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Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 22, 1937. Plummer updates Mitchell on her conversation with Ewing C. Bland concerning Plummer's termination as clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals. She transmits Bland's response to Mitchell's most recent letter to him, communicating that using his influence to retain Plummer in her position would hurt his reelection campaign in the near future. Although Bland asserts he is not under any political influence, Plummer strongly disagrees and urges Mitchell not to further anger him.

Date: 
January 22nd 1936

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to his nephew, Kansas City Court of Appeals Judge Ewing C. Bland, on January 25, 1937. Mitchell asserts that Bland should resign as judge if Pendergast continues to influence the court. He then substantiates his claim by providing quotes from Bland and Marie Plummer. Mitchell also provides a case as to why Plummer should be retained in her clerical position at the Kansas City Court of Appeals.

Date: 
January 25th 1936

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. Plummer reports that a friend, Clif Langsdale, was able to extend her employment as deputy clerk at the Kansas City Court of Appeals potentially until August 1, 1937. She recounts a conversation she had with Bland in which Bland does not believe the court to be influenced by Pendergast since the machine does not dictate opinions. However, Plummer believes the court to be compromised since all recently hired employees come with a Pendergast endorsement.

Date: 
February 2nd 1937

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 2, 1937. In this restrained letter, Bland attempts to undermine the credibility of Marie Plummer and her statements she charged Bland with saying. He then clarifies his position on Plummer's continued employment at the Kansas City Court of Appeals and details the actions he used to try to help her. Bland then asserts again that Mitchell's statements against the machine compromised Plummer's chances of continued employment as deputy clerk.

Date: 
February 2nd 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Marie Plummer in which Mitchell congratulates Plummer on the extension of her employment at the Kansas City Court of Appeals. He then provides excerpts and a copy of Ewing C. Bland's most recent letter to Mitchell concerning Plummer. Mitchell also suggests that she begin searching for a new job immediately.

Date: 
February 8th 1937

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 28, 1937. Hirth discusses Missouri politics ahead of the 1940 U.S. Senate campaign.

Date: 
February 28th 1937

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 19, 1940. Whitten responds to William Hirth's suggestion that he run for office in the 1940 election.

Date: 
March 19th 1940

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 22, 1940. Whitten discusses his thoughts on Missouri political candidates ahead of the 1940 election.

Date: 
March 19th 1940

Letter from William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 13, 1940, regarding concerns over the New Deal. Hirth also attempts to rally support for Lloyd C. Stark for his efforts in dismantling the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
April 13th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

Date: 
April 20th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on May 29, 1940. Mitchell discusses Thomas J. Pendergast and James A. Farley stance in relation to the presidential candidacy of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932.

Date: 
May 29th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Senator Manvel H. Davis on August 15, 1940. Mitchell discusses the results of the 1940 primary election in Missouri and stresses the importance of an honest election in November.

Date: 
August 15th 1940

Letter from Albert K. Mitchell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on August 27, 1940. Albert acknowledges receipt of information provided by Ewing concerning Pendergast support of Truman's senate reelection campaign. Albert also discusses U.S. Senator of New Mexico Carl Hatch and his support for the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
August 27th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Joseph C. Fennelly of Cook Paint and Varnish Co., on August 28, 1904, regarding Pendergast contracting companies and available work in Central America.

Date: 
August 28th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
September 13th 1940

Two-page typewritten article titled, "Hon. John T. Wayland Overrules the U. S. Supreme Court and Appoints a Democrat. - A Republican After Holding the Sinecure for Thirty Years Is Deposed - An Interesting Story from Washington" by an unknown author. Includes a vote tally from Kansas City wards and handwritten notes in Ewing Young Mitchell Jr.'s hand.

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee discusses the removal of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. from his appointment as assistant secretary of commerce in the Roosevelt Administration.

Date: 
June 19th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman informs McGee he was able to speak with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and reassure him that Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. was not recommended for political appointment by Pendergast Organization, or by the state organization of Missouri. Mitchell was recently removed from his position as assistant secretary of commerce.

Date: 
June 21st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Date: 
March 1st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on page 8, about the escape from federal police in Kansas City of Sam Randazzo, "a St. Louis gangster" being released from Leavenworth, with the help of police officials Otto Higgins and Jeff Rayen. Other featured articles include: “Patriots Go to Riverside” (p.

Date: 
May 24th 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.