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Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Date: 
November 22nd 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he will be calling President Roosevelt concerning James K. Vardaman, Jr and court proposition and executive reorganization plan.

Date: 
February 8th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reaffirms his aversion to those patronizing him: "For instance old man Porter, president of the Power and Light, wrote me the most patronizing letter you ever saw. I burned him to a cinder and mailed it while it was hot… The thing that makes me stronger than ever for F.D.R. is that most of these smart alecks tell me I'd better line up with Bennett."

Date: 
February 21st 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Date: 
March 10th 1937

Letter from William A. Kitchen to Senator Harry S. Truman in which Kitchen suggests a way in which Truman can put in a replacement for Maurice M. Milligan as U.S. attorney at Kansas City. Kitchen proposes that the President could appoint a new attorney of Truman's choosing, but keep Milligan as a special prosecutor for the Kansas City voter fraud cases. By doing so, Truman can control the placement without the Kansas City newspapers accusing him of trying to suppress the prosecution of voter fraud.

Date: 
December 7th 1937

Indictment in Criminal Case No. 13646: United States vs. Ellis Buck, Sam Brenner, Viola Doss, Louise Davis, Ruth Tucker, and Frances M. Eaton, defendants. The defendants were charged with conspiring to impede citizens' right to vote and have that vote truthfully counted in the 15th Precinct of the 12th Ward during the November 3, 1936 election.

Date: 
January 9th 1937

Citizens' League Bulletin issue with the main article reporting on the 1936 Election Voter Fraud Trials and general corrpution in Kansas City. Other articles document the cost of crime, air transportation, tax dogers, economic plans, federal salaries, and Kansas City gambling.

Date: 
June 12th 1937

Clipping from Time (magazine) on February 22, 1937 detailing the election fraud that occured in Kansas City during the 1936 General Election. The article features extended quotes from Judge Albert L. Reeves concerning the election fraud, including the following: "We can't surrender the ballot boxes to thugs, gangsters and plug-uglies who patrol the streets with machine guns. We can't stand for that any longer." The article then provides a history of political corruption in Kansas City through 1936.

Date: 
February 22nd 1937
KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.