northwest, taken over near 15th Street and Grand Avenue. Shows Missouri River, Municipal Airport, 2nd Hannibal Bridge, and ASB Bridge.

Photograph of Eleanor Beach, daughter of Kansas City Mayor Albert I. Beach, and Henry McElroy, Jr., and other unidentified people on a raised platform for the christening of "The Kansas City", a Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT) Ford Tri-Motor airplane. TAT merged with Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA) the following year.

Date: 
June 22nd 1929

Photograph of Eleanor Beach, daughter of Kansas City Mayor Albert I. Beach, and Henry McElroy, Jr., and other unidentified people gathered for the christening of "The Kansas City", a Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT) Ford Tri-Motor airplane. Men are seen refueling the airplane. TAT merged with Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA) the following year.

Date: 
June 22nd 1929

KMBC reporter, Paul Henning (who later went to Hollywood and produced Petticoat Junction and The Beverly Hillbillies) interviewing Bernice Claire; flanked by Ruth Warrick and Dick Berger at the Downtown Airport in Kansas City, Mo.

Date: 
1937

Photograph of Henry F. McElroy and Mary McElroy alighting from a TWA airplane. The caption on the back of the image reads, "KC 217231... (Chicago Bureau), MARY McELROY RETURNS HOME. City Manager H. F. McElroy of Kansas City, Mo., and his daughter, Miss Mary McElroy, leaving the plane that brought the girl home from Normal, Ill., where she was taken from a bus after fleeing home. She said she had been worried by letters and phoned threats sent her because of her testimony against the gang that had kidnaped her for $30,000 ransom in May, 1933.

Date: 
February 12th 1935

Clipping entitled "Group, Held in McElroy Kidnaping, Makes Bedraggled Return" in Kansas City Journal-Post on June 3, 1933 showing the kidnappers of Mary McElroy that escaped to Amarillo, Texas before being caught. The caption states, "The group arrested in Amarillo, Tex., in connection with the McElroy kidnaping appeared anything but happy when they got out of the plan at municipal airport. Left to right they are Walter H. McGee, leader of the gang; Mrs. Wendell Johnson, Wendell Johnson, Mrs. L. R. Gilbert and L. R. Gilbert. All were dressed in new clothes.

Date: 
June 3rd 1933

Photograph of Lou Holland, Conrad Mann and other unidentified people at the Municipal Airport dedication.

Date: 
August 17th 1927

Photograph of Aviator Art Goebel and another man standing outside of the Art Goebel School of Flying at Municipal Airport.

Circa 1930 photograph with an aerial view looking northwest toward downtown Kansas City taken over near 18th and Harrison streets. Shows the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, Municipal Airport, and Fairfax area.

Photograph of a Douglas Commercial DC-1 airplane flying north over the Missouri River. This vantage point faces west-southwest with the Hannibal Bridge and the West Bottoms (top-background) pictured.

Advertisement for the Transcontinental & Western Air coast to coast route called "The Lindbergh Line". The route took 48 hours to get from New York City to Los Angeles and used railroads at night and air travel by day.

Form letter from Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc. President Richard W. Robbins to his employees in which he announces that all personnel will be furloughed in ten days.

Date: 
February 18th 1934

Clipping entitled "Police Head Thanks Pilot" from an article in Kansas City Journal-Post on June 3, 1933 documenting the kidnapping of Mary McElroy. The photograph's caption states, "Howard, E. Hall, pilot of the T. & W. A. [Transcontinental & Western Air] plane that brought back the McElroy kidnapers, was congratulated by E. C. Reppert, director of police, when he arrived at the airport. The picture shows R. E. Vetterli, chief agent, department of justice; James O’Neil, secretary to the chief of police; Mr. Reppert, Howard E.

Date: 
June 3rd 1933

Map of a stretch of the Missouri River from Quindaro Bend and the Fairfax Drainage District to the East Bottoms Bend. Shows all principal topographic features for a minimum distance of 2000 feet inland, indicating levees, jetties, creeks, and railroad lines. Goose Island, the Kansas River, Kaw Point, Kansas City, Kansas, Harlem, North Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, are in evidence. Title of the map is described as "Missouri River, mouth to Kansas City (Mile 385.0 to Mile 397.8), revision from airplane photographs July 15, Aug. 21, 1924."

Date: 
1924

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the election frauds in Kansas City government, with a photo of fraudulent signatures in a precinct book and a photo of Gil Bourk, promoter of "permanent registration." Other featured articles include: “Missouri Valley Authority” (p. 2), about a proposed Missouri analog of the New Deal Tennessee Valley Authority; “Better Driving” (p.

Date: 
February 1st 1935

An excerpt of John Q. Adams's doctoral thesis about the physical and cultural characteristics of the North Kansas City Urban District. Adams characterizes the district both as a unit and in relation to Kansas City, Missouri across the river. He concludes his study with a discussion of the implications for future changes in the landscape. The article presents maps and photos of the geographic features of North Kansas City as well as tables pertinent to land usage and industrial development.

Date: 
1930

Riverside Jockey Club 6th Day official program listing details of the day's eight races, including horse owners, trainers, and jockeys.

Date: 
June 2nd 1933
1928 Republican National Convention
Author: 
Dustin Gann

According to a May 29, 1928, editorial in the Kansas Citian , the Republican National Convention promised to “bring more influential people in industry, business, and financial circles than ever brought here by a convention.” Local leaders envisioned the 1928 Republican National Convention raising the national and regional profile of Kansas City in two related ways. First, delegates and visitors attending the convention could see the city’s growth in person. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the event and subsequent attention would bolster the city’s standing, particularly in relation to regional rivals such as Cleveland and St. Louis.

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.