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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his trip to Chicago and his breakfast with Leo Packer, Mr. Byers, and Dick Adams. Truman says, "Dick you know was a Republican alderman in Kansas City. He said he is for me and expected to do all he could."

Date: 
October 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his latest political maneuvers with Bennett C. Clark: "Mr. Clark and I have had a time trying to get to the W.P.A. office to recommend a man for [Matthew S.] Murray's place. It looks as if they would really put poor old Murray in the jug."

Date: 
October 25th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director: "It looks as if I'm going to get the W.P.A. Director I want. They are inclined to take Harry Easley. He's Alvin Hatton's brother-in-law and my friend and he'll make a good one."

Date: 
October 26th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his endeavor to select the new Kansas City W.P.A. Director and then comments about those affiliated with the Pendergast machine: "Mr. [Matthew S.] Murray, Mr. [Henry F.] McElroy, Mr. [Otto P.] Higgins, and even Mr. [Tom] P. himself probably would pay all the ill-gotten loot they took for my position and clear conscience."

Date: 
October 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Date: 
December 9th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman finds himself disconnected with Kansas City, but not by choice. Truman says that "It is a miserable state of affairs when a man dreads showing up in his home town because all his friends are either in jail or about to go there... The Star and even Willie never fail to emphasize my friendship with people whom they think may be a detriment politically to me."

Date: 
December 15th 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen discusses the matter of a new Judge for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Kitchen asserts that the court needs a judge from Missouri as it does not currently have a Missouri judge that can devote their time to hearing cases. Kitchen then recommends Charlie Carr for the position and asks Truman to pass this recommendation on to Bennett C. Clark and President Roosevelt.

Date: 
January 26th 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen warns that Democrats might have a difficult election in 1940 because of recent events in Congress. Kitchen suggests that Truman address some of these issues ahead of the 1940 campaign. Included is a reproduction of an article from the Armstrong Herald on February 16, 1939.

Date: 
February 18th 1939

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman addresses the WPA controversy previously mentioned by Kitchen. He defends his decision in interest of cutting federal expenses where need is no longer as critical. He also addresses other issues that Kitchen believes might hurt the Democratic party in the 1940 election.

Date: 
February 21st 1939

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen informs Truman that he spoke with Col. Bob Walton of Armstrong, Missouri. After explaining Truman's side of the story concerning the WPA issue, Kitchen reports that Walton agrees with Truman, but is still worried about the Democratic party in the 1940 campaign.

Date: 
March 25th 1939

Letter from Senator Harry S. Truman to William A. Kitchen in which Truman states he is glad that Walton and Kitchen had a agreeable discussion concerning the WPA controversy. He then comments on how rural carrier positions are filled, including the one currently open in Ash Grove, Missouri.

Date: 
March 27th 1939

A letter from The Forward Kansas City Committee to Kansas City mayor Bryce B. Smith. Committee chairman J. W. Perry urges Smith to dismiss Fred Bellemere, City Counsellor; Jerry J. Ryan, Director of Welfare Department; Preble Hall, Director of the Personnel Department; W. J. Teefey, Commissioner of Purchases and Supplies; and Matthew S. Murray, Director of Public Works. Perry outlines how the aforementioned staff is affiliated with the Pendergast machine and states that they must be dismissed to gain public confidence.

Date: 
May 31st 1939

Petition by J. C. Williams to Mayor Bryce B. Smith and City Manager Eugene C. Zachman for approval or rejection. Williams calls for the formation of the Municipal Employees Democratic Club, composed entirely of municipal employees, so that they may be dissociated with the Jackson Democratic Club (the Pendergast Machine). Williams then outlines the platform of the organization.

Date: 
1939

Speech made by Kansas City Mayor Bryce B. Smith on The Kansas City Star radio station WDAF on Sunday afternoon, 3:15, April 16, 1939. Smith proclaims that both he and the City Council are committed to "make Kansas City clean and to give to the people of this community a city of which they can be genuinely proud." Smith then updates the listeners on the local political events of the past 80 hours, including the resignation and replacement of the City Manager and Director of Police. He then speaks on city finances, the police department, and local economic confidence.

Date: 
April 16th 1939

Pla Mor pool with swimmers, taken by Cresswell's Phot Studio, Kansas City, Missouri, ca. 1939. The Pla-Mor was located at 3142 Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. Source: Art McClure/Jennie Belle Peters.

Date: 
1939

Pla Mor pool without swimmers, taken by Cresswell's Photo Studio, Kansas City, Missouri, ca. 1939. The Pla-Mor was located at 3142 Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. Source: Art McClure/Jennie Belle Peters.

Date: 
1939

Pla Mor artificial beach, ca. 1939. The Pla-Mor was located at 3142 Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. Source: Art McClure/Jennie Belle Peters.

Date: 
1939

Dancers at the Pla-Mor Ballroom, taken by Tynen & Murphy Photographers, Kansas City, Missouri, ca. 1939. The Pla-Mor was located at 3142 Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri. Source: Art McClure/Jennie Belle Peters.

Date: 
1939

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "After Her Sponsor Thought It Was in the Bag", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "Hatch Law" stopping "Della Gates" and her sponsor "Government Jobholders" from joining other winning delegates in the 1940 National Convention. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
July 24th 1939

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "And Such Nice New Buildings, Too", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "organized crime" hanging out to dry on clotheslines between the Kansas City City Hall and the Kansas City Court House. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
May 12th 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.