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Press release announcing that, after a hearing at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth and further consideration in Washington, D.C., the United States Board of Parole concluded that "parole issuance in the case of Thomas J. Pendergast would be unjustifiable and incompatible with the public interest," and thus is denied.

Date: 
November 21st 1939

Transcript of minutes from Tom Pendergast's parole hearing before Arthur D. Wood, chairman of the United States Board of Parole. Pendergast notes his health problems, including a bad heart and colostomy, and lack of prior convictions, as reasons he should be released from the penitentiary. He also discusses his family, his role at Ready Mixed Concrete Company, and a pending indictment in state court.

Date: 
November 4th 1939

Letter from Floy Smith to the United States Parole Board regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Smith writes to protest the parole of Pendergast, saying that Pendergast surely "considered himself getting off very easy with only a 15-months' sentence," and that it would be just for him to serve the full sentence. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
September 29th 1939

Unsigned postcard, postmarked Kansas City, Kansas, addressed to Judge Arthur D. Wood, asking if he is "going to pardon that crook from KC," Tom Pendergast. The writer says that doing so would "encourage others to steal likewise," and that the sentence should have been ten times longer. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth.

Date: 
October 29th 1939

Letter from Lewis J. Grout, Chief U.S. Probation Officer, to Myrl E. Alexander, Acting Parole Executive with the Bureau of Prisons, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Grout summarizes Pendergast's case, noting he plead guilty to multiple charges of income tax evasion, and notes that there are special conditions of probation, including paying a fine and back taxes. Grout also draws attention to editorials from the May 22, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Star and the May 23, 1939 edition of the Kansas City Times.

Date: 
May 24th 1939

Document assessing information about Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295, as relates to his potential parole. The document includes statements that the Pendergast family "has lived in luxury," that Pendergast has no financially dependent family members, and notes that his reputation is divided - friends are "fanatical in their devotion and enemies are equally fanatical in their prejudices." Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Date: 
June 28th 1939

Letter from C. H. Waring, Chief Medical Officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, to N. R. Timmons, parole officer, regarding Tom Pendergast, Inmate #55295. Waring recommends that, due to Pendergast's poor health, the Board of Parole interview him in his hospital ward at Leavenworth Penitentiary, and specifically notes his numerous recent heart attacks, including one just a few weeks prior. Pendergast, known for his powerful Kansas City political machine and ties to organized crime, was found guilty of income tax evasion in 1939 and sentenced to 15 months in the U.S.

Date: 
October 30th 1939
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.