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Letter from I. N. Watson to Jesse Barrett describing his attempts to counteract and prosecute voting fraud during the 1936 election in Kansas City.

Date: 
November 29th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

Date: 
July 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on the political maneuvering of Maurice M. Milligan and Bennett C. Clark and mentions that "Then Canfil came in with a whole string of trouble which I got straightened out to some extent and now John Madden and R.R. Brewster are here on a parole for Pendergast."

Date: 
September 25th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman provides his personal account of the Grand Lodge of Missouri Convention in Saint Louis, Missouri and his successful election to Deputy Master. Truman says, "If my friends hadn't put forth such an effort for me I'd have told 'em to go to hell with the office - and I almost did anyway. I'm glad now I didn't."

Date: 
September 28th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman at the Carroll Arms Hotel in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent travels including a meeting with Roy A. Roberts, president and editor of The Kansas City Star. Truman says that "Both Mr. Stark & Mr. Milligan were in Roy Roberts room when Charlie and I made the rounds and they both looked and acted like men without a country."

Date: 
December 9th 1939

U.S. Attorney's report on Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, which records Higgins' defense attorneys, summarizes the charges, and notes the sentence imposed. The report records as aggravating circumstances obstruction of justice, suborning perjury, and evidence of income tax violation in other years, though "proof only goes back to 1927." Judge Merrill Otis and U.S. Attorney Maurice M. Milligan both recommend against parole.

Date: 
June 20th 1939

Report from Internal Revenue Service Special Agent Rudolph H. Hartmann submitted to the warden of the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. The report describes Pendergast's charges, convictions, and sentencing, as well as detailing the circumstances of his income tax evasion. The report also mentions that Pendergast may be subject to additional charges stemming from the investigation into R.

Date: 
June 6th 1939

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Date: 
November 4th 1939
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.