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Political cartoon and accompanying message urging support for Republican gubernatorial candidate Jesse Barrett.

Date: 
1936

Political cartoon and statement criticizing Lloyd Stark, Democratic candidate for Missouri Governor over the party's alleged theft of pension funds.

Date: 
1936

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "This Modern Age" (18th Amendment resubmission), no date. The drawing depicts the Missouri Republican Party casting off their shroud of 18th Amendment endorsement jumping into a pool of "resubmission". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Somehow I Don't Feel Too Hopeful", no date. The drawing shows depictions of "ghost votes" and "protected crime" looking at a depiction of "election and police board appointments". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
May 22nd 1941

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "It Sometimes Looks Like We Hadn't Come Very Far", no date. The drawing shows depictions of gangsters, "disregard for law", kidnappers, crime, murder, and racketeers abuse civilization as prehistoric life watches. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "After Her Sponsor Thought It Was in the Bag", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "Hatch Law" stopping "Della Gates" and her sponsor "Government Jobholders" from joining other winning delegates in the 1940 National Convention. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
July 24th 1939

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "little business" falling out of the frying pan of New Deal economics and into the fire of "priorities and allocations". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
October 25th 1941

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "And Such Nice New Buildings, Too", no date. The drawing shows a depiction of "organized crime" hanging out to dry on clotheslines between the Kansas City City Hall and the Kansas City Court House. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
May 12th 1939

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Armistice Day, or Just Nov 11", no date. The drawing depicts "Nov 11" as a cluster of bombs falling toward an anthropomorphic Earth as it takes cover in a bomb shelter. Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Date: 
November 11th 1937

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and description of Kansas City FBI agent Lieutenant William Gordon, "commended by J. Edgar Hoover," in an article about the crime-fighting operations of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and its relation to Kansas City crime. Sheriff Bash, Chief Coffey, Director Reppert, Chief of Detectives Thomas Higgins, and Lieutenant George Rayen are also discussed. Other featured articles include: “Journey to the K.C.

Date: 
February 8th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about drugstores, such as the Katz chain, that now sell other goods such as groceries, liquor, and general merchandise, and how they evade laws limiting the days traditional grocery and liquor stores can remain open. Other featured articles include: “We’ve Got the Equipment” (p. 2), regarding new forensic investigation techniques touted by J.

Date: 
February 15th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, asserting that it “is well established that there are approximately three thousand persons drawing pay from the city when the work actually is being done by about fifteen hundred,” the impact that has on salaries, and the departments in which the issue is most evident. Other featured articles include: “You May Live Till March, Cabbies” (p.

Date: 
February 22nd 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Date: 
March 1st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the crime rate for auto theft and parts stripping in Kansas City compared to Saint Louis and description of its inaccurate measurements by the Kansas City Police Department not accepted by the FBI, with photo of a stripped car and a portrait of J. Edgar Hoover. Other featured articles include: “One Year Ago This Week” (p.

Date: 
March 8th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Date: 
March 22nd 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today.

Date: 
March 29th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, with a photo and brief history of the Kansas City Municipal Airport (later called the Downtown Airport) "between North Kansas City and Kansas City proper," dedicated in 1927 and opened in 1929 with four airlines and reorganization after "cancellation of government mail contracts" in 1934. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots of the Week” (p.

Date: 
March 15th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the mismanagement and financing of garbage removal in Kansas City, rating the city the worst among its other cities of its size for annual garbage production, from statistics garnered by the Civil Research Institute. Other featured articles include: “Only a Bootlegger” (p. 2), biographical article about "Mr.

Date: 
April 12th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about "Dr. Schorer," a 54-year old pediatric physician appointed by Henry McElroy as the city's Director of Health, born in Wisconsin in 1881 and coming to Kansas City in 1913. Other featured articles include: “Politics and Hogs” (p. 2), about local hotels and restaurants selling their garbage to be used as hog feed and interference by the Kansas City Collection Company; “’S Not ‘N Eagle—‘S ‘N Owl” (p.

Date: 
April 19th 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes a photo and article, continued on page 8, about the business of Peter Lapetina, "funeral director at 536 Campbell" Street, connected with an associate at General Hospital Number One in a racket of charging all of its deceased's family members for rights to their corpses. Other featured articles include: “Laws and the Hawg” (p.

Date: 
April 26th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.