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L.P. Cookingham
Author: 
Barbara Magerl

In the early, post- Pendergast period in Kansas City government, selection of the city's first professional city manager was critical. The special person chosen, L.P. "Perry" Cookingham, became the "czar of Kansas City." Born in Chicago, Cookingham had worked his way up from being a railroad surveyor in Illinois to being president of the International City Managers Association. A Reader's Digest article about him led to his being chosen from 50 candidates for the job in Kansas City.

Our Lady of Sorrows Church
Author: 
Dory DeAngelo

From the mid-1930s until the 1960s, hundreds of Kansas City Catholics saw Dante Cosentino’s paintings of angels and saints each Sunday. Cosentino was an ecclesiastic artist who adorned the interior walls of these churches with his frescos.

Joan Crawford
Author: 
Dory DeAngelo

Joan Crawford , often called Hollywood’s most durable star, was born Lucille LaSueur to divorced parents in 1908 in San Antonio, Texas. When her mother married Henry Cassin, she was renamed Billie Cassin. Around 1917 her family moved to Kansas City, where Billie attended Scarritt Elementary School before she enrolled in St. Agnes Academy as a work student.

Nelson Crews
Author: 
Daniel Coleman

Vocal in print and at the podium, publisher Nelson Crews purchased the Kansas City Sun newspaper and trumpeted a message of advancement. Its reporters covered every aspect of the Kansas City African American community and integrated an organization previously closed to African American workers. Meanwhile his brother James established one of Kansas City’s most important African American institutions, the YMCA at 1824 Paseo .

Crttenton Home
Author: 
Jason Roe

Elizabeth Bruce Crogman, who in 1925 became founder of Kansas City’s Florence Home for Colored Girls to house unwed African American women who were pregnant, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on May 1, 1894. The home functioned as the counterpart to similar organizations that served the area's white residents but denied care to young black women.

Wheatley-Provident Hospital Auxiliary
Author: 
David Conrads

Minnie Lee Crosthwaite filled many roles during her 90 years: teacher, wife, mother, business woman, and community leader. She is remembered best as a pioneering social worker at Wheatley-Provident Hospital, a private hospital with African American staff and patients.

Author: 
Megan Dennis

“The black schools [in Kansas City] were much better than they had any right to be, partly because they were full of talented teachers who would have been teaching in college had they been white, and partly because Negro parents and children simply refused to be licked by segregation.” Then-reporter Roy Wilkins’s statement about education in the Kansas City area aptly summarizes the unjust obstacles that segregation created for black students, their parents, and educators at the segregated schools of Kansas City.

Promotional pamphlet from the Curtiss-Wright Flying school. The pamphlet gives detailed descriptions of the standard courses and methods of instruction and gives more detailed information regarding the commercial pilot's course, the transport pilot's course, the seaplane pilot's course, a listing of all the flying service bases, the Curtiss-Wright Base of Kansas City, and financial planning for students.

Date: 
August 1930

Reprint of a J.C. Nichols article regarding a new subdivision opening in Kansas City. He gives an account of the struggles and successes of the development of this new subdivision and as a real-estate agent. Nichols relates his experiences working with sellers and buyers to provide the best possible home investments and the struggles of the housing market.

Date: 
1923

The Officers of the Society the Society for Suppression of Commercialized Vice's platform against vice and prostitution. The article covers the clean-up efforts taken to counter vice and how law enforcement is cracking down on all law violators. Document contains a reprint of a letter and the text of the Abatement Act. The article concludes with the attempts of the Society to push the Abatement Act into law.

Date: 
April 15th 1921

The University School of Christianity presents "The Growth of Unity," an address Lowell Fillmore gave in July, 1923, at the Unity Conference and Healing Revival. Fillmore recounts  the hardships he experienced growing and the Christian influence his parents had on him.

Date: 
1924

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article covering the issue of women serving on juries. Mary Miller, a prominent businesswoman and member of the Woman's Chamber of Commerce of Kansas City, presents her argument in favor of women serving on juries. Other articles cover defending the building of skyscrapers to reduce traffic congestion and automobile smog. There are additional articles about legislative attempts to reduce crime, public vice, authority in government, and current finances of the Kansas City school district.

Date: 
March 5th 1927
Inaugural Address of Hon. Bryce B. Smith

Inaugural address of Bryce B. Smith, mayor of Kansas City, Missouri delivered on April 10, 1930 in the Council Chamber of City Hall. Smith addresses the current challenges of corruption and how his administration will regain the trust of the public through his political agenda. Smith encourages a community-wide effort through cooperation among public officials to best serve the public.

Date: 
April 10th 1930

An autochrome photograph of Leslie T. Martin's house, tower, and garden on Briarcliff between present-day Route 9 and North Briarcliff Road. Martin was president of Martin Printing Company.

Date: 
May 10th 1939

An autochrome photograph of Leslie T. Martin's house and tower on Briarcliff between present-day Route 9 and North Briarcliff Road. Martin was president of Martin Printing Company.

Date: 
May 10th 1939

Circa 1920 photograph with aerial view of New Richards Field which soon became known as Municipal Airport. Hannibal Bridge is pictured in the background.

Photograph of men standing around a Nicolas-Beazley NB-3P monoplane at Municipal Airport. The airplane, reg. #9314, was produced by the Nicholas-Beazley Airplane Company of Marshall, Missouri.

Photograph of one Fokker F.32 airplane (left) and three Ford Tri-Motor airplanes (right) displayed for a large crowd of several thousand at Municipal Airport, April 4, 1930. This F.32, NC334N, was one of two owned by Western Air Express, and shows "Fox Flying House Party, Western Air Express, New York to Hollywood" on the fuselage. Mary McElroy among others left on this 32-passenger airplane the next day. The Ford Tri-Motor airplanes were owned by Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT) - Maddux Air Lines, which merged with Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA) that year.

Date: 
April 4th 1930

Photograph of three Douglas DC-2 airplanes parked outside of the Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc. airplane hangar at the Municipal Airport. This vantage point faces southeast towards the Hannibal Bridge and downtown Kansas City in the background.

Photograph with view of the terminal building at Municipal Airport, looking toward the southeast with the Kansas City skyline in the background. There are TWA airplanes on the ground and the Transcontinental & Western Air, Inc. (TWA) airport hanger building is in view.

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.