Search

Displaying 1 - 20 of 60

A color glass plate positive photograph of morning glories growing on George H. Nettleton residence, taken from the west. Five women are pictured seated on the porch.

Date: 
April 28th 1942

Letter from Independence, Missouri resident Louise Sheldon to Senator Harry S. Truman. Sheldon informs Truman that the Kansas City Star is attacking the reputation of Judge Marion D. Waltner of the Independence Division of the Circuit Court, labeling him "a Pendergast man." Sheldon then defends Waltner's reputation.

Date: 
December 2nd 1942

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Independence, Missouri resident Louise Sheldon. After Sheldon informs Truman that the Kansas City Star is attacking the reputation of Judge Marion D. Waltner of the Independence Division of the Circuit Court, Truman replies that little can be done to help Waltner in this situation.

Date: 
December 15th 1942

Letter from Democrat Albert R. Norton to Senator Harry S. Truman. Norton reintroduces himself as a former Pendergast ("goat") precinct captain in the 14th Ward in Kansas City, Missouri. He states that he could no longer be proud of such affiliation and became a United Democratic Club precinct captain. Norton then inquires about the possibility of a job in city administration as he had just recently been fired from a Republican office because of his political affiliation.

Date: 
May 12th 1942

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to former Pendergast precinct captain Albert R. Norton. Truman replies to Norton's letter where he inquires about the possibility of a job in city administration as he had just recently been fired from a Republican office because of his political affiliation. Truman finds no sympathy in Norton's plight since he abandoned the established Democratic organization for the United Democrats.

Date: 
May 23rd 1942

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to Aviation Commissioner of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Russell Cantwell. Truman thanks Cantwell for sending him "a copy of a letter to the Secretary of War about the safety of air plants."

Date: 
January 7th 1942

Letter from Aviation Commissioner of the Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Russell Cantwell to Senator Harry S. Truman. Cantwell encloses a copy of a letter from William T. Grant to the U.S. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson. Cantwell then informs Truman that he will be in Washington D.C. the following week to meet with J. C. Nichols. In the enclosed letter, Grant lists the economic and social advantages of selecting Kansas City to build a new factory for airplanes.

Date: 
January 3rd 1942

A letter from William M. Boyle to James M. Pendergast in which Boyle inquires if Pendergast would like to renew his commission as an officer in the Army for combat in the second World War. Boyle makes it clear that, "it would mean immediate duty with the possibility of such duty being in the actual combat zone." Boyle then discusses the 1942 political campaign as it pertains to Kansas City and references "the Senator" (Harry S. Truman).

Date: 
February 17th 1942

A letter from James M. Pendergast to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Pendergast requests information from Truman pertaining to a rumored rationing of radios and radio equipment due to the war effort. Pendergast seeks this information because he has "some friends here engaged in the wholesale radio distribution business."

Date: 
September 12th 1942

Photograph of a lily pond on the grounds of the St. Agnes Convent. This vantage point faces south-southeast with the auditorium and gym of St. Agnes Academy in the background.

Date: 
1942

Photograph of people standing outside the entrance to St. Vincent's Church. This vantage point faces west from the east side of Flora Avenue, just south of 31st Street.

Date: 
1942

Kansas City Police Department mugshot of organized crime figure Frank DeLuca.

Date: 
June 13th 1942

Kansas City Police Department mugshot of organized crime figure Frank DeLuca.

Date: 
June 12th 1942

Kansas City Police Department full length photographs of organized crime figure Joseph DeLuca.

Date: 
June 12th 1942

Photograph of Kansas City Mayor John B. Gage, who served from 1940 to 1946, with members of the City Council.

Date: 
August 17th 1942

Bill of court costs in Civil Action No. 42: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, listing clerk's costs, statutory attorney fee, witness fees, and marshal's fee, to be reimbursed. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
April 29th 1942

Letter from U.S. Marshal H. L. Dillingham to Charles Seibold, U.S. District Court clerk, in Civil Cases No. 42 and No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, reporting on payments received from J. H. Polson and plaintiff's attorney Carl R. Johnson toward marshal's costs and expenses in the case. Dillingham writes that his records show the accounts in the case balance.

Date: 
May 28th 1942

Envelope with a handwritten note from the files for Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S. W. Canada. The writing, signed by court deputy clerk E. O'Keefe, notes "Summons issued Jan 7, 1942." At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
January 7th 1942

Telegrams from the federal court clerk to Kenneth Teasdale, Carl R. Johnson, and A. D. Sappington in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada, writing that Judge John C. Collet directs a Bluford motion to be continued from Saturday to an undecided future date. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 5th 1942

Civil subpoena issued in Civil Case No. 128: Lucile Bluford v. S.W. Canada to Thelma Berlack Boozer of Lincoln University. She is commanded to appear in District Court on April 23, 1942, as a witness for the plaintiff. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and her effort to gain admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism, and repeated denials due to her race, lead to a a series of lawsuits that eventually reached the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
April 21st 1942

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.