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Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Hill discusses prospective candidates for U.S. Senate in Missouri. With Harry S. Truman and Jacob L. Milligan being the two most likely Democratic candidates, Hill prefers Milligan for his anti-Pendergast stance.

Date: 
May 8th 1934

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 20, 1934. O'Donnell comments on the Democratic candidates in the 1934 campaign for U.S. Senator of Missouri. He implicates Harry S. Truman, saying he "has been so faithful in following the dictates of the political machine, that they have promoted him and now are trying to name him senator from this state, knowing well that the machine interests will never suffer from his acts."

Date: 
May 20th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree discusses the possible outcome of the U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri. He predicts Bennett C. Clark will be "diplomatic enough and spineless enough in case Thurman [Truman] is nominated and elected... to get in the good graces of 'Boss Tom.'"

Date: 
May 21st 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in which Foree requests an appointment to the Treasury Alcohol Tax Unit as an Internal Revenue officer, commonly called "Prohibition Agents". Foree also informs Mitchell that John J. Cochran entered the race for U.S. Senate of Missouri.

Date: 
May 23rd 1934

Letter from George G. Vest to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 1, 1934. Vest asks for Mitchell's support of John J. Cochran for U.S. Senator and describes Cochran's growing support in Missouri.

Date: 
June 1st 1934

Letter from C. W. Greenwade to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 4, 1934. Greenwade inquires what candidate for U.S. Senate in Missouri he should openly support and comments that he believes John J. Cochran will when the primary.

Date: 
June 4th 1934

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Date: 
June 14th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 19, 1934. In the U.S. Senate race, Foree notes candidates Jacob L. Milligan and John J. Cochran fighting each other, but notes little press in St. Louis on Harry S. Truman. On this point, Foree comments, "Pendergast never did hunt ducks with a brass band."

Date: 
June 19th 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 26, 1934. Foree reports on John J. Cochran's political meeting in St. Louis of the previous evening and on Cochran's projected polling in St. Louis. He recounts, "They are claiming 10 to 1 of all the combined votes of [Jacob L.] Milligan and [Harry S.] Truman in the city." Foree also mentions that Cochran recently traveled to Kansas City to meet with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
June 26th 1934

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 10, 1934. Hill reports from Kansas City that Frederick Whitten is campaigning against Truman and that John Lazia was shot that previous night.

Date: 
July 10th 1934

Letter from A. Ross Hill to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on July 18, 1934. Hill reports from Kansas City on a Jacob L. Milligan campaign event, the aftermath of John Lazia's death, and campaign speeches against Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
July 18th 1934

Letter from an unknown author (possibly Martin J. Collins of St. Louis, Missouri) to "Bob" on July 23, 1934, regarding the U.S. Senate race in Missouri. The author comments that Harry S. Truman, John J. Cochran, and Jacob L. Milligan are all campaigning to undecided voters in upstate, rural Missouri.

Date: 
July 23rd 1934

Letter from T. O'Donnell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on December 5, 1934. O'Donnell reports that the St. Louis Star decided not to report the information on the Pendergast machine that O'Donnell provided to them. He also comments on the aftermath of the 1934 election and inquires if Mitchell could place him in an administrative position.

Date: 
December 5th 1934

Letter from Marie Plummer to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 15, 1937. Plummer recounts when she was informed that she was fired from her clerical work at the District Court of Appeals in Kansas City. She then details her attempts at reinstatement by appealing to those close to Thomas J. Pendergast.

Date: 
January 15th 1937

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to William Hirth, publisher and managing editor of The Missouri Farmer, on April 20, 1940. Mitchell supports Lloyd C. Stark's efforts to dismantle the Pendergast Machine, but says that he cannot endorse Stark or anyone else that supports the New Deal. Mitchell also states that "The machine is by no means dead," and that it "is very much alive, not only in Kansas City, but throughout the state." He then provides his opinion on the outlook of the upcoming election for U.S. Senator from Missouri.

Date: 
April 20th 1940

Letter from Albert K. Mitchell to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on August 27, 1940. Albert acknowledges receipt of information provided by Ewing concerning Pendergast support of Truman's senate reelection campaign. Albert also discusses U.S. Senator of New Mexico Carl Hatch and his support for the Pendergast Machine.

Date: 
August 27th 1940

Letter from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to Westbrook Pegler, newspaper columnist, on September 13, 1940. Mitchell informs Pegler of Senator Carl Hatch's ties to Thomas J. Pendergast and Harry S. Truman.

Date: 
September 13th 1940

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee discusses the removal of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. from his appointment as assistant secretary of commerce in the Roosevelt Administration.

Date: 
June 19th 1935

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman informs McGee he was able to speak with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and reassure him that Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. was not recommended for political appointment by Pendergast Organization, or by the state organization of Missouri. Mitchell was recently removed from his position as assistant secretary of commerce.

Date: 
June 21st 1935

Issue of the anti-corruption, Kansas City-based newspaper, Future: The Newsweekly for Today. The front page includes an article, continued on pages 3 and 8, about the selling of merchandise stolen from Kansas merchants in Kansas City pawn shops, and description of the subsequent closing of small shops not tied to the Pendergast machine and sentencing of a black man to 40 years in jail in lieu of convicting the proprietor of a guilty shop at 9th and Main Streets, and other issues. Other featured articles include: “Fame!” (p.

Date: 
March 1st 1935

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.