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Letter from Dorman H. O'Leary to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing actions taken against Jackson County politicians including County Prosecutor W. W. Graves and Sheriff James Williams. O'Leary is opposed to the sheriff's ouster and argues that "a grave injustice is being done to the only elected official in the court house who has conducted his office in a proper manner."

Date: 
May 9th 1939

Letter from Grover Childers to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding the Circuit Court in Jackson County, "and the fact that it is the seat of power behind the Pendergast machine."

Date: 
May 27th 1939

Letter from J. B. Moran to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing increased tax assessments being used as punishment for anti-Machine actions, and city work being used for a reward for pro-Pendergast actions. Moran says that the county "raised the valuation on my home in the sum of $550 as a penalty for my having signed a petition for recall election." The letter also references a suit to remove W. W. Graves, Jr. from office as Jackson County prosecutor.

Date: 
September 22nd 1939

An update to the Kansas City Anti-Vice Society about improvements in Kansas City vice conditions, from Nat Spencer, secretary. He reports that "a great many shacks of houses formerly used for disreputable purposes are torn down," "indecent shows are receiving the attention of the vice squad," and "public gambling houses are closed."

Date: 
September 28th 1939

Letter from Ashton Keith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark. Keith writes that Stark has a great deal of work remaining if he wishes to root out corruption and graft in Kansas City, as "all the splendid work that has been done by yourself and others positively has not yet even scratched the prime source of control of machine politics." He suggests that graft money can be traced to "two certain banks" and "can furnish some strong indications as to deep interest in ... the 'machine.'"

Date: 
December 1st 1939

Letter from Ashton Keith to Maurice M. Milligan suggesting that if Milligan should run for governor instead of Senate if he wishes to continue working against the Pendergast machine. He also writes that Pendergast "WAS NOT AND IS NOT THE REAL BOSS," and that "the Machine is far more strongly entrenched in Kansas City ... than most people realize."

Date: 
December 1st 1939

Letter from Governor Lloyd C. Stark to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, inviting Roosevelt to stop to speak at the State Capitol during a trip west. Stark writes that Roosevelt's "fine record and splendid help in aiding us in our local housecleaning is appreciated by every decent Missourian - certainly more than 90% of them."

Date: 
May 18th 1939

Newspaper article reporting on a speech given by Frederick E. Whitten in which he rails against the corruption of the Pendergast organization.

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Letter from Louis DeYoung to Tax Commissioner Jack Statpleton, asking if Governor Lloyd Stark would be able to speak at an upcoming meeting of the Reserve officer's Association.

Date: 
November 9th 1939

Letter from William E. Kemp to Governor Lloyd Stark, providing a confidential assessment of William Kirby, Chairlan of the Missouri Employment Commission.

Date: 
November 27th 1939

An anonymous letter praising Stark for his efforts to dismantle the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
April 10th 1939

Anonymous letter complaining about the gambling and other crime-related activities in Milan, Missouri.

Date: 
November 16th 1939

Letter from an unknown constituent in Kansas City complaining about the illegal activities of a pool hall in northeast Kansas City.

Date: 
September 25th 1939

Anonymous letter from a woman expressing fear of being murdered by her husband, who is an agent of the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
August 21st 1939

Letter from an anonymous depositor of Pioneer Trust Company bank, complaining about lack of available funds after the bank closed.

Date: 
April 14th 1939

Anonymous letter from "A Taxpayer" to Governor Lloyd Stark encouraging his work investigating tax assessment fraud taking place in Kansas City.

Date: 
March 10th 1939

Letter to Governor Stark threatening him with retribution for his efforts to crack down on pensions.

Date: 
February 11th 1939

Text of a speech given by William E. Byers in Slater, Missouri on April 20, 1939. It discusses the activities of the Pendergast political machine and his hope for a future government based on "Americanism."

Date: 
April 20th 1939

Letter from Malcolm D. Grimes to Jesse Barrett urging him to run again for Governor of Missouri "now that Gov. Stark has about finished off 'Uncle Tom.'"

Date: 
June 17th 1939

Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett describing his attempts to counteract and prosecute voting fraud during the 1936 election in Kansas City.

Date: 
November 29th 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.