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Letter from Frank P. Walsh, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on February 20, 1932. Walsh discusses Pendergast's patronage concerning Mitchell's and Franklin D. Roosevelt's individual campaigns.

Date: 
February 20th 1932

Letter from H. B. Blair to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. in early 1932. Blair admits that he will support Charles Hay and Dearmont if they start an anti-Pendergast movement, saying that as a Democrat he would rather have a Republican Missouri than one controlled by boss rule.

Date: 
1932

Telegram from Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. to judge Casmir J. Welch on March 24, 1932. Mitchell encourages Cas Welch's support of Franklin D. Roosevelt for President.

Date: 
March 24th 1932

Letter from Kansas City Court of Appeals judge, Ewing C. Bland, to his uncle, Ewing Young, Mitchell, Jr. on March 27, 1932. Bland updates Mitchell on his meeting with James P. Aylward and recounts the individual opinions of Aylward, Thomas J. Pendergast and Cas Welch of Franklin D. Roosevelt as the Democratic nominee for President.

Date: 
March 27th 1932

Letter from George G. Vest, attorney and counselor at law, to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 10, 1932. Vest comments that Thomas J. Pendergast's personal physician, Dr. D. M. Nigro, would speak with Pendergast on Vest's behalf. He also discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's Presidential primary campaign.

Date: 
May 10th 1932

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 13, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Date: 
May 13th 1932

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 23, 1932. Reilly discusses Franklin D. Roosevelt's primary campaign as it relates to Kansas City and northwestern Missouri politics.

Date: 
May 23rd 1932

Letter from Barney E. Reilly to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on November 8, 1932. Reilly expresses his desire to position himself for one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration appointments. He requests Mitchell's help in securing one and proposes methods at acquiring influence from acquaintances for it.

Date: 
November 8th 1932

Letter from C. H. Williams to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 7, 1934. Williams praises Mitchell in his fight against the Pendergast machine and inquires if there is a vacancy in Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration that Williams could fill.

Date: 
March 7th 1934

Letter from C. J. Hitchcock to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 22, 1934. Hitchcock praises Mitchell for his public attack on Thomas J. Pendergast and discusses unemployment among trained railroad men.

Date: 
March 22nd 1934

Letter from Martin J. (M. J.) Collins to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on April 2, 1934. Collins laments the victory of the Pendergast machine in the recent Kansas City local election. He also comments on national political matters concerning Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Date: 
April 2nd 1934

Letter from G. H. Foree to Ewing young Mitchell, Jr. on May 9, 1934. Foree warns of Republican attacks on the Democratic administration in power and requests information concerning candidates for U.S. Senator in Missouri.

Date: 
May 9th 1934

Letter from Mrs. T. W. Marr to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on May 16, 1934, with attached letter. Marr urges Mitchell to combat the corruption in Kansas City and comments how she was turned down for a job in Marshall, Missouri because she did not have Thomas J. Pendergast's endorsement.

Date: 
May 16th 1934

Memorandum Prepared by Mr. Mitchell's Secretary Giving Content of Letter Written by Lyman G. Coffin of Kansas City, Missouri. The document recounts Coffin's part in a voter fraud incident on March 6, 1934. In attempt to get employment, Coffin took orders from a Pendergast precinct captain to "ghost" vote. After being exposed of voter fraud, he was severely injured by an anti-Pendergast gang. He requests that the Pendergast headquarters provide for his medical bills and for his wife until he is able to get a job.

Date: 
June 1934

Letter from G. H Foree to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 14, 1934. Foree speculates how the current field of U.S. Senate candidates for Missouri formed and who will win at election. He comments, "This coming primary is not one in which the choice of Democracy will win- it will be Boss manipulated."

Date: 
June 14th 1934

Letter from Frederick R. Barkhurst to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 18, 1935. Barkhurst praises Mitchell for his stance against Thomas J. Pendergast and encourages Mitchell to run for the next governor of Missouri.

Date: 
June 18th 1935

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on June 21, 1935. Despite talk in Kansas City of Thomas J. Pendergast's power in Washington D.C., Whitten praises Mitchell for his stance against Pendergast's influence. He comments, "Socialism, Bossism, and gang control have no part in Democratic or American Government, and those of us who have a true concern and regard for the history and accomplishments of the Democratic party cannot help but look with alarm to the future of the party."

Date: 
June 21st 1935

A ten page typewritten history of Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr.'s political career in relation to Missouri politics through 1935 when the President of the United States removed him from office.

Date: 
1936

Letter from Ewing C. Bland to his uncle, Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on January 20, 1936. In Bland's lengthy response, he explains how the public views Bland and Mitchell to be connected politically, and how Mitchell consistently jeopardizes Bland by attacking the Kansas City organization for Mitchell's own political gain. Because of Bland's diminished political standing and Mitchell's public connection with Marie Plummer, it would be impossible to leverage for her reinstatement without being charged with nepotism.

Date: 
January 20th 1936

Letter from Frederick E. Whitten to Ewing Young Mitchell, Jr. on March 19, 1940. Whitten responds to William Hirth's suggestion that he run for office in the 1940 election.

Date: 
March 19th 1940

Pages

KANSAS CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY | DIGITAL HISTORY
Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict,1855-1865.
The Pendergast Years, Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression.
KC History, Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library.