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1940s photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs standing side by side on field with fans in stands behind team in Kansas City, Missouri. From left to right players are identified as N. Allen, R. Bibbs, W. Sims, L Bryant, W. Brown, J. Williams, F. Bradley, H. Smith, K. Duncan, L. Greene, F. Smith, G. Walker, J. O'Neil, T. Strong, C. Johnson, S, Paige.

Kansas City Monarchs and Hilldale Giants standing side by side at the opening game Negro Leagues' first Colored World Series in Kansas City, Missouri on October 11, 1924. From left to right players and officials are identified as Loyd, McNair, Joseph, Morris, C Johnson, Roban, Allen, Menpez, Moore, W. Bell, Hawkins, Duncan, C. Bell, Mothell, McCall, Drake, Sweatt, Wilkinson, Dr Smith, Spedden, Pompez, Foster, Bolden, Santop, Winters, Cuffie, Lee, Carr, C. Johnson, J. Johnson, Ryan, Mackey, Allen, Campbell, Lewis, Thomas, Cockrell, Briggs, Werfeld, Stevens, Lambert.

Date: 
October 11th 1924

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs playing baseball at Muehlebach Field in Kansas City, MO.

Photograph of L. D. Livingston of the Kansas City Monarchs. The photo appears to be autographed "To Vessa From a Friend, L. D. Livingston." Vessa is likely VeEssa Spivey of Black Hawk Barbecue.

Photograph taken between 1935 and 1943 of a baseball game at the North American Aviation Athletic Field, Fairfax, Kansas City, Kansas. The game was part of a program supported by the Works Progress Administration.

1920's photograph taken of Kansas City Monarchs players believed to be (left to right): Newt Joseph (seated); Newt Allen (seated); Carroll Ray "Dink" Mothell (standing); Wilber "Bullet Joe" Rogan (seated); T. J. Young (standing); Frank Duncan (seated); Halley Harding (standing in back); Army Cooper (standing in front); unidentified (standing); and, Leroy Taylor (standing). Digital reproduction of the photographs was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.

Photograph taken between 1935 and 1943 of a baseball game at the North American Aviation Athletic Field, Fairfax, Kansas City, Kansas. The game was part of a program supported by the Works Progress Administration.

1920's photograph taken of Kansas City Monarchs players T.J. Young, Wilber "Bullet Joe" Rogan, and Carroll Ray "Dink" Mothell (left to right). Digital reproduction of the photographs was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.

Photograph taken between 1935 and 1943 of a baseball game between the Army and Navy at Kensington Park, Kansas City, Kansas. This activity part of the Works Progress Administration.

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs baseball team at Natatorium Park in Spokane, Washington. The franchise was organized in 1920 and located in Kansas City, Missouri. It became the longest running Negro League team in the United States before disbanding in 1965. The players have been identified by their respected rows. Back row: left to right; Frank Duncan, Sr., Andy Cooper, Charles "Hooks" Beverly, Chet Brewer, Sam Crawford, John Donaldson, George Giles, T.J. Young.

Date: 
July 4th 1934

1930's photograph of Kansas Monarchs' trainer James Floyd, commonly know as Jew Baby Floyd, wearing the baseball team's uniform.

1930's photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs baseball team. The franchise was organized in 1920 and located in Kansas City, Missouri. It became the longest running Negro League team in the United States before disbanding in 1965.

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, discussing the difficulty of accessing city records for citizens or reporters. Other featured articles include: “Snapshots” (p. 1), with quick items that include Nell Donnelly Reed having been rated fourth in a list of the most prominent business women in the country; “Seven Eleven” (p.

Date: 
March 22nd 1935

Program distributed for the Muehlebach Field dedication on July 3, 1923, including a proclamation by Mayor Frank H. Cromwell recommending that "every employer forget the ever present serious side of life" in order to attend, and let employees attend, the opening game. To set the example, Cromwell declared that day a half-holiday for city employees. The program also notes speeches from George Muehlebach, the governors of Kansas and Missouri,and mayors of Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas. Photographs depict the stadium, the team, and local supporters.

Date: 
July 3rd 1923

Panoramic photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs, including L-R: Jack Marshall (P), Hurley McNair (OF/P) , Newt Joseph (3B), Harold 'Yellowhorse' Morris (P), Heavy Johnson (OF), Newt Allen (1B/SS), 'Bullet Joe' Rogan (P), Jose Mendez (P), Dobie Moore (SS), Lemuel Hawkins (1B), William Bell (P), C. Bell, Dink Mothel (UT), Frank Duncan (C), Bill Drake (P), George Sweatt (CF), and Howard Bartlett (P).

Date: 
1924

Photograph of the Kansas City Monarchs baseball team at Natatorium Park in Spokane, Washington. The franchise was organized in 1920 and located in Kansas City, Missouri. It became the longest running Negro League team in the United States before disbanding in 1965. The players have been identified by their respected rows. Back row: left to right; Frank Duncan, Sr., Andy Cooper, Charles "Hooks" Beverly, Chet Brewer, Sam Crawford, John Donaldson, George Giles, T.J. Young.

Date: 
July 4th 1934

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.