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Letter from Independence, Missouri resident Louise Sheldon to Senator Harry S. Truman. Sheldon informs Truman that the Kansas City Star is attacking the reputation of Judge Marion D. Waltner of the Independence Division of the Circuit Court, labeling him "a Pendergast man." Sheldon then defends Waltner's reputation.

Date: 
December 2nd 1942

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Independence, Missouri resident Louise Sheldon. After Sheldon informs Truman that the Kansas City Star is attacking the reputation of Judge Marion D. Waltner of the Independence Division of the Circuit Court, Truman replies that little can be done to help Waltner in this situation.

Date: 
December 15th 1942

Letter from Democrat Albert R. Norton to Senator Harry S. Truman. Norton reintroduces himself as a former Pendergast ("goat") precinct captain in the 14th Ward in Kansas City, Missouri. He states that he could no longer be proud of such affiliation and became a United Democratic Club precinct captain. Norton then inquires about the possibility of a job in city administration as he had just recently been fired from a Republican office because of his political affiliation.

Date: 
May 12th 1942

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to former Pendergast precinct captain Albert R. Norton. Truman replies to Norton's letter where he inquires about the possibility of a job in city administration as he had just recently been fired from a Republican office because of his political affiliation. Truman finds no sympathy in Norton's plight since he abandoned the established Democratic organization for the United Democrats.

Date: 
May 23rd 1942

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Aviation Commissioner of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Russell Cantwell. Truman thanks Cantwell for sending him "a copy of a letter to the Secretary of War about the safety of air plants."

Date: 
January 7th 1942

Letter from Aviation Commissioner of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Russell Cantwell to Senator Harry S. Truman. Cantwell encloses a copy of a letter from William T. Grant to the U.S. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson. Cantwell then informs Truman that he will be in Washington D.C. the following week to meet with J. C. Nichols. In the enclosed letter, Grant lists the economic and social advantages of selecting Kansas City to build a new factory for airplanes.

Date: 
January 3rd 1942

A letter from William M. Boyle to James M. Pendergast in which Boyle inquires if Pendergast would like to renew his commission as an officer in the Army for combat in the second World War. Boyle makes it clear that, "it would mean immediate duty with the possibility of such duty being in the actual combat zone." Boyle then discusses the 1942 political campaign as it pertains to Kansas City and references "the Senator" (Harry S. Truman).

Date: 
February 17th 1942

A letter from James M. Pendergast to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Pendergast requests information from Truman pertaining to a rumored rationing of radios and radio equipment due to the war effort. Pendergast seeks this information because he has "some friends here engaged in the wholesale radio distribution business."

Date: 
September 12th 1942
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.