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Letter from Kansas City resident David C. Bagby which claims that, despite some reforms, the Pendergast machine still controls the city, particularly the jobs.

Date: 
June 11th 1939

Letter from a construction foreman praising Gov. Stark for removing a Pendergast affiliate from the role of WPA Director. The letter outlines corruption taking place on a site at the River Des Peres near St. Louis.

Date: 
June 19th 1939

Brief letter that claims that federal spending in Platte County is completely run by Pendergast affiliates.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter to Governor Lloyd stark praising him for his efforts in removing Pendergast influence from the state management of WPA projects.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Letter signed by "A Republican Supporter" offering a tip about a corrupt construction scheme involving Pendergast supporters.

Date: 
June 22nd 1939

Letter alerting the Governor to the illegal activities of Roy Fulton, president of the union democratic club in Kansas City and operator of a brewery.

Date: 
July 2nd 1939

Letter from a former timekeeper on a Missouri WPA project, describing the corruption in place regarding the awarding of jobs. Gov. Lloyd Stark is CC-ed on the letter.

Date: 
July 3rd 1939

Letter from John T. Harding to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in the city and county government, as well as the local police department. He tells Stark that until he enacts new laws, "Kansas City will be at the mercy of the Organization. The Police Department is their gun; as long as they have it, they will make us step around." Harding also suggests that the Pendergast Machine has control over nearly every aspect of the city, "except the sewer system," and indicates that he believes most policemen are good and only acting on orders from above.

Date: 
May 5th 1939

Letter from J. R. Morgan to Governor Lloyd C. Stark regarding Stark's work cleaning up Kansas City and its police department. He describes Captain Dougherty at Station #4 as "crooked as any man that ever walked the face of the earth."

Date: 
June 3rd 1939

Letter from George E. Kimball to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, discussing corruption in public service. Kimball identifies himself as "a former judge of the Jackson County Court, a former City Comtroller of Kansas City, and a Republican candidate for Mayor of Kansas in 1930." He writes to recommend Fred H. Carlson as trustworthy, "clean in his private life as well as his public service," and "highly in favor of taking the police department out of the hands of the corrupt political machine here in Kansas City."

Date: 
June 8th 1939

Letter from Grover Childers to Governor Lloyd C. Stark reporting on current activities of the Pendergast machine, and opinions about Stark's efforts to clean up the police department. Childers also reports that President Roosevelt "is not in sympathy with political machines that defeat the public in elections."

Date: 
March 30th 1939

Letter from Dorman H. O'Leary to Governor Lloyd C. Stark discussing actions taken against Jackson County politicians including County Prosecutor W. W. Graves and Sheriff James Williams. O'Leary is opposed to the sheriff's ouster and argues that "a grave injustice is being done to the only elected official in the court house who has conducted his office in a proper manner."

Date: 
May 9th 1939

Letter from J. B. Moran to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, describing increased tax assessments being used as punishment for anti-Machine actions, and city work being used for a reward for pro-Pendergast actions. Moran says that the county "raised the valuation on my home in the sum of $550 as a penalty for my having signed a petition for recall election." The letter also references a suit to remove W. W. Graves, Jr. from office as Jackson County prosecutor.

Date: 
September 22nd 1939

Letter from Ashton Keith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark. Keith writes that Stark has a great deal of work remaining if he wishes to root out corruption and graft in Kansas City, as "all the splendid work that has been done by yourself and others positively has not yet even scratched the prime source of control of machine politics." He suggests that graft money can be traced to "two certain banks" and "can furnish some strong indications as to deep interest in ... the 'machine.'"

Date: 
December 1st 1939

Letter from Ashton Keith to Maurice M. Milligan suggesting that if Milligan should run for governor instead of Senate if he wishes to continue working against the Pendergast machine. He also writes that Pendergast "WAS NOT AND IS NOT THE REAL BOSS," and that "the Machine is far more strongly entrenched in Kansas City ... than most people realize."

Date: 
December 1st 1939

Newspaper article reporting on a speech given by Frederick E. Whitten in which he rails against the corruption of the Pendergast organization.

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Letter from Louis DeYoung to Tax Commissioner Jack Statpleton, asking if Governor Lloyd Stark would be able to speak at an upcoming meeting of the Reserve officer's Association.

Date: 
November 9th 1939

Letter from William E. Kemp to Governor Lloyd Stark, providing a confidential assessment of William Kirby, Chairlan of the Missouri Employment Commission.

Date: 
November 27th 1939

An anonymous letter praising Stark for his efforts to dismantle the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
April 10th 1939

Letter from an unknown constituent in Kansas City complaining about the illegal activities of a pool hall in northeast Kansas City.

Date: 
September 25th 1939

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.