Search

Displaying 1 - 11 of 11

Letter from Eva Benningfield to Dr. F. A. Middlebush, University of Missouri president, describing telegraphs "supposedly from Negro students" regarding the Gaines vs. Missouri case, and discussing media attention they are receiving. Lloyd Gaines, a young black Missouri man, sought admission to the University of Missouri's law school and was rejected on the basis of his race. The case eventually reached the Supreme Court, which decided in December 1938 that if only one school existed, students of all races must be admitted.

Date: 
February 2nd 1939

Telegram from Lucile Bluford to University of Missouri President F. A. Middlebush regarding her denial of admission to the university's journalism school. She notes that she was referred to Lincoln University, the state's black university, but that they offer no journalism courses. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
September 14th 1939

Letter from Sidney R. Redmond, an NAACP attorney, to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, inquiring after what action the university's Board of Curators took regarding Lucile Bluford's application to enter the School of Journalism. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 3rd 1939

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to attorney Nick Cave, forwarding him a copy of the letter from Sidney Redmond, and noting that the issue of Lucile Bluford's application to the university did not come before the Board of Curators. Middlebush also requests advice as to how to reply to Redmond's inquiry. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 5th 1939

Memo from University of Missouri registrar S. W. Canada to university president F. A. Middlebush, forwarding a copy of a letter from and reply to Lucile Bluford, which he writes that he has also forwarded to attorney Nick Cave. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
February 4th 1939

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to William S. Hogsett, forwarding a copy of a letter from NAACP attorney Sidney Redmond, and mentioning that Lucile Bluford's application to the university did not come before the Board of Curators. He requests Hogsett's advice in how to reply to Redmond's letter. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 5th 1939

Letter from attorney Nick T. Cave to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, regarding NAACP attorney Sidney Redmond's inquire about the status of Lucile Bluford's application to the university. He writes to concur with Jack Murray's suggested reply, and to reiterate that Bluford has knowledge of her correspondence, rejected her admission, with registrar S. W. Canada. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 7th 1939

Letter from the secretary to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to William S. Hogsett, thanking Hogsett for his letter of October 6 to Middlebush regarding Lucile Bluford, and reporting that the letter has been placed on the president's desk for his attention. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 7th 1939

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to attorney Nick Cave, thanking Cave for his letter of October 7 concerning the Lucile Bluford case. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism. After repeated efforts to enter the program, and repeated denials due to her race, she filed a lawsuit against the university that eventually was heard before the Missouri Supreme Court.

Date: 
October 9th 1939

Letter from University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush to NAACP attorney Sidney R. Redmond, reporting that Lucile Bluford's application never came before the university's Board of Curators, which can be proven in the minutes of the meeting, and noting that "under existing laws of this State," Bluford should apply to Lincoln University. At the time, Bluford was the managing editor of the Kansas City Call and seeking admittance to the masters degree program at MU's School of Journalism.

Date: 
October 9th 1939

Letter from attorney William S. Hogsett to University of Missouri President Frederick A. Middlebush, regarding the issue of whether or not Lucile Bluford's application to the university was ever dealt with by the university's Board of Curators.

Date: 
October 6th 1939
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.