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Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. Written while Truman was attending the 1936 Democratic National Convention, Truman comments on several small details concerning the convention, including the fact that "Mrs. [Bennett C.] Clark was there and sat with the delegation--quite a concession as she had a box seat on the stage. I was given one for you but gave it to T.J. [Tom Pendergast]."

Date: 
June 25th 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman at The Majestic in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman gives Bess his opinion of the 1936 Democratic National Convention and mentions that James M. Pendergast was present. He also makes note that the date marks his seventeenth anniversary with Bess.

Date: 
June 28th 1936

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his recent meetings in which he has "been politicking around among the Senators and Congressmen, distributing a little hooch where it would do the most good, and trying to find out what they think of Bennett Champ Clark for President."

Date: 
January 10th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of some political maneuvering involving Bennett C. Clark, saying that "It would have been taken for an obvious attempt on my part to keep him and the St. Louis gang from the Gov. and I don't want to do that."

Date: 
January 24th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he will be calling President Roosevelt concerning James K. Vardaman, Jr and court proposition and executive reorganization plan.

Date: 
February 8th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess that he declined an offer from Lucky. He says, "Wouldn't my friends, who know my love for cigarettes, have a grand time wondering how much it takes to buy me[?]"

Date: 
February 10th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman reaffirms his aversion to those patronizing him: "For instance old man Porter, president of the Power and Light, wrote me the most patronizing letter you ever saw. I burned him to a cinder and mailed it while it was hot… The thing that makes me stronger than ever for F.D.R. is that most of these smart alecks tell me I'd better line up with Bennett."

Date: 
February 21st 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of a growing rift between Truman and Bennett C. Clark: "Bennett, I suppose will be in Kansas City Saturday. I told him if he was looking for a split in the Democratic Party he could very easily find it and perhaps now is as good a time as any to have it."

Date: 
March 10th 1937

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his first encounters with his future wife, Bess Wallace; his start in politics at the hands of Mike Pendergast; and his decision to join the military.

Date: 
May 1931

A longhand note written by Harry S. Truman while he was a judge for Jackson County, Missouri. In this note, Truman recounts his childhood and early adulthood. Notable events described include his construction of the Jackson County Courthouse, his start in politics, and his family history.

Date: 
May 14th 1934

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KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.