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Photograph of the Holy Rosary Youths' Council and Boy Scout Troop 70. This vantage point faces east-northeast towards the entrance to the Holy Rosary Health Center and School.

Date: 
May 14th 1939

Letter from Special Agent R. C. Lynn regarding his investigation into Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L. Lynn argues that Higgins was appointed to his post as director of the Kansas City Police department "over the objections of Mr. T. J. Pendergast and the late Mr. H. F. McElroy, and was merely 'tolerated' by Pendergast while serving in that role.

Date: 
November 6th 1939

Admission summary for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records his family background, health and economic status, and makes custodial, educational, and work duty recommendations. The summary reports that he was involved in activities of a "questionable nature" with the Pendergast Machine. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 20th 1939

Mugshots of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55669-L. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 3rd 1939

Fingerprints and physical description card of Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which includes information on sentencing and detailed physical descriptions and measurements. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 3rd 1939

List of relatives and requested correspondents for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #5596-L, which includes the names and mailing addresses of his mother, wife, daughters, and other friends and family. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 7th 1939

Photograph of Edward L. Schneider, former aid to Thomas J. Pendergast. The caption on the back of the image reads, "CC 230102c... (Chicago Bureau) SUICIDE OR HOAX? KANSAS CITY, MO. - Edward L. Schneider of Kansas City Mo., who disappeared leaving suicide notes after appearing before the grand jury to testify concerning the affairs of Boss Tom Pendergast, whose aid he was. While police seek his body, federal investigators are checking theories of hoax and foul play. BFM#26-A 5-2-39. YOUR CREDIT LINE MUST READ "ACME"."

Date: 
May 2nd 1939

Record of interviews and visits for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, including dates of visits by his family members and attorneys between November 7, 1939, and June 2, 1941. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 7th 1939

FBI report for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, which records his charges and sentences. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 9th 1939

Photograph of Edward L. Schneider attached to a photograph of police searching for Schneider's body at the bottom of the Missouri River with nets. Schnider went missing after testifying against Thomas J. Pendergast. The caption reads, "Chi 27 - Kansas City, Mo. - E. L. Schneider and police dragging river."

Date: 
1939

FBI report on Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, listing the charges against him and sentence he received. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 9th 1939

Judgment and commitment in Criminal Case No. 14653: United States vs. Otto P. Higgins, defendant. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, entered a plea of guilty to counts 3 and 4 of income tax evasion, counts 1 and 2 having been entered nolle prosequi, and was sentenced to the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth for two years on count 3 and five years probation on count 4. He was delivered to the penitentiary on November 3, 1939.

Date: 
November 3rd 1939

Preliminary social abstract for Otto P. Higgins, Inmate #55996-L, recording his family history and employment and economic background. Higgins, the former director of the Kansas City Police Department, was sentenced to two years in the United States Penitentiary at Leavenworth on charges of income tax evasion.

Date: 
November 7th 1939

Press release announcing that, after a hearing at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth and further consideration in Washington, D.C., the United States Board of Parole concluded that "parole issuance in the case of Thomas J. Pendergast would be unjustifiable and incompatible with the public interest," and thus is denied.

Date: 
November 21st 1939

U.S. Attorney's report on Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which records Higgins' defense attorneys, summarizes the charges, and notes the sentence imposed. The report records as aggravating circumstances obstruction of justice, suborning perjury, and evidence of income tax violation in other years, though "proof only goes back to 1927." Judge Merrill Otis and U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan both recommend against parole.

Date: 
June 20th 1939

Report from Internal Revenue Service Special Agent Rudolph H. Hartmann submitted to the warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The report describes Pendergast's charges, convictions, and sentencing, as well as detailing the circumstances of his income tax evasion. The report also mentions that Pendergast may be subject to additional charges stemming from the investigation into R.

Date: 
June 6th 1939

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Date: 
November 4th 1939

Application for parole made by Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, for which he became eligible on October 28, 1939. He states that his plans upon release will be to return to his home to reside with his wife and family, and to return to work as president of Ready Mixed Concrete Company. In support of his application, he notes that this conviction was his first offense, and also notes that he is "constantly in need of Medical Attention." He lists James Kemper and R. P. Lyons as his parole advisor and employer, respectively.

Date: 
June 28th 1939

Letter from Special Agent Rudolph H. Hartmann regarding his investigation into Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295.

Date: 
June 6th 1939

Letter from U.S. Marshal A. D. Fairbanks to James V. Bennett, Director of the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Fairbanks inquires as to whether Frank Smith, a long-time friend of Pendergast, could receive permission to visit his friend at the penitentiary, after having been denied in the past due to Pendergast's poor health. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
December 7th 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.