Search

Displaying 1 - 20 of 59

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. James Fox to Governor Stark discouraging the appointment of a Pendergast-affiliated judge.

Date: 
December 11th 1939

Letter from A. J. Wilson of Lupus, Missouri outlining desireable candidates to fill a judge vacancy.

Date: 
December 4th 1939

Letter and newspaper clipping sent by J. R. Proctor to Governor Stark concerning the upcoming Senatorial race.

Date: 
December 3rd 1939

Letter from Kansas City resident David C. Bagby which claims that, despite some reforms, the Pendergast machine still controls the city, particularly the jobs.

Date: 
June 11th 1939

Letter from a construction foreman praising Gov. Stark for removing a Pendergast affiliate from the role of WPA Director. The letter outlines corruption taking place on a site at the River Des Peres near St. Louis.

Date: 
June 19th 1939

Brief letter that claims that federal spending in Platte County is completely run by Pendergast affiliates.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter to Governor Lloyd stark praising him for his efforts in removing Pendergast influence from the state management of WPA projects.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter that describe retaliation against a Kansas City employee who had collaborated with reformers, and including a St. Louis Star-Times clipping advocating the ouster of Matthew S. Murray as the state WPA director.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter signed by "A Republican Supporter" offering a tip about a corrupt construction scheme involving Pendergast supporters.

Date: 
June 22nd 1939

Letter alerting the Governor to the illegal activities of Roy Fulton, president of the union democratic club in Kansas City and operator of a brewery.

Date: 
July 2nd 1939

Letter from a former timekeeper on a Missouri WPA project, describing the corruption in place regarding the awarding of jobs. Gov. Lloyd Stark is CC-ed on the letter.

Date: 
July 3rd 1939

Letter from John T. Harding to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in the city and county government, as well as the local police department. He tells Stark that until he enacts new laws, "Kansas City will be at the mercy of the Organization. The Police Department is their gun; as long as they have it, they will make us step around." Harding also suggests that the Pendergast Machine has control over nearly every aspect of the city, "except the sewer system," and indicates that he believes most policemen are good and only acting on orders from above.

Date: 
May 5th 1939

Letter from Mrs. Charles L. Dwinell to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, complaining about the treatment of her husband by the police after he was stopped for speeding. She reports that he was put in a cell with no chair while waiting for her to arrive to post bond, despite being stopped for driving 11 miles over the speed limit. She also suggests that if Stark would "instruct them to be courteous and use a little discretion with people who have not committed a crime" that it would be "one way in which you can sell your state control idea."

Date: 
May 26th 1939

Letter from J. R. Morgan to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding Stark's work cleaning up Kansas City and its police department. He describes Captain Dougherty at Station #4 as "crooked as any man that ever walked the face of the earth."

Date: 
June 3rd 1939

Letter from George E. Kimball to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in public service. Kimball identifies himself as "a former judge of the Jackson County Court, a former City Comtroller of Kansas City, and a Republican candidate for Mayor of Kansas in 1930." He writes to recommend Fred H. Carlson as trustworthy, "clean in his private life as well as his public service," and "highly in favor of taking the police department out of the hands of the corrupt political machine here in Kansas City."

Date: 
June 8th 1939

Letter from A. B. Seymour to Governor Lloyd C. Stark providing background and opinions on potential police board appointee Ralph E. Murray, describing Murray as "strongly anti-Roosevelt and anti-labor" and "very average as a practicing lawyer," and discussing Murray's coworkers and other connections.

Date: 
July 19th 1939

Letter from Russell C. Cravens to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, thanking him for his work in cleaning up elections and the Kansas City police department. He also requests that Clark look into the "issuance of 'special lisences [sic] to the Kansas City political crowd," as they are routinely committing driving violations while using them. He is particularly upset at the "tax favoritism situation," noting large discrepancies between property tax assessments between his and other properties in his neighborhood.

Date: 
July 3rd 1939

Letter from M. E. Hartman to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, unenforce rape and other crimes occurring in Kansas City.

Date: 
August 10th 1939

Letter signed "A friend" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing specific incidents of fraud in the 1938 primary election.

Date: 
March 10th 1939

Letter from Olive Turner to Governor Lloyd C. Stark saying "it seems a shame that law abiding, tax-paying citizens have to get under cover and write to their Governor in order to live in this town." She expresses concerns about corruption, particularly at the state cosmetology board and the County Home for the Aged.

Date: 
March 25th 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.